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There is a Thefirearmblog article about the Walther Meister Manufaktur guns Walther will be importing.

The ones shown are gussied up versions of the PPQ SF.

Some are gaudy to my taste and some are beautiful. Either way, it's great to see Walther doing something different.

Hopefully, a catalog or web page will be available showing what's available and pricing.
 

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It’s a disappointing trend from many manufacturers. No real innovation is forthcoming from the majors, so they play with colors and accessories, what we call in the motorcycle hobby, ‘farkle’: baubles and bolt-ons that make things look different but don’t improve the underlying design or function. When a company like Hudson comes along with a genuine departure from all the Chevy-designs, they can’t make it. The only exception has been Kel-Tec, who continues to innovate.
 

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It’s a disappointing trend from many manufacturers. No real innovation is forthcoming from the majors, so they play with colors and accessories, what we call in the motorcycle hobby, ‘farkle’: baubles and bolt-ons that make things look different but don’t improve the underlying design or function. When a company like Hudson comes along with a genuine departure from all the Chevy-designs, they can’t make it. The only exception has been Kel-Tec, who continues to innovate.
The innovative gun this year is the Laugo Alien. Hopefully they make it. It seems IMHO a real step forward in several respects.
 

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I like the utilitarian nature of poly pistols; no guilt in using/abusing them.
But no sense in tarting them up, either...changing color is about as far as I'd go.
Happily, there are some mechanically beautiful guns, whether nicely finished 1911s or the new-to-here SIG P210.
But new-under-the-sun isn't common in the gun bidness.
Moon
 

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I think Sig has got to be the most innovative company around that actually sells guns to the masses.
 

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Would be nice to get a solid slide for my Q5 SF, no lightening cuts or crazy serrations, just simple. Hell, I wouldn’t mind a Q5 SF without a rail or elongated beaver tail either.
 

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I think Sig has got to be the most innovative company around that actually sells guns to the masses.
I expect Sig and Ruger are trying to get their hands on a Luago Alien as we speak. To you know...get inspired.
 

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Doubt either one of them is too interested in capturing a piece of the $3000 9mm market.
It's $3000 because they are essential custom built competition guns.

The ideas though, are transferable.
 

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It's $3000 because they are essential custom built competition guns.

The ideas though, are transferable.
Point is, nobody will likely try. The engineering is interesting but so far, I haven't seen any performance capability to offset the added complexity.
 

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Point is, nobody will likely try. The engineering is interesting but so far, I haven't seen any performance capability to offset the added complexity.
It's early HHPIN. It will take time.

If the ideas bare fruit in competition and I think they will, they might catch on in more general usage.

I was an early adopter of the Glock. I thought they were on to something. It took years for the plastic Glock to be fully accepted. Today, the Glock's influence on other manufacturers designs is obvious. But it took time.
 

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I find that I don't get too excited by all the hoopla over "new" releases anymore. I imagine its the perspective you get with time.

When I really started shooting, semi-auto were pretty much a non-issue with the exception of 1911's. Even so, everyone understood that if you wanted a useable 1911 you would have to re-invest at least the price of the the gun again in getting it to shoot accurately and reliably.

Back then, adding a custom barrel/bushing could get you on the order of a 100% improvement. With today's guns, same modifications might get you a 5-10% improvement.

The big leap in all manufacturing has been the vast improvement is electronic and CNC controls and the ability to build in large quantity with very small tolerance in variations.

Most of the real advances have come in the realm of products that make the guns easier to shoot well. Electronic sights and lasers in particular have make the act of shooting much more precise with much less effort than ever before.

My primary carry gun these days is a revolver whose design dates back 40 years and is virtually unchanged. It does carry a set of laser grips of very recent design that allows me to shoot this as well or better as some much higher end target revolvers I've owned in the past.

Red dots sights are much the same. Its stupid easy to stand there with a decent pistol equipped with a red dot and just punch the center out of the target all day long. Not for nothing are they generally banned from bullseye competitions.

Overall, I see more real benefits coming in the form of new shooting aids than breathless announcements of new guns with frames and barrels forged from rare, meteoric Unobtainium.

