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I decided to whittle down the tang on my Fort Smith stainless PPK to make it easier to carry IWB. All I used were hand tools; a mill file to cut it to the basic dimensions/contour that I wanted, then sanding strips and emery boards to get the shape. I used 600 grit wet/dry sandpaper to blend the finish together. It took three project days, which is not the same as three days, as I took numerous breaks to mow the grass, etc.

Overall the feel is much smoother, no sharp edges anywhere the frame contacts my hand. The tang is the same length, which does (for me) eliminate slide bite.

Picture 1 and 2 are of the modified tang. Picture 3 is my Interarms PPK; you can see that the tang is nowhere near as long, but I frequently get slide bite if I don't take time to adjust hand. However, it wears really well in an IWB holster.
Picture 4 is a PPK/S with an unmodified tang to compare against Picture 1.
 

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Great job! And I'm very pleased how they fixed the spacing of the lettering, compared to the first pics of the Arkansas PPK.
 

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The designer in me still wants to round the top portion to get rid of the hanging down look of the stock tang. The photoshop of the one above has only had a bit of the top of the tang removed to create a reverse of the curve the rear of the slide has. The bottom was left stock. At least the stainless model allows re-profiling without getting into refinishing. 1917
 

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The designer in me still wants to round the top portion to get rid of the hanging down look of the stock tang. The photoshop of the one above has only had a bit of the top of the tang removed to create a reverse of the curve the rear of the slide has. The bottom was left stock. At least the stainless model allows re-profiling without getting into refinishing. 1917
The image you attached just looks "right". Form and function.

It certainly looks the goods.
 

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Nice work! Walther Arms in Fort Smith should have designed their variant of the PPK and PPK/S like what you did to your example.
Or perhaps, better yet, not adopted the S&W extended tang at all. :p
 

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Or perhaps, better yet, not adopted the S&W extended tang at all. :p

Besides the much moaned about looks, it also makes it a bit unwieldy for pocket carry, taking more space and making snags more likely.


Somehow the Kimber Micro 9 doesn't seem to need such a huge tail.
 

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The original redesign of the tang was for a couple of purposes. To better protect some hand shapes from the slide and the fast moving hammer. They also can help with a quick and precise grip of a firearm. So the form of the part does follow a specific function but that usually never dictates one solution much less a reason for ignoring aesthetics. On the other hand some people might love the look of the stock nose. I think they could have done better. 1917



And on this one I kept the top curve while removing just a small amt of material from the rear of the bottom. Hand still protected from slide and hammer. The top cutout for the hammer is retained.
 

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Not hard to figure out why Smith did what they did, and it serves a purpose. But no small part of the PPK's charm are its looks and feel.
The bad news is it falls short on the looks thing. The good news is, many of us are simply getting used to it, like we all did with the PPK/s.
But 1917's design is far better.
Moon
 

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We are luddites only if we object to new ways that are actually useful. :)
 

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Another design maxim is that repetition creates unity. There are a lot of smooth portions of circles in the design of the pistol. I simply followed the theme already present in the original design. 1917
 

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Not hard to figure out why Smith did what they did, and it serves a purpose. But no small part of the PPK's charm are its looks and feel.
The bad news is it falls short on the looks thing. The good news is, many of us are simply getting used to it, like we all did with the PPK/s.
But 1917's design is far better.
Moon
The Smith beavertail just looks --- crude. Seemingly driven by ease of machining more than optimal form and function.

A classic gun like the PPK deserves better.

Certainly there is precedent here. The 1911 especially and to a lesser extent the Hi-Power benefited from the development of more ergonomic and functional beavertails and other parts over the years.
 

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I've a Colt Officers with an odd beavertail, but most of them are curvy and ergonomic. Even the little Colt fits my hand well.

1917's circles make graceful sense. Since the onset of the Glock, fugly guns have become the norm, the squared off triggerguard in particular.
Modern, poly pistols are kinda like Insul-brick shingles on the sides of a house; brand new, it's as ugly as they are going to get.
Make no mistake, I like poly guns for their utility; not so much for their appearance.
Moon
 
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