Walther Forums banner
1 - 20 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is this an L66A1? Serial 40810, .22lr, 1975 manufactured. Has Ulm proof in ejection port. It has a single Koblenz proof on the frame and appears to have been parkerized then painted with Suncorite. No “P” on the rear of slide. No import marks and the box has an NSN sticker on the front. Just curious because this doesn’t exactly match what a normal L66A1 has for markings.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,692 Posts
You've answered your question yourself: It's not a L66A1 because of the proof.
If we may help to identify, please show us good pictures of the marking on the frame left side.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,692 Posts
...and what is a NSN sticker?

What he meant is the proof mark on the frame, could(!!) be 'Güteprüfdienst des Bundesverteidigungsministeriums'.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
An NSN is a NATO Stock Number, a 13 digit number that identifies standardized material items across NATO. The sticker also has the SN for the gun on it. And it looks like Güteprüfdienstes des Bundesverteidigungsministeriums proof with a 27 under the wings to me. The serial is also just before the recognized range for the L66A1 so I wondered if this was an early acquired gun that did not receive all the normal markings.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,692 Posts
The shortcut was unknown to me.
The gun shows a standard German proof (Ulm, 1975) on the barrel seat, standard eagle on the slide and one lonely eagle w. drooping wings? Why shows the frame both types of proof? Hard to believe that this pistol left the factory this way. Looks like someone tried out a new stamp.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
British military pistol No. L66A1 in .22LR and fall in the range of 41693 to 45088 serial numbers. They bear no British proof marks, or any other marks of British issue. Unlike commercial Walther's, they were not proofed at Ulm and lack a date code and antler stamp. Instead, they were proofed at the West German military proof house at Koblenz - and no I do not know what this looks like either. 40810 serial No. pre-dates the number range so am suspecting this is not as suspected. As ever there are variations and wanabies... The L66A1 was used by the UDR (Ulster Defence Regiment) in Ulster during the 'difficulties' from 1974 to 1989.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
I own two of these puppies and love them both for accuracy and reliability. They are better than any 'ordinary' .220 PPs or PPKs I have had. One has been Suncorited and one is as new in blue. This one shown here just doesn't look right... the Koblenz proof is 'off' somehow and the finish is way wrong. The markings on mine are sharp and clear. I will add some to the history: when the Brits were done with these they were sent to England and FTRd and sold to Interarms. No one kept track of gun/box relationships so, not unlike Artillery Colts, the box SN do NOT match the gun SN. One of mine has a lanyard, one does not. Both have the double Koblenz mark... I have never seen one with antlers. This one is wrong on several counts (SN - SN on box - proofs - NO Interarms import mark - no P - all but illegible markings) and would appear to be a fake.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I own two of these puppies and love them both for accuracy and reliability. They are better than any 'ordinary' .220 PPs or PPKs I have had. One has been Suncorited and one is as new in blue. This one shown here just doesn't look right... the Koblenz proof is 'off' somehow and the finish is way wrong. The markings on mine are sharp and clear. I will add some to the history: when the Brits were done with these they were sent to England and FTRd and sold to Interarms. No one kept track of gun/box relationships so, not unlike Artillery Colts, the box SN do NOT match the gun SN. One of mine has a lanyard, one does not. Both have the double Koblenz mark... I have never seen one with antlers. This one is wrong on several counts (SN - SN on box - proofs - NO Interarms import mark - no P - all but illegible markings) and would appear to be a fake.
The box itself is not matching, just this NSN sticker is all that’s matching, the suncorite, to me looks correct to other examples I’ve seen, doesn’t seem like it would be worth faking a relatively unknown gun, acquired it from a family member who had it for years, said he bought it in the 90’s from a gun show
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Hi, please see my comments regarding serial numbers, 40810 predates the known range of serial numbers of 41693 to 45088. It's a nice civilian PP - IMHO!
Where did this serial number range come from? Dieter Marschall uses an example in the 37,000 range in his book as an L66A1, so I’m wondering where this serial number range came from. Additionally, it appears that the example in his book is only suncorite finished and does not have German Federal proofs, at least on the left side of the frame.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,692 Posts
In Germany we would say 'Doppeltgemoppelt', means we found different proof marks mixed up and uncompleted. Really unnormal!
'Güteprüfdienst' would marked double(!) on the frame (and sharp and clean). And no Ulm proof!
It is what it is: A pimped civilian