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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Please help. I have been reading about this somewhere on line but not able to confirm the source.
Does a modern pistol designed to disconnect a mag via releasing mag's lock due to excessive pressure and let it to be ejected away in the case of hard mechanical malfunction, squib or misfire which will be producing excessive force to prevent a firearm damage and minimizing potential shooter injures.
Does it really exist and serve as a safety feature?
Thx!
Gueorgui.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
eeeeeeeeeeeerrrrrrrrr nope.
Thank you for blowing my bubble. LOL.
Well, then I am going to ask something else...
If during IDPA/USPSA competition shooter is able to fire with presentation from the holster three shoots in three seconds and the first shot will be a squib! Something is telling me he will be squeezing the trigger at least one more time. I probably will do for sure. Everything is going super fast. What is exactly going to happen? Is that possible to clear the barrel with a second shot? I've heard that during shooting and selfdefense this is the only one feaseble option.
I am wondering if a good quality firearm like Walther/Sig/Glock will be able to sustain the damage. How?
But I hope they do!

Thx!
Gueorgui.
 

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No matter with which handgun, if you fire a shot and there is another bullet in the barrel, you will destroy the weapon irreparably. If you are unlucky, the weapon will even partially fly apart and fragments will injure you.
With a pistol, however, it is very unlikely if the powder charge does not ignite or only partially ignites and only the primer, that this has sufficient force to push the slide back completely to eject the empty case and load a new cartridge. That is why the risk of the situation you described is greater with a revolver.
If a cartridge does not ignite at all, you can only try to fire the cartridge by pulling the trigger a second time with a DA trigger. With striker-fired pistols with an SA trigger, you only have the option of ejecting the non-ignited cartridge by pulling back the slide and releasing the slide to load a new cartridge. Of course, you also have this option with a DA pistol. With a revolver, you automatically spin the drum by pulling the trigger (or by cocking the hammer of an old SA revolver) and have a new cartridge for firing it through the barrel.
 

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No such thing that I'm aware of. I doubt a squib that doesn't leave the barrel would cycle the slide.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
No matter with which handgun, if you fire a shot and there is another bullet in the barrel, you will destroy the weapon irreparably. If you are unlucky, the weapon will even partially fly apart and fragments will injure you.
With a pistol, however, it is very unlikely if the powder charge does not ignite or only partially ignites and only the primer, that this has sufficient force to push the slide back completely to eject the empty case and load a new cartridge. That is why the risk of the situation you described is greater with a revolver.
If a cartridge does not ignite at all, you can only try to fire the cartridge by pulling the trigger a second time with a DA trigger. With striker-fired pistols with an SA trigger, you only have the option of ejecting the non-ignited cartridge by pulling back the slide and releasing the slide to load a new cartridge. Of course, you also have this option with a DA pistol. With a revolver, you automatically spin the drum by pulling the trigger (or by cocking the hammer of an old SA revolver) and have a new cartridge for firing it through the barrel.
I thought you could find it quite interesting…
Regards.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
No such thing that I'm aware of. I doubt a squib that doesn't leave the barrel would cycle the slide.
FYI
 

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I have only experienced one squib (on a Beretta M9). It failed to cycle the slide and if it had gone unnoticed then I'm sure that it would have blown the gun and magazine apart on the next shot.

If you're shooting rapid fire in competition, training, or just for fun it's the risk you take. I don't let it worry me.
 

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I have only experienced one squib (on a Beretta M9). It failed to cycle the slide and if it had gone unnoticed then I'm sure that it would have blown the gun and magazine apart on the next shot.

If you're shooting rapid fire in competition, training, or just for fun it's the risk you take. I don't let it worry me.
I've encountered a few over the years. The last one was just a couple of weeks ago when shooting a PDP.

When it happens, you will feel it. Any gun has a certain feel when you shoot it. If something is off, like a greatly reduced powder charge to the point where there is a squib, the recoil sensation will be quite different.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I have only experienced one squib (on a Beretta M9). It failed to cycle the slide and if it had gone unnoticed then I'm sure that it would have blown the gun and magazine apart on the next shot.

If you're shooting rapid fire in competition, training, or just for fun it's the risk you take. I don't let it worry me.
Hello. Would you be able to clarify… “I'm sure that it would have blown the gun and magazine apart on the next shot”. Can I assume then that ejecting the mag is working as mitigation of the problem? For the same reason I have been also told that it’s not recommended to place support hand under the grip during a course of fire. Thank you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I've encountered a few over the years. The last one was just a couple of weeks ago when shooting a PDP.

When it happens, you will feel it. Any gun has a certain feel when you shoot it. If something is off, like a greatly reduced powder charge to the point where there is a squib, the recoil sensation will be quite different.
Did it cycle the slide on all occasions.
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Hello. Would you be able to clarify… “I'm sure that it would have blown the gun and magazine apart on the next shot”. Can I assume then that ejecting the mag is working as mitigation of the problem? For the same reason I have been also told that it’s not recommended to place support hand under the grip during a course of fire. Thank you.
The sole purpose of the magazine catch is to hold the magazine in place and it doesn't need to be very strong to do that. In many of the pictures that I've seen of blown up guns the magazine catch sheared and either ejected the magazine or blew it apart. Although in some cases this might absorb some of the blast I don't think that it is a design feature engineered into the gun.

I don't think that placing the support hand under the grip is inherently dangerous but it isn't a very practical shooting position.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
The sole purpose of the magazine catch is to hold the magazine in place and it doesn't need to be very strong to do that. In many of the pictures that I've seen of blown up guns the magazine catch sheared and either ejected the magazine or blew it apart. Although in some cases this might absorb some of the blast I don't think that it is a design feature engineered into the gun.

I don't think that placing the support hand under the grip is inherently dangerous but it isn't a very practical shooting position.
Clear enough. Regards.
 

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Did it cycle the slide on all occasions.
Thank you.
I don't remember definitely every time it happened. I do remember clearly it happening with a .41mag revolver.

When it happened a couple of weeks ago with my PDP the slide did cycle.

If I was lucky or good I can't say but I noticed something was not right and did not attempt to send another round down range.

If it happens you will feel and maybe hear it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I don't remember definitely every time it happened. I do remember clearly it happening with a .41mag revolver.

When it happened a couple of weeks ago with my PDP the slide did cycle.

If I was lucky or good I can't say but I noticed something was not right and did not attempt to send another round down range.

If it happens you will feel and maybe hear it.
Do you reload?
 

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Do you reload?
The .41mag was a friend's reload. If you shoot .41mag you almost have to reload.

The recent incident with the PDP was factory CCI ammo.

After the squib I examined the rest of the box and saw some rounds were shorter than others!

I should have noticed it while loading the gun.

So much for the quality of factory ammo loaded during the great ammo shortage.

I shoot a lot and have for many years. Put enough rounds down range and you will eventually run into some stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
The .41mag was a friend's reload. If you shoot .41mag you almost have to reload.

The recent incident with the PDP was factory CCI ammo.

After the squib I examined the rest of the box and saw some rounds were shorter than others!

I should have noticed it while loading the gun.

So much for the quality of factory ammo loaded during the great ammo shortage.

I shoot a lot and have for many years. Put enough rounds down range and you will eventually run into some stuff.
Thank you.
 
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