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Under what circumstances should we disassemble/clean the firing pin spring assembly? I watched a youtube video recently out of curiosity and I can't believe what a hassle...particularly when you consider the simplicity of field stripping. I know some of y'all strip and clean your mags after every shooting session too...must be some good reason. Thanks!
 

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Depends on how much you shoot. I might remove the firing pin once per year. Same with magazine if I take a class where I'm dropping mags in the dirt they might get cleaned when I get home.



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Depends on the make and model. Some Walthers were designed for close quarters self defense, whereas others were/are designed for more of a combat role. Take the PPK for instance. It wasn't designed for long sustained shooting. After 50 rounds it gets plenty of dirt and carbon build up. Some get finicky when this occurs. I have seen others run fine with hundreds of rounds and no cleaning. Compare that with the P99 that was designed for the opposite and more than twice the magazine capacity.
 

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Depends upon usage...
Is this your EDC?
If so. it comes down to where you draw the line on dependability and how much you value your life and that of your family and comrades over time and hassle of cleaning various parts of your weapons.

If your weapon is part of your "life support system" well...how much time is your life worth?
 

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Too many variables. What I can tell you is that I check the firing pin opening after every range session for buildup. It's part of my field-strip cleaning. As for disassembling to the point of pulling the actual firing pin out of the weapon - almost never unless I am getting weak strikes (I do check the primers on spent rounds for the dimples).
 

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Also it depends on which gun it is. The P99 and PPQ is super easy to take the back plate off and pull out the striker assembly, the PPK is more involved so I would take that into consideration.

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The firing pin assembly of different guns is quite different. On the SIG Sauer P220 series it is a pin that has to be removed to take the fp out and many police departments do not let officers do that themselves and the guns go through thousands of rounds without issues. Same with my Glocks, after over 10,000 rounds of reloads with Alliant Bullseye mid-level loads, that have more gas blow back than high pressure loads, I had a pretty clean striker/firing pin. Adding oil to the striker/fp will make residue stick and catch lint, though. Most firing pin problems I have experienced were from hardenend grease or oil, rarely a broken fp.
 

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...On the SIG Sauer P220 series it is a pin that has to be removed to take the fp out and many police departments do not let officers do that themselves ...
With good reason. The firing pin (and extractor) of SIG/Sauer 220 series pistols should not be removed unless absolutely necessary. The rolls pins (nested, one inside the other) are special HD pins that are single-use only and must be replaced with new ones if removed. It's also very difficult to accomplish without making a mess of the slide unless has the proper tools.

In most cases a perfectly adequate cleaning can be done with shooting a spray solvent like BrakeKleen or Gunscrubber into the firing pin hole and extractor cavity and blowing it out with 90 psi compressed air. Follow with some CLP and blow that out too.

M
 

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A resounding second for the notion of using compressed air to clean things you really shouldn't take apart frequently. I plumbed an air line into the shop, and often give a blast down the FP hole, or from the rear and then the front. It will dislodge dirt in all sorts of other places as well.

One of many great things with Glocks (and newer SIGs), the nylon firing pin liner that doesn't require lubrication.
Also handy is a needle oiler; it saves us from too exuberant oiling.
It's worth cleaning something you're apt to carry; range queens, not so much. Clean guns don't get shot.
Moon
 
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