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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
well bought my first manurhin PP.22lr
it was very interesting digging into the history, but now i've found about all i can on my own.

SER #. 137XXLP based upon what i've read here it was made around 1957-58

@95 bluing - (some holster scratches and wear)
mechanically fine
original box, manual, 2 mags

STAMPED :TG IMP WPB FL
which i think is for : Tennessee Guns imported west palm beach florida

the extractor is copper plated, which i have not seen on any other PP photo, is this possibly a repair?

right below the ejector port in VERY small letters is
'symbols tF TIENN symbols". (photo)

any comments / corrections / from PP the experts?
 

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That "copper plating" that you see is actually a plum color from the hardening process. Very common on makarov small parts. I think it had to do with the nickle content of the part. I'm not a metalugist though...

And, quite a find! I might add!
 

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Manufacture d'armes de Saint-…tienne as wolf said...

Here is my 55 vintage 7.65 Manurhin PP with similar markings:



BTW my extractor claw is plum colored too....
 

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FWIIW, I have noticed the plum colored extractor on almost all of the .22 versions that I have seen. Why, I haven't a clue...I would think that the metal used would be the same, regardless of caliber.
 

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Different salts, bath temperatures and metal alloys Geo???
 

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Quite common and I've seen many, but only on rim fires. Those extractors still always had the Rockwell hardness dimple present near the tip.
I was always wondering if there was a slight temper difference on rim fire extractors than center fires because the forward curve of the extractor strikes and pivots when contacting the angled solid extractor groove on the barrel chamber. Maybe has to be a bit softer than the barrel. Rim fire barrels fully enclose the base of the round because the brass doesn't have a solid support at the base like center fires do. Center fire barrels have a notch and the extractor never touches the barrel.
I've been asked on occasion to polish the exposed purple color off and apply some cold blue to match the rest of the pistols blue. Turns out good if you do a final buffing to match the rest of the pistols shine.
Maybe Mike or anyone else can correct me or have any other thoughts.
Go ahead, I can take it. It's just all thoughts on my part.
 

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The extractor on my '71 was plum colored. You also see this on various P.38, Lugers, and others.
 

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FWIIW, I have noticed the plum colored extractor on almost all of the .22 versions that I have seen. Why, I haven't a clue...I would think that the metal used would be the same, regardless of caliber.
It is, but the reason for the color is the particular alloy from which the extractor is made. It's a chrome moly steel used only for the extractor, the trigger bar, and a few other parts. Probably the bluing salts used at that time did not work well on that alloy.

M
 
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