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Discussion Starter #1
I think I posted something about this a year or so ago, but I had no way to post pics then and I don't think I ever got much response. I have a pretty nice PP that I figure to be from 1942 or 43, but I see no evidence of any sort of proof marks on it. From what I read if it was a military or police issue firearm it would have certain marks on the barrel or receiver, but I see no marks of any kind besides the serials and makers logos, etc. Would they be selling civilian guns in the middle of the war? Would those have no markings?










I tried to resize the images in imgur, but I'm not very good at this. If those are as enormous as they look, here are the direct links to the photos.
And I give up; the images show up in the preview text box, but not in the post. I have no idea why.









IIRC from what I read, I was under the impression that ALL Walthers ought to have some sort of proof marks. Any suggestions?
And yes, I know, don't post serials numbers. But from what I've read it's really not worth the effort to go back and blur them out. Took me a while just to upload those to start with. I guess I'll take my chances.
 

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I can't be sure but it looks like file marks where WaA stamps typically are on slide and frame. As far as E/N marks, I can't see the metal well enough to see what is going on.

If I had to wager a guess and it is only a guess, the Nazi marks have been scrubbed and the gun reblued. There are locations especially the barrel housing that is heavily pitted with blue inside the pitting. The proof on the end of the barrel is almost there as I can see parts of the eagle wings. It looks scrubbed. The far right side of the banner on left of slide took a hit from the file and some of the letters are almost gone.

Let me know if you see these things I pointed out, in person. It is too difficult to tell for certain with pictures and less than optimal lighting.
 

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I believe that I can at least recognize a very badly stamped nitro proof mark (eagle/N) on the barrel.

Good eye. I agree. There is also something dead center on the frame boss at the ejection port area, looks sort of like an 8 but I can't make it out. The lighting isn't too good but that blow up feature sure does show stuff up close.

Your photos are showing up fine Johnny45. Next time work on your light a bit.
Lighting is almost everything in photography. The goal is to make your photos clearly illustrate what you are trying to show. 1917



Much later proof mark, '69 and it hasn't been worn away, yet even here you can see that one wing wasn't as deeply indented as the other on the round surface.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Good eye. I agree. There is also something dead center on the frame boss at the ejection port area, looks sort of like an 8 but I can't make it out. The lighting isn't too good but that blow up feature sure does show stuff up close.

Your photos are showing up fine Johnny45. Next time work on your light a bit.
Lighting is almost everything in photography. The goal is to make your photos clearly illustrate what you are trying to show. 1917



Much later proof mark, '69 and it hasn't been worn away, yet even here you can see that one wing wasn't as deeply indented as the other on the round surface.

Man, not an ultra rare collectors item then? Darn. :rolleyes:

Okay, thanks. I'm usually only up at night, and there isn't very good lighting in this place. I took them right under my reading light, but even so it could be a lot better. I'll take it outside and take some photos under the sunlight next time I get a chance. Some good suggestions anyway. I hadn't considered the bluing in the pitting; I guess I thought that was something to do with the rough wartime quality control, but it makes sense. It was found in my grandfather's house after he died, and I don't believe any of my family served in WWII (he was an electrical engineer for GE, so I think they needed him at home more), and I can only see him buying a pistol if he got a really good deal on it somewhere. He would have bought it just to use, not because of collector's value. It was with a stock of ammo that I'd guess to be from the 1960s or maybe 70s, in several calibers, all the same brand, Winchester Super Speed in yellow boxes.
 

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Having a proof stamped on the barrel is good thing. I'd be a bit dubious about firing a pistol that had not had the barrel proofed. It might blow up. You have an old pistol from a historic time. It is what it is, keep it clean and oiled...plenty of people would like to own it. 1917
 
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