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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
as a healthy 76 yr. old 17mos. shooter, I had been making pretty good progress.


Lately have had some sorry range sessions....think I am losing my confidence, which is not good. Having trouble holding muzzle on the target thru the trigger pull.


Anyone had this occur....and comments, advice appreciated
 

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I am only 67 but it happens with poor range sessions from time to time.

Are you sure you have not developed a flinching issue? Does the same happen during dry fire? I like to dry fire with a LaserLyte 9MM training cartridge which also makes it more fun with instant feedback. Having any caffeine before going to the range?

https://www.amazon.com/LaserLyte-trainer-cartridge-training-centered/dp/B004NKY23E
 
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Shooting is a progression like anything you do.
Does the best baseball players go 3 for 4 with a homer every game? No
A bad day(s) at the range is motivation.
 

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If I'm having a bad range session, I usually pack up and head home and come back a couple days later. You'd be surprised how your subconscious can affect your performance. Unfortunately, I can't do that during a competition and that takes me DAYS to get over.
 

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I typically shoot twice a week and have had days where it just doesn’t feel right. I can’t put my finger on the what it is but it Im just off. I will usually switch pistols and it’s gets better. There’s so much going on in all of our lives that it could as simple as your head is somewhere else, even if it’s sub consciously.
 

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I've never had it not occur...I just blame the gun...or the ammo. Usually both. Nothing gets easier as you get older....cept forgetting stuff. I'm still minute of man....but barely. 1917
 

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Katie m'boy, we talked elsewhere here. You are older than me, tho' not by much...but I've been at it awhile.
Let's begin in the beginning. What kind of sights does your pistol have? How well can you actually see them? Big sights with contrast (white dots, etc.) are a help.
Do I remember you having a 1911? That's a lot of gun to start out. Ammo is pricey, and the recoil isn't inconsequential. How is the trigger?
Do you have a .22? One with a decent trigger and sights? I'd suggest a .22 conversion for your .45, but they can be cranky.

With your current gun, what happens with dry snap practice? Can you keep the sights aligned and on target when the hammer falls?
Moon
 
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I can highly recommend an indoor training product called Laserlyte to help anyone with their trigger pull issues. It is a battery operated target with sensors in it. A laser cartridge is loaded into your firearm that projects a beam every time the firing pin strikes it. The target will memorize 5 beam strike locations, which can be revealed at any time or erased.

This product is worth it weight in gold and will help anyone tighten up their grip and trigger pulls at any distance of their choosing.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Better now

Katie m'boy, we talked elsewhere here. You are older than me, tho' not by much...but I've been at it awhile.
Let's begin in the beginning. What kind of sights does your pistol have? How well can you actually see them? Big sights with contrast (white dots, etc.) are a help.
Do I remember you having a 1911? That's a lot of gun to start out. Ammo is pricey, and the recoil isn't inconsequential. How is the trigger?
Do you have a .22? One with a decent trigger and sights? I'd suggest a .22 conversion for your .45, but they can be cranky.

With your current gun, what happens with dry snap practice? Can you keep the sights aligned and on target when the hammer falls?
Moon

Finally found that I was not gripping pistol and presenting to target as I had been....just came to me at range today. shot much better...especially my RiA 1911 which is chambered in 9mm....trigger is great.


When dry firing with snap cap, I can keep sights aligned and on target when hammer falls.
 

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as a healthy 76 yr. old 17mos. shooter, I had been making pretty good progress.


Lately have had some sorry range sessions....think I am losing my confidence, which is not good. Having trouble holding muzzle on the target thru the trigger pull.


Anyone had this occur....and comments, advice appreciated

I am the same age and started shooting the Colt 1911 / 45 over fifty years ago. I am a good shooter and have been for many years. I sometimes experience the same problem and recognize that I am not as steady as I used to be at acquiring and holding the target. In my mind it has nothing to do with confidence. It has more to do with age. I have really good shooting days and some days, not so good.


As Toby Keith sang, "I ain't as good as I once was, but I'm as good once as I ever was".
 

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I was pleased to read that you had only misplaced your MOJO and that it wasn't lost.


At 72, I've found that I need to train differently than the younger shooters at the range. For example, I need to cut my morning coffee consumption by half with my last cup 2 hours before range time.


I've also found that eating something non-sugary a half hour before rangetime helps drive the shakes away. I make sure that I am hydrated by drinking a half bottle of water with the Wendy's Jr. Cheeseburger Deluxe I bought and ate on the way to the range. I leave that half drunk bottle in the car to drink before driving home, but have another in my range bag to sip during breaks because dehydration leads to the shakes.



