Walther Forums banner

21 - 33 of 33 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,187 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,069 Posts
Here are two videos, one showing Hickok45 shooting the P99 and Miculek shooting the M&P 2.0. Note that neither uses added weight of any kind and yet can perform multiple shots in quick succession with accuracy.

I just want to say that while I have no axe to grind in this discussion, both of those guys have been shooting competitively more years than I've been alive and I'd reckon they have a handle (pun very intended!) on things, specifically pistols. LOL.

And I'm 21, with 21 years experience. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
243 Posts
Depending on the class he's competing in, Jerry isn't allowed such things as lights on the gun.

In this video he's shooting his Open Class M&P (0:30) - so anything goes. He running a light to "add a little bit of weight to it".


I personally don't want a gun-mounted light and the increased bulk and weight, but I would expect additional weight in that location to reduce muzzle flip to some degree. I would also expect it to have different degrees of effectiveness depending on the caliber and load.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,334 Posts
I just want to say that while I have no axe to grind in this discussion, both of those guys have been shooting competitively more years than I've been alive and I'd reckon they have a handle (pun very intended!) on things, specifically pistols.
You are correct. The important question is....did they start their shooting using lights or other weight addition materials to control recoil or did they learn to control recoil for those rapid repetitive shots using no more than the pistol out of the box? I have viewed many videos made by shooters whose names I have never seen or read who are able to control recoil across a variety of pistols and shoot both rapidly and accurately.

I am not opposed to adding weight or using other physical means to control recoil. I experimented with added weight just to see if it really made a difference.....it did nothing for me. I have also used recoil reduction RSA's and still have the DPM in my PPQ 45 and XDs 3.3 45.

Here's one last video made by one of those shooters I have not heard of before. Interesting and informative at the very least.

 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,334 Posts
Found an interesting video this morning that I believe begins to provide some amount of objective measurement to questions re recoil and muzzle motion/flip. Obviously this video still involves the human element but is a step closer. In particular as it relates to the OP's question the last segment shows a comparison between the basic Glock and the same Glock with an added light.



Legally Armed America is about to introduce even more objective measures related to recoil. I am including a second video that describes the mechanical and electronic testing they plan to do.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,299 Posts
Discussion Starter #27
Found an interesting video this morning that I believe begins to provide some amount of objective measurement to questions re recoil and muzzle motion/flip. Obviously this video still involves the human element but is a step closer. In particular as it relates to the OP's question the last segment shows a comparison between the basic Glock and the same Glock with an added light.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZOqGBrIl-KA


Legally Armed America is about to introduce even more objective measures related to recoil. I am including a second video that describes the mechanical and electronic testing they plan to do.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pjExFEUtRYo
The first guy has a terrible grip and stance. Using the old Weaver stance is not conducive to recoil control nor it is the thumb over thumb grip he is using. I could not watch the second guy cause he is too mouthy and needs to shut up and get to the point.
I just put a tungsten recoil guide in the P 99 pistol and can tell you that it is no longer muzzle. Light. Looking forward to shooting it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,299 Posts
Discussion Starter #28
Depending on the class he's competing in, Jerry isn't allowed such things as lights on the gun.

In this video he's shooting his Open Class M&P (0:30) - so anything goes. He running a light to "add a little bit of weight to it".

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0dOVZ5TRCUw

I personally don't want a gun-mounted light and the increased bulk and weight, but I would expect additional weight in that location to reduce muzzle flip to some degree. I would also expect it to have different degrees of effectiveness depending on the caliber and load.
Lights are legal in IDPA as are red dots. SPD class.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,334 Posts
The first guy has a terrible grip and stance. Using the old Weaver stance is not conducive to recoil control nor it is the thumb over thumb grip he is using.
As long as technique is consistent the electronic system will provide a bit of objectivity in answering the question.

I could not watch the second guy cause he is too mouthy and needs to shut up and get to the point.
That video was included to provide information re an enhanced objective test bed that will be able to provide even more reliable data since it totally removes the human element.

The hope is that when the question re muzzle rise and control arises we could provide more objective responses.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,299 Posts
Discussion Starter #31
Does your light have to work? If not, remove the battery and replace it with a battery sized chunk of lead, or brass, or .............
Since matches are shot it daylight - what do you think?
Actually the tungsten guide rod weighs much more than a TLR 7 light; and I am thinking about removing the light as the guide rod destroys the muzzle light feeling and gives the pistol a much better balance in my hand. Let you know how well I do with it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,299 Posts
Discussion Starter #32
As long as technique is consistent the electronic system will provide a bit of objectivity in answering the question.



That video was included to provide information re an enhanced objective test bed that will be able to provide even more reliable data since it totally removes the human element.

The hope is that when the question re muzzle rise and control arises we could provide more objective responses.
True but there has been so much howling about good grip and stance being the panacea solution of all muzzle flip problems it was rather shocking to see someone with neither measuring recoil.
Too much unnecessary verbiage for me on the second vid. I could not watch all of it.
 
21 - 33 of 33 Posts
Top