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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A question popped into my head as I was doing some research and looking at the new PPK models. Do the latest two generations (this comming release as well as the S&W generation) have any proof marks or official marks to indicate that they were tested?

I remember the S&W model coming with a test casing envelope but nowhere on the gun do I remember seeing a proof mark or stamp, only .380 ACP stamped on the barrel hood. Interarms models were US made and they had a proof mark on the barrel hood. On Walther's website the pictures of the PPQ for example, clearly show the Ulm proof mark. Pictures of the new PPK appear to show duplicate markings of the S&W version.

Is there an official proof mark on the latest generations of the PPK or was the Ulm proof mark replaced with something else in that particular model? If not, then what does that mean in terms of durability? The original test targets of Ulm and Interarms contained a full mags worth of test firing, but I only remember the S&W test envelope containing 1 or 2 casings.
 

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I doubt the new PPK with have proof marks as that's not a requirement in the US. It probably won't come with any spent cartridge cases either.
 

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The cartridge casing, included for many years with US manufactured (and imports as well) handguns was part of a bright idea on the part of the State of Maryland.
They collected and maintained a database of a casing from every new pistol, with the plan of catching criminals by matching crime-scene casings. It cost a metric chit-ton of money, and caught exactly no one. It was finally abandoned.
Manufacturers included the casing with the gun to prove they had complied with Maryland law.
Further proof that, if criminals were bureaucrats, we could paper whip them to death.
Moon
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I doubt the new PPK with have proof marks as that's not a requirement in the US. It probably won't come with any spent cartridge cases either.
Why did US made Interarms do proofing back then? Did the law change since their production run? And the purpose of the proofing was to demonstrate that the weapon wouldn't blow up at certain tested pressures.
 

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Guns made in Europe but imported by Interarms will carry a proof.
Domestic makers do their own in-house proofing; it's not clear if all guns are proofed, or just randomn examples.
Moon
 

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The "VA" mark over the chamber of Interarms' U.S.-made PPK/s and PPK pistols was a nod to European tradition, probably insisted upon by Sam Cummings for symbolic reasons. Its significance (and the stage of production at which it was applied) is uncertain. Ranger supposedly test-fired all guns (or imaginatively produced factory targets), but it's unclear whether any were proof-tested, i.e, fired at some pressure significantly higher than normal.

There was not --and never has been--any legal requirement in the USA that commercial firearms be proved. It might be noted that Ranger-made TPH pistols do not bear that "proof" stamp.

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I do t see any marks on mine other than the one used to indicate the recall was performed. It did come with the casing in an envelope.
 

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I'd noticed the 'VA' and assumed it merely reflected Interarms place of business. Did it indicate that a proof load had actually been fired?

Concur that test-targets have been part of the Walther tradition, but always presumed they were with standard loads.
Some US guns will carry extra proof information; I've a Smith .38 Centennial marked 'tested for +p+' in the cylinder window.
Moon
 
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