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Hello:
Any chance someone could provide me some information on a handgun I obtained. I am confused by some markings and cannot find appropriate info on the gun. It is a Manurhin PPK/S, serial # 329534s. On the left side of the slide it states "Manurhin, Made in France".But on the right side it states "Manurhin International" "Alexandria, Virginia". The gun has Manurhin grips, and the barrel is stamped St Etienne. Would you have any info regarding history, production date, location, etc... I would greatly appreciate any info someone at Walther may be able to provide about this gun.
Thank you very much.
 

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Yours is a Manurhin PPK/S which was indeed made in France. It was imported into the USA by Manurhin International of Alexandria, Virginia.

I'll need to check my books to give you a range on the dates they were imported. My Manurhin 9mmk has serial number 264743S and was made close to the end of production in 1985.
92399


I'm not sure about 32 serial number date ranges and I'll see if any of my books can help out.
 

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Yours is a Manurhin PPK/S which was indeed made in France. It was imported into the USA by Manurhin International of Alexandria, Virginia.

I'll need to check my books to give you a range on the dates they were imported. My Manurhin 9mmk has serial number 264743S and was made close to the end of production in 1985.
View attachment 92399

I'm not sure about 32 serial number date ranges and I'll see if any of my books can help out.
I sure appreciate the quick feedback. I have seen a few pictures of other guns similar with later serial numbers that had dates in the 70's, but none near mine. Any additional info you have would be greatly appreciated. Thank you again.
 

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The S/N 329534 seems to belong to one of the latest PPK/S guns in .32 ever made by Manurhin thus 1984 is probably the year of manufacture.
 

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I sure appreciate the quick feedback. I have seen a few pictures of other guns similar with later serial numbers that had dates in the 70's, but none near mine. Any additional info you have would be greatly appreciated. Thank you again.
Dieter Marschall's book actually shows the serial number range for Manurhin stamped .32 PPK/S ending a few below yours at 329527S in 1984
 

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Dieter Marschall's book actually shows the serial number range for Manurhin stamped .32 PPK/S ending a few below yours at 329527S in 1984
OK great! I sure appreciate your time and feedback. I guess that explains the import to Virginia. That what stumped me as I thought the gun was a earlier production. Thanks again!
 

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Thanks Vandal. If you want to French kiss someone this is how you do it.

I carried this for a number of years.
It has always been 100% reliable, easy to care for and still comes along for the ride every so often.
Here is a slightly better image :

92408
 

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I sure appreciate the quick feedback. I have seen a few pictures of other guns similar with later serial numbers that had dates in the 70's, but none near mine. Any additional info you have would be greatly appreciated. Thank you again.
So when are you going to post a few images of your new acquisition? We are looking forward to it.
 
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The 32 is the platform the PPs were designed to shoot and it is a delight.
Keep a good grip on the weapon and be aware that the web of your strong hand is resting just under the tang. Some folks have been bitten by the slide when it cycles.
Proper firm grip will prevent this. It will also make sure the weapon cycles properly.

A hint would be to but a couple of drops of Ballistol on the rails before your range trip and on the recoil spring too. Not too much, just a couple of drops. It helps that slide run smoothly. Good ball ammo will help too.
 

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Scott, it's a very nice gun that you have. The late Manurhins are probably the only PP series guns whose slides are marked in strict English language. All other versions I know of show either "Modell" in German spelling or the clever language-neutral compromise "Mod.". I believe that the elegant latter solution was already introduced at the times of the Walther Mark II models.
 

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The 32 is the platform the PPs were designed to shoot and it is a delight.
Keep a good grip on the weapon and be aware that the web of your strong hand is resting just under the tang. Some folks have been bitten by the slide when it cycles.
Proper firm grip will prevent this. It will also make sure the weapon cycles properly.

A hint would be to but a couple of drops of Ballistol on the rails before your range trip and on the recoil spring too. Not too much, just a couple of drops. It helps that slide run smoothly. Good ball ammo will help too.
I've been bitten before - no fun. I'll certainly take your advice on the grip. I'm also headed to the bench now to add a couple of well placed drops Ballistol as you indicated. I spent 24 years in the military and learned early on the best source of advice is experience. So, I appreciate your expertise once again and will put it to good use sir!
 

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Scott, it's a very nice gun that you have. The late Manurhins are probably the only PP series guns whose slides are marked in strict English language. All other versions I know of show either "Modell" in German spelling or the clever language-neutral compromise "Mod.". I believe that the elegant latter solution was already introduced at the times of the Walther Mark II models.
Thanks Balough, I appreciate the feedback. I am trying to read a lot and learn what I can about the history of not only this gun, but of Walther in general. Very interesting story post WWII and on. The little did bits you mentioned are invaluable. Thanks for taking time to pass them on!
 

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Scott, it's a very nice gun that you have. The late Manurhins are probably the only PP series guns whose slides are marked in strict English language. All other versions I know of show either "Modell" in German spelling or the clever language-neutral compromise "Mod.". I believe that the elegant latter solution was already introduced at the times of the Walther Mark II models.
I agree it is a sweet looking weapon. I hope we get a range report soon.

As to language that might make sense as the PPK/S is a unique solution to a problem caused by the Gun Control Act of 1968 and aimed largely at importing to the "American" market. I wouldn't wonder if they had that in mind when they marked the slides.
 

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As to language that might make sense as the PPK/S is a unique solution to a problem caused by the Gun Control Act of 1968 and aimed largely at importing to the "American" market. I wouldn't wonder if they had that in mind when they marked the slides.
Seen from that point of view it's even a little bit surprising that both Interarms and Smith & Wesson preferred the German spelling "Modell" on their guns. Especially in the case of the Interarms models it's remarkable because they show "License" in American English to meet the US taste while Smith & Wesson later switched back to the international English version "Licence".
 

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While I see your point however I'll posit this:
What about a case of Americans wanting to copy the "original" making a more "European" seeming weapon hence the Interarms' and S&W' spelling decisions . While we have the French deciding to produce something aimed directly at the "American" market and the decision to use American spelling.

I doubt we'll ever know the thinking behind these markings but these suppositions are interesting. Heck it could be a simple as they handed the information to someone to proofread before it was finalized for inclusion on the slide markings and it was a reflection of the proof reader's language...(doubtful but possible).
 
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What about a case of Americans wanting to copy the "original" making a more "European" seeming weapon hence the Interarms' and S&W' spelling decisions.
It's possible. It's also possible that Sam Cummings simply didn't know how his parents would have spelt "Licence".
 

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I am trying to read a lot and learn what I can about the history of not only this gun, but of Walther in general.
@RafMan already told it: your PPK/S is out of today's commonly known range of serial numbers. This cirumstance makes your gun quite interesting and desirable. But just pay attention.The Walther Bug is an almost incurable disease. The treatment of symptoms usually is limited to the purchase of more beautiful Walthers. Enjoy your very special PPK/S!
 

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While we have the French deciding to produce something aimed directly at the "American" market and the decision to use American spelling.
That's probably true and I suppose your PPK/S shows for this reason the calibre designation "9mm Kurz" as used by many Americans instead of the idiomatic German designation "9mm kurz".
 
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