Walther Forums banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,557 Posts
I generally wipe down my entire weapon with a soft, lightly oiled rag...hit the metal parts for sure and usually every other cleaning I will grease the rails...about every thousand rounds I will take my mags apart and clean them...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,914 Posts
When a gun is new, fire it about 50 rounds with no lube. Then tear it down and look carefully for all the bright spots. The gun will tell you where you need to lube it. The other places don't really matter except for anti-rust protection. Too much lube simply attracts and holds dirt.

If you use a degreasing agent for periodic thorough tear-down cleanings, replace the protective lubricant film by spraying the interior and exterior with whatever favorite product you use, then blast it repeatedly with 90 psi compressed air until you can't see any more lubricant on the surface. Learned that trick 40 years ago from a very astute man who rebuilt Underwood typewriters, and it works.

The importance of scrubbing the chamber simply cannot be overemphasized. And many magazine malfunctions are misdiagnosed as a weak spring when in fact the mag is just dirty and the follower is dragging. In my view, a 1000-rd. cleaning interval is nowhere near enough.

M
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
333 Posts
When a gun is new, fire it about 50 rounds with no lube. Then tear it down and look carefully for all the bright spots. The gun will tell you where you need to lube it.
Hmmmmm........ don't know about this one ?? Would you run your car without oil to learn what parts get hot and need lubrication ? I know a pistol is NOT a car , but they ARE both machines that have moving integrated parts.

Causing unnecessary wear or [even gouging of contact surfaces ] just to learn proper care of your firearm seems pretty "extreme".

IMHO ........ always clean and relubricate your NEW pistol before firing. The owners manual is a good place to start to learn where and how often..... these forums can offer more detailed help if you need it.........

But I would never shoot my pistol "with no lube" , but that's just me YMMV.
I do understand what MGMike was trying to point out .....we just differ slightly in the methods :D

JF.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,914 Posts
Sniper: Okay, to avoid setting everyone's teeth on edge, I should have said "no ADDITIONAL lube". New guns always come from the factory with SOME lube on them, and firing 50 rounds through a new gun is not going to do anything more than knock off the burrs and scrub some blue or parkerizing off the contact surfaces. It's not as bad as it may sound--you'll see the same wear in a new gun after a couple hundred rounds no matter how much you lube it.

I have several pistols in my collection that were subjected to a 1,000 rd. test straight out of the box, and they really don't look any different inside than others that were babied; any parts that were gouged, chattered or severely worn were not properly fitted in the first place, and would have had to be replaced in any case.

I think we can agree that an automobile engine is not a good analogy. I doubt if one could get a semi-automatic pistol hot enough without lubrication to burn it up or cause metallurgical damage.

In extreme cold, even machine guns are routinely run without oil, or they would not run at all. That might accelerate wear, but apprently not to an unacceptable level.

In general, I am inclined to think that for most small arms, lubrication serves more to ensure smooth functioning than to prevent wear, but I suppose that is debatable as well.

M
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
333 Posts
M-- I understood the point you were making .....and said so . I can tell you are an experienced shooter and gun owner........ but we must remember that many who read our posts are very new to firearm ownership and take what it said on these forums very literally. So a misplaced word can have damaging results in some cases. I was not trying to jump on your post ......as a matter of fact I hate people who do that; as a sort of sport. I can assure you, I had NO such intentions !! If you took it that way -- I appologize for not being more clear with my intentions.

The fact is -- all new firearms should be thoroughly cleaned out of the box to remove "factory storage protection" which is sometimes much too thick as a shooting lubrication. Then the firearm should be re-lubricated with the appropriate gun oils. Many times the barrels of new pistols have WAY to much oil or "gunk" in them to just take out and fire them straight away !
There are exceptions to this general rule : Glock puts a special copper colored grease on their pistol's rails system which should NOT be removed - out of the box. The manual will clearly state this.

Again, my post was in response to what you wrote .....and not what you meant.........
I am guilty of typing too fast........ all the time ;)

Be safe !!

JF.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,914 Posts
Sniper: No need for any apology; your posts were entirely proper, and your points well taken. I write a lot of things that probably sound rash, mostly because I'm too impatient or lazy to append all the necessary provisos and qualifications.

The extent and type of factory lubrication is really brand-specific. Some brands come slathered in icky grease that absolutely deters any out-of-the-box handling, let alone shooting. Others have been sprayed with oil that, as you have said, is too thick for smooth and reliable functioning. Walthers and some others generally can be shot "as is" without harm if one is of a mind to do so, unless the gun's been sitting around a long time and the oil has coagulated. Most manuals unfortunately are not very specific about exactly where to lubricate, or with what. Glock is a notable and welcome exception--they are VERY specific.

In any event you are entirely correct that most guns WILL benefit from an initial cleaning and re-lubrication. Admission: I do it myself-- but then most of the guns I acquire are not new, and I won't shoot any used gun without a thorough internal inspection, cleaning and lubrication (often with different types of lube at different points).

I put a coat of grease on the locking/unlocking cams, a light grease film on inside of the slide at the muzzle where the barrel bears and on the back of the slide where it rocks back the hammer, as well as a dab on the disconnector; a couple drops of synthetic oil on the frame rails, a light oil film on the hammer face and on the barrel & slide locking surfaces. Then assemble, cycle it as few times, field-strip, wipe off the excess, then reassemble.

M
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,343 Posts
I disagree. It is always a good idea to clean and lube a new gun before U shoot it the first time.

I've heard too many stories of people who didn't and the gun didn't work right. Then they clean it and go back for the 2nd time and it works right.

Plus, some guns, like Hks, have packing grease on them too. U need to clean that stuff off.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top