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I love the fancy Jaegerpistole. Any background info on the engraving? Can’t discern the finish... nickle?
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I love the fancy Jaegerpistole. Any background info on the engraving? Can’t discern the finish... nickle?
I can only assume it's Nickel, as for who did it? maybe factory engraved? I'm looking into that now. It came from an acquaintance who passed and with him went all the info on what he had (which was more than even his wife knew)
 

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who did it? maybe factory engraved?
Welcome to the forum.

I don't think that a factory engraver would cover up the Walther logo and other text on the slide. Otherwise you have a beautiful pistol. I'm not normally interested in engraved guns but yours looks stunning.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Welcome to the forum.

I don't think that a factory engraver would cover up the Walther logo and other text on the slide. Otherwise you have a beautiful pistol. I'm not normally interested in engraved guns but yours looks stunning.


Very true...duh, shoulda thought of that. It's pretty nice work though.
 

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Very true...duh, shoulda thought of that. It's pretty nice work though.
Would you show us images of the gun with grips removed? I would like to see the internal finish. And the magazine too. Thank you.
 

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my thoughts on the engraving based on pics the poster sent me directly

I think the pattern certainly looks like a pattern of that time period as I have seen on Walther PP and PPKs. I can’t say I have seen any Olympias engraved that I knew to be authentic so this statement is purely based on pattern similarities to other guns.

On the other hand there are several details about the oak leaves shape and style that make me think the pattern was not cut by a Suhl trained engraver where oak leaves are his bread and butter.

Also there is only the one closeup pf the engraving at the rear sight area, but in that I do not see the characteristic burring associated with the Suhl offset vise technique that is unique to that region even today.

Other concerning areas to me beyond the engraving is the fact that several of the screws are burred up, and apparently blued or plated over. An engraved piece is typically shot very little and its unusual to see deformed screw heads. The fact they have finish over the deformity is indicative a refinish at best. Lastly, the plating is in much better shape than is typically seen on guns of this period. That is not an absolutely positive negative, but it certainly make you look harder at the whole presentation.
 

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my thoughts on the engraving based on pics the poster sent me directly

I think the pattern certainly looks like a pattern of that time period as I have seen on Walther PP and PPKs. I can’t say I have seen any Olympias engraved that I knew to be authentic so this statement is purely based on pattern similarities to other guns.

On the other hand there are several details about the oak leaves shape and style that make me think the pattern was not cut by a Suhl trained engraver where oak leaves are his bread and butter.

Also there is only the one closeup pf the engraving at the rear sight area, but in that I do not see the characteristic burring associated with the Suhl offset vise technique that is unique to that region even today.

Other concerning areas to me beyond the engraving is the fact that several of the screws are burred up, and apparently blued or plated over. An engraved piece is typically shot very little and its unusual to see deformed screw heads. The fact they have finish over the deformity is indicative a refinish at best. Lastly, the plating is in much better shape than is typically seen on guns of this period. That is not an absolutely positive negative, but it certainly make you look harder at the whole presentation.

Giving some visual support to these comments, in these three images you can see differences in the oak-leaf treatment by the engraver as well as the use of acorns.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)

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First, Really cool stuff! Thanks for posting.
The target pistol is a real beauty.

Second, That engraving is reminiscent of the stuff that was done in Mexico back in the 50's, 60's an very early 70's.
A lot of really nice collectible stuff went through that mill.

That having been said, what's done is done. I can appreciate the time and work that went into it. Probably cost someone a lot of money to have it done.

Lastly, of the 3 you posted, I'd pick that engraved pistol over the rifle. Maybe it's just me....
 
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