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Discussion Starter #1
I just had my Beretta worked on by a guy at the gun shop. He changed out some springs and did some polishing to help lighten the trigger action (still not as nice as my Walther!).

When I got it back, I was surprised to find that the gun was literally soaked in oil. It was oozing out of every crack between the slide and the frame, from ever lever and all over the inside.

Maybe I'm a minimalist, but I've always used a spare amount of oil after I clean. I use just a drop or two of Remoil or some 3/1 oil on the contact points: top of the barrel, slide rails, etc., along with an light (finger wipe) coat on the entire barrel exterior. Any excess I wipe off with a cloth before I put it away. With the 3/1, I find that it dries after a week or two, but the Remoil seems to maintain it's protection for quite a while. If it's been a while since I shot a particular gun, I'll give it a drop of two of oil before I take it out.

Am I missing something....should I be using significantly more lubrication? Or did this guy just go a little overboard?

Thanks,

Jim
 

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The guy may have gone a bit over-board for a gun that would be shot soon.........but gun makers ship their "new" guns that way for possible long term storage. So to error on the side of caution ( not knowing when you might use the weapon ) the reapir guy coated the gun well.

Be extremely careful using any kind of "penetrating" oil around your hand guns. It has been know to happen that small amounts will seep onto shell casings........then work their way into the primers and cause a FTF. Shell casings with "sealed" primers are less likely to be affected.

Your rails system is the most imortant part of the automatic that has to stay lubricated. How you achieve that is up to you. I use "Gun Slick" a graphite grease type of lubricant that will remain "wet" for months........and lubricate even longer than that with the dried graphite.

Using your finger is an excellent way of coating parts and the barrel..........it seems to deposit just the right amount of oil on the metal surface.

JF
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I need to get some graphite grease...I've heard good things about it for use on the rails.

The 3/1 I mentioned is the Formula 3 Gun Conditioner that comes with the KleenBore cleaning kits. It goes on the rail, barrel and that's about it. More and more, I've been using the Remoil instead. Although I find that it's tougher to control...one little drop of that Remoil will go a long way!
 

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Idunno, I've always heard that for long term storage, *grease* is more desirable than oil.

I'm with Jim though, I've always been taught that less is more when it comes to oil. I lubricate with Outer's and then wipe down, leaving only an ultra-thin film of oil. Graphite for the railings is excellent. Squeeze it on the inside of the slide where it makes contact with the polymer, and on the polymer. Assemble the gun, rack the slide a few times, then wipe off the excess that seeps out.

IIRC, too much oil will attract dust and grit.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
[b said:
Quote[/b] (BlakeTyner @ Aug. 07 2005,15:27)]IIRC, too much oil will attract dust and grit.
That's exactly what surprised me...because the oil did exactly what I expected it to. It caught all kinds of "gunk" that I don't normally have after a range session.

I understand long-term storage prep -- and to me grease is a better answer. But he knew I was going to shoot it right away (it's my gun for USPSA)...so I tend to think this is just "his way" of oiling a gun after a cleaning/repairs.

No harm...I just wondered what other people were used to.

Jim
 

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Jim,

I think he overdid it, from your description, regardless of when you were going to shoot!

I too use REMOIL almost exclusively.  I use the little straw that comes with the squeeze bottle, and the little drop that comes out of there will almost do the entire barell of my P99 with my finger!  I will spread a thin layer of remoil, so thin that it will begin almost evaporate.  I've been told to shake REMOIL before using it so the teflon suspended in it will mix well with the oil.  Even after the oil dries, the teflon coating remains.  It leaves a "cloudy" look over the coated parts after the oil dries, and I especially notice it on the black of the slide.

Bottom line, at least for me, is minimal lube.  There's so little metal to metal contact that it is really the barrel, chamber "hood", locking lugs, slide rails on frame, slide grooves in slide, and locking block that get lubricated.  Wipe on, wipe off, leave thin film, and good to go!

-stunks
 
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