Walther Forums banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay, I bought this new in 91 and prolly have <1000 rounds through it.

With a history of infrequent stove pipes - a few FTEB's - running a variety of flavor ammo. And of course the JHP usually Fn'g without issue.

My query is, should this have a "Spring refresh" including the recoil spring and etc?

Thanks...
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
629 Posts
You can try whatever you think might help with issues. Doing nothing won't change anything. I would also look into the magazine use itself and see if there could be a problem with that.

So when do the failers occur? Any particular round count and do you load 6 + 1 in the chamber? And are you also saying that you have zero issues with JHP ammo?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
You can try whatever you think might help with issues. Doing nothing won't change anything. I would also look into the magazine use itself and see if there could be a problem with that.

So when do the failers occur? Any particular round count and do you load 6 + 1 in the chamber? And are you also saying that you have zero issues with JHP ammo?
I have experienced poor results with "6+1" configuration and no longer attempt...

The JHP have had the best results with minimal FTB or "SP" phenomena...

I also do not load my own ammo; at the price of .380, though, I prolly should~

Good tip for the magazine Springs...

I think I will purchase the Wolf "Spring Refresh kit" which includes everything incl the mag springs...

Any experience with their products ?

Thanks,
Randy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
629 Posts
Usually hollow points are the reported issues because the original design did not take hollow points into account (as they did not exist yet), however, since you don't appear to be having issues with hollow points for the most part, I am inclined to guess that yor are either limp wristing the weapon or the recoil spring may be too stiff as well as a mag spring issue. The JHP rounds (especially self defense) use higher pressure powders and that extra force seems to give you better results. Each Walther is unique in what it likes to eat. Yours may like hotter loads.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Usually hollow points are the reported issues because the original design did not take hollow points into account (as they did not exist yet), however, since you don't appear to be having issues with hollow points for the most part, I am inclined to guess that yor are either limp wristing the weapon or the recoil spring may be too stiff as well as a mag spring issue. The JHP rounds (especially self defense) use higher pressure powders and that extra force seems to give you better results. Each Walther is unique in what it likes to eat. Yours may like hotter loads.
Okay, I appreciate your comments. And I also agree with "limp wrist" issue. As I have not consistently made effort towards proficiency with this auto...

Also agree with the premise that the "round nosed" projectiles are more suited to the feed ramp for which it is designed...

Will try again with the JHP's in which grain weight would you suggest to start with?

Thanks...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
629 Posts
I don't think weight or grain is the issue. I think that a spring somewhere is too stiff and coupled with possible limp wristing, that is what is causing the issues. To properly diagnose, I would have to examine the weapon and mags. I wouldn't rush to swap out all of the springs. Start simple and work your way up. Go back to round nose and try a solid grip. If all goes well, then you know the problem. If they still have issues, then do the JHP. If they feed flawlessly with a solid grip, then I would say that you will need hotter loads or to lighten a spring somewhere (which would best be diagnosed by a competent gun smith in your area).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I don't think weight or grain is the issue. I think that a spring somewhere is too stiff and coupled with possible limp wristing, that is what is causing the issues. To properly diagnose, I would have to examine the weapon and mags. I wouldn't rush to swap out all of the springs. Start simple and work your way up. Go back to round nose and try a solid grip. If all goes well, then you know the problem. If they still have issues, then do the JHP. If they feed flawlessly with a solid grip, then I would say that you will need hotter loads or to lighten a spring somewhere (which would best be diagnosed by a competent gun smith in your area).
Will do, appreciate it...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,830 Posts
I agree with TheWatcher that your malfunctions are most likely due to limp wristing. That's not uncommon in a PPK .380. If you haven't already done so I would also recommend that you mark your magazines. That way if it is a magazine problem you will be able to identify which one is the culprit. A black Sharpie or silver paint pen should work fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I agree with TheWatcher that your malfunctions are most likely due to limp wristing. That's not uncommon in a PPK .380. If you haven't already done so I would also recommend that you mark your magazines. That way if it is a magazine problem you will be able to identify which one is the culprit. A black Sharpie or silver paint pen should work fine.
That is a great idea, much appreciated !

Thanks...
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,510 Posts
Since Mike hasn't piped up, I will.
Check the sticky posted here on feeding issues, and diagnosing same.
Hint...replacing springs isn't the place to start.
Also, the PP platform in .380 is just a picky eater. Grip can be one of the causes.
Moon
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Spring replacement

Generally, I recommend changing recoil spring at 1000-1500 rounds in most semi autos. Change main spring at 4000-5000.
This is more critical in short recoil guns and can cause cracked frames in alloy frames.
I recommend it to my customers with an annual cleaning so all they have to pay extra is the parts and springs are cheap.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Generally, I recommend changing recoil spring at 1000-1500 rounds in most semi autos. Change main spring at 4000-5000.
This is more critical in short recoil guns and can cause cracked frames in alloy frames.
I recommend it to my customers with an annual cleaning so all they have to pay extra is the parts and springs are cheap.
Thank you, noted...
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,510 Posts
All due respect, Diancello, but frequent recoil spring changes are not the conventional wisdom here.
Moon
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top