I also look forward to a day when new stuff can be released without using the word "tactical" even once. Heck, in 1873 a Colt single action was the height of "tactical".
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I find that I don't get too excited by all the hoopla over "new" releases anymore. I imagine its the perspective you get with time.

When I really started shooting, semi-auto were pretty much a non-issue with the exception of 1911's. Even so, everyone understood that if you wanted a useable 1911 you would have to re-invest at least the price of the the gun again in getting it to shoot accurately and reliably.

Back then, adding a custom barrel/bushing could get you on the order of a 100% improvement. With today's guns, same modifications might get you a 5-10% improvement.

The big leap in all manufacturing has been the vast improvement is electronic and CNC controls and the ability to build in large quantity with very small tolerance in variations.

Most of the real advances have come in the realm of products that make the guns easier to shoot well. Electronic sights and lasers in particular have make the act of shooting much more precise with much less effort than ever before.

My primary carry gun these days is a revolver whose design dates back 40 years and is virtually unchanged. It does carry a set of laser grips of very recent design that allows me to shoot this as well or better as some much higher end target revolvers I've owned in the past.

Red dots sights are much the same. Its stupid easy to stand there with a decent pistol equipped with a red dot and just punch the center out of the target all day long. Not for nothing are they generally banned from bullseye competitions.

Overall, I see more real benefits coming in the form of new shooting aids than breathless announcements of new guns with frames and barrels forged from rare, meteoric Unobtainium.

I also look forward to a day when new stuff can be released without using the word "tactical" even once. Heck, in 1873 a Colt single action was the height of "tactical".
I agree with your points. The basic problem of launching a lethal projectile from a handheld firearm was solved some time ago. I too still often carry a small revolver.

My thought on the Alien pistol though is they've come up with a way to make controlling muzzle flip easier. It also makes it possible to mount a small RDS on a stable, non-moving surface, which should mean less wear and tear on the sight and easier for the shooters eye to track.

No, it's not like going from black powder to metallic cartridges with smokeless powder but I think it is a step forward.
 

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I agree with your points. The basic problem of launching a lethal projectile from a handheld firearm was solved some time ago. I too still often carry a small revolver.

My thought on the Alien pistol though is they've come up with a way to make controlling muzzle flip easier. It also makes it possible to mount a small RDS on a stable, non-moving surface, which should mean less wear and tear on the sight and easier for the shooters eye to track.

No, it's not like going from black powder to metallic cartridges with smokeless powder but I think it is a step forward.
To some degree, I did the same on my 5" PPQ by adding red dot with a UM Tactical rail mount. Adds some weight to offset recoil (which I don't care much about) and sight doesn't ride the slide. Problem solved for $80 versus $3000 and the benefit is transferrable to any gun with a 1913 rail.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
To some degree, I did the same on my 5" PPQ by adding red dot with a UM Tactical rail mount. Adds some weight to offset recoil (which I don't care much about) and sight doesn't ride the slide. Problem solved for $80 versus $3000 and the benefit is transferrable to any gun with a 1913 rail.
Yep. Walther with their SF are attempting to mitigate muzzle flip and recoil by adding weight.

Luago, in my opinion, took a more innovative approach.

Someone earlier in the thread bemoaned the lack of innovation. My point is i think innovation is still occurring.

I'm not arguing if that is appropriate for you are not.
 

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Yep. Walther with their SF are attempting to mitigate muzzle flip and recoil by adding weight.

Luago, in my opinion, took a more innovative approach.

Someone earlier in the thread bemoaned the lack of innovation. My point is i think innovation is still occurring.

I'm not arguing if that is appropriate for you are not.
All for innovation predicated on the premise that it provides benefits that can't be easily achieved any other way. Red dots and lasers certainly fit that category and I am very enthusiastic about that technology.

Boutique pistols have been around for a while. First one I was aware of was the Korth. Korth are somewhat like the Luagos, BRNO's, Hudson's and others in that no doubt they are very finely designed and built but none have ever had much impact on the overall market. It sort of like wondering why Chevrolet doesn't take its cues from Veyron or Bugatti.

I'm glad there are people out there trying to innovate, I just can't see where it will ever be able to get out of connoisseur market.
 
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