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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just curious, I have less than 3K rounds through my P99. But for you guys with more, what spare parts or maintenance operations have you done or know of that needs to be done at various round counts?
Are there any parts that can suddenly break that one should have in their range bag, eg Guide rods?
Thanks. I'm enjoying the Walther experience, but just wondered.
 

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That's a good question farranger! I've been wondering the same thing. I too have around 3K through a couple of my P99's, so far, with out a single bobble I might add...
I was thinking of doing the same thing I did with my Sig 226 when I hit around 5K with it and that was to call Sig and ask them directly, what parts they would recommend I change out or carry for spares. They where very forthwith with the information and out side of some springs and a couple of pins, there was not much... I'll bet S&W would be happy to give us the same information on the P99... I might just have to do that before very long, and if nobody else answers your question, I'll post what they have to say...
Thanks for bringing it up!
 

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Well I'll take a stab at answering this question:

First, round count does not always tell the whole story as to how hard your weapon is being used. Those that shoot some competition or use their weapon to qualify ......... will probably add more wear and tear from "heat" build up than just your average plinker.

The Walther [ in all calibers ] is a very low maintenance firearm. With reasonable care you should be able to shoot well over 50 K through the pistol before worrying about barrel replacement or firing pin change outs. I have told this story many times here, but I saw a P-226 Sig fired over 100,000 times without cleaning & without a jam or malfunction. This was from an all steel framed gun -- important fact ? I don't know.

As a precaution [ only ] I replace the "recoil spring" at about every 5 to 7 K. It is at this point that I start to notice some compression in the spring length. This procedure also replaces the guide rod, that so many people are worried about because it is ploymer. Both units can probably last a great deal longer ....... this replacement "thing" is just a personal choice.

Other than that........use your cleaning procedure to catch any defects you might notice forming........... ie. any enlarging of the frame holes holding the trigger group. Excessive wear to the rail system -- not something a part replacement can fix ...... but you will notice a decrease in accuracy.

There is really only one weapon that I carry spare parts for in a SHTF situation........and that's my AR15. All my pistols and revolvers are reliable enough....I don't worry about them.

JF.
 

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I agree that recoil springs are the ones most often needing to be changed. I beleive that striker springs should be changed at the same time.
 

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I've had a slide lock spring break on me. So I keep an extra one around now. Plus a recoil and striker springs.
 

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20K through mine before I broke the ejector rod with a promag that sat a bit to high.  I have a spare recoil spring assembly, and I have heard that you can now get a hold of aftermarket guide rods made out of steel.

I have shot 3000k without cleaning it, competively shot it and heated it up to the point that most oils smoked off the rear of the slide.

Maybe you guys are thinking to 1911.
 

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[b said:
Quote[/b] (InfernoMDM @ May 07 2006,11:29)]...  I have a spare recoil spring assembly, and I have heard that you can now get a hold of aftermarket guide rods made out of steel.
...
Are you talking about the Sprinco, or have you heard of another?
 

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I read at some point that S&W is offering a metal one for people that are not comphy with the polymer one......
never called to find out if it's true though
 

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Uncut .... yes it was true, I got mine in mid-2002. It was black to start with, now it is half black half silver, functions reliably.
 

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I keep a small inventory of spare parts on-hand for my P99. I replace the recoil spring assembly after every 5k rounds. I also keep spare striker units readily availble. For preventive maintenance, I remove the striker assembly after 1k rounds for cleaning and a light coat of oil.
 

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I keep a small inventory of spare parts on-hand for my P99. I replace the recoil spring assembly after every 5k rounds. I also keep spare striker units readily availble. For preventive maintenance, I remove the striker assembly after 1k rounds for cleaning and a light coat of oil.
 

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It is quite easy to remove the striker assembly. Take a carefull look at the schematic 'blow-up' in your instruction manual. You will notice on the retaining plate that there is a small rectangular tab. That tab is the end portion of the striker unit. Once you have your pistol field stripped, you will need a very small screw driver to remove the striker unit. Push in the tab and at the same time slide the retaining plate out of the slide; take caution with the decock plate while doing the afore mentioned steps. Once you do the procedure a couple of times, it will become second nature. It is recommended that the striker unit should be cleaned after every 1k rounds. Clean it with a little solvent, wipe dry, then put a light coat of oil on the unit.
 

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I clean mine after every shoot. Not necessarily because I need to, but because I want to. The P99 is the most logically designed and the easiest to disassemble of any semi-automatic out there.
Of course that's IMO.
 
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