Walther Forums banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Greetings - I'm the proud new owner of a very cool 1940 PP, Eagle over N, non-military PP. Great shape! I'll post photos shortly.

Meanwhile, as I JUST got it, I thought I'd remove the grips. To my consternation, the screw has a very narrow slot for the screwdriver. My big fat American screwdrivers all have beefier blades than the screw can accept. I have one that 'almost' fits....it sort of fits....but I can tell, it might pop our of the slot once I put much pressure on it. I definitely don't want to mar the screw.

So, how do you guys do it? Did you source a narrow-blade screwdriver?

Please advise.

thanks much -

Richard
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,411 Posts
Hard to give a specific answer; but what you need are hollow-ground screwdrivers.
The sides of the blades are concave, and the notion is that the screwdriver will work in the bottom of the slot, not damage the top.

Moon
 
  • Like
Reactions: mpgus

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,119 Posts
You might want to order a set of screwdrivers made especially for firearms, etc. Regular flat blade tools begin to taper wider immediately. Screwdrivers made for removing slotted screws without damage do not flare near the edge. Brownells and others have them...they aren't especially expensive. The best description might be to say they are hollow ground similar to what you might see on a knife. This way the blade does not apply undue pressure to the top edge of the screw slot.

Any number of places sell them. 1917

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
323 Posts
A good set of gunsmithing screwdrivers is one of the best investments you can make. If just for removing the grips and that's the only use you're going to put it to, I'd get a thin carpenter's screwdriver before investing $100 in a set, but I use the screwdrivers for lots of gunsmithing tasks. If you ever decide to do anything to a gun that requires a screwdriver, gunsmith screwdrivers are a must.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
You might want to order a set of screwdrivers made especially for firearms, etc. Regular flat blade tools begin to taper wider immediately. Screwdrivers made for removing slotted screws without damage do not flare near the edge. Brownells and others have them...they aren't especially expensive. The best description might be to say they are hollow ground similar to what you might see on a knife. This way the blade does not apply undue pressure to the top edge of the screw slot.

Any number of places sell them. 1917

Thanks! I just bought the Weaver's set.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,119 Posts
And if you are going to be working on firearms....just go ahead and order tools made for the work. Brass drifts, bench block, small machinists vice with face protection, roll pin drift with a small tit in the middle to keep the punch centered on the pin, small brass/nylon hammer, etc. Good light and a good work bench. And remember....always, always...make sure the firearm is unloaded and ammo is put away from the work area unless you need one round for something. 1917
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Well, Amazon just delivered this tool set.


NONE of the bits fit my screw slot. And the overall quality was mediocre. It's being returned immediately.

So, I still need a tool to unscrew these grips. It sounds like a very simple goal, and yet the slot on these grips is very narrow. Oddly so. So, I need to find the right tool.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
323 Posts
Get a large set of gunsmith screwdrivers; they'll have a bit that will fit. You can't spend too much on screwdrivers, IMO.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,119 Posts
Well that must be a sorry set if nothing fits the screw. I don't remember them being completely odd in size...the screw that is. I believe most of the larger gun shops around here have screwdriver sets. What you are looking for is a blade that does not begin to taper thicker, as a wedge would, so that when you are loosening or tightening you aren't putting pressure on the outer edge of the screw slot only. That is what caused the damage you commonly see. It is getting harder and harder to find good tools. You might try Brownells, which is a gun supply shop with a huge catalog. You can likely search on line. There is another good one....but I can't think of the name presently. I'm old. 1917
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Well that must be a sorry set if nothing fits the screw. I don't remember them being completely odd in size...the screw that is.
I hear you....the PP grip screw has an very thin slot. There were a couple of bits in the set that were thin enough, but they were not wide enough. There were plenty that were wide enough, but those were too thick.

There is a 8-piece Grace set that looks promising.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,119 Posts
I think the good news is that most of those grip screws are not really very tight. Props for wanting to do a job right and with the correct tools. There needs to be more of that going around.

Bit #120-1, SD=.120, BT=.020 : BROWNELLS MAGNA-TIP® THIN-BITS | Brownells Brownells sells individual blades as well as sets. I don't know what the proper blade width and thickness is for the grips. Would be easy to put a caliper on some and figure it out. The main thing is to understand that there is no taper on the working end of a gunsmith screwdriver blade. The whole tip of the blade drops into and all the way to the bottom of the slot. 1917
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
I agree with 1917, Brownell does not only have standard hollow grown sets but the thin-set bits as well. I ordered 5 of them for early Snith&Wesson revolvers, very thin and perfect for those needs. You may have to look closely or call them, they are very helpful but they can probably handle your needs. If the screws seem tight soak them in penetrating oil or a solvent first.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,119 Posts
MGMike would say check the FAQ section....but, I don't think there is any information up there regarding the size of the grip screws. If I get a chance I will see if a proper fitting gunsmith bade has any numbers on it or perhaps put a micrometer on one. 1917
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top