When shooting, I don't load a bunch of mags and only use one per gun, but have a spare in my bag just in case. I like to take my time executing my shooting plan and examining the results after each magazine. I find that loading the magazine gives me time to think, to shake off any stress, and to ward off any muscle fatigue.


Shooting is a wonderful sport for all of us, and I feel blessed that I can still have a great time at the range at my age.
 

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Katie, I'd forgotten you had a 9mm 1911; that's definitely a help.
I didn't ask; are you using two hands? What sort of targets are you engaging? At what distance?
Moon
 

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Another training aid that will zero in on any significant departure from fundamentals is the Mantis. It is a transducer that attaches to the pistol (bottom of magazine if no other place to attach) and after you fire it shows you (in color) your movement just before firing, during fireing, and what recoil looks like - all in 2D. Display can be on a tablet or cell phone having Bluetooth. With a bit of care, it can even work with dryfire. (trick is that the pistol needs to be pointed up when racking so that racking is not interpreted as a shot)

Some older and also strength-limited shooters have found that a lighter pistol works better.
 

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At 76, I have random aches and pains that I didn't have at 66 or 56. If I have a shoulder ache from an old torn rotator cup when I get out of bed in the morning or any nagging pain, I take a couple of Ibuprofen tablets before I go to the shooting range. It makes a difference for me to be pain free when I am shooting.


I can't relate to not drinking coffee before shooting. I drink coffee from when I get up until bedtime. I have found it important to relax my mind and discard unpleasant thoughts before shooting. You can pick the thoughts up when you are through shooting. When I was much younger, I could shoot a decent round of golf if I had one beer before the round of golf. It took the edge off and allowed me to relax. I don't suggest drinking before shooting, but I do recommend finding a way to relax before shooting.


I like to watch really good shooters at the range. The single thing that seems to be common when they are shooting well is their level of relaxation while shooting. They all seem to have little routines they follow before shooting and while shooting to relax. They do things to relax small muscle groups in their hands and other things to relax their bodies.
 

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In the old .38 revolver league, folks were known to stop at a bar down the street for a 'group tightener' before coming to the range to shoot.
Relaxation takes many forms!
OTOH, one of our Junior Program kids had an energy drink before last year's tournament. He'd have been better served with the whiskey.

Moon
 
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In the old .38 revolver league, folks were known to stop at a bar down the street for a 'group tightener' before coming to the range to shoot.
Relaxation takes many forms!
OTOH, one of our Junior Program kids had an energy drink before last year's tournament. He'd have been better served with the whiskey.

Moon
I lament, just a little, the loss of the "good old days", when having a drink now and then wasn't given the same social negativity level as child molestation. It reminds me of the song, "Alice's Restaurant", where Arlo Guthrie sings about being on the "group W" bench, and telling the fellow draftees that he was arrested for littering, and the guys all move away from him on the bench. Today, if you have a drink and drive home, or have a drink and go shooting or hunting, you are a misfit. 30 or 40 years ago, nobody cared. One drink? Two drinks? No one want to admit that we have gone a bit overboard, knee jerking, and letting the influence of M.A.D.D. get to the point of absurdity. Are they doing the same in Europe, now, copying us, or are they still drinking socially and being mature and responsible about it, like THEY did 40 years ago? We had a shooting near here (Akron, Ohio), where a guy went into a "cop bar", and shot and killed a police office for no known reason. All the cops disarmed so they could imbibe, and then were unable to respond. I hear they now have a "designated shooter" when they drink (he is probably the designated driver, too). Political correctness is just a tad over the top these days. Or is it just me........:(
 

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In the old .38 revolver league, folks were known to stop at a bar down the street for a 'group tightener' before coming to the range to shoot.
Relaxation takes many forms!
OTOH, one of our Junior Program kids had an energy drink before last year's tournament. He'd have been better served with the

Moon
In my 20’s-30’s I was an avid dart shooter and there was a definite sweet spot where just enough and you shot great. Too much and you got sloppy.

And yes I know darts and guns are vastly different but both involve hand eye coordination.
 

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Funny you should mention darts...an old buddy and I played double on/double off English darts. We did a not terribly scientific study of how many beers produced peak results.
Back to shooting; three fingers of Jameson isn't a viable way to settle down to shoot, but relaxing and not over stressing is a help.
Moon
 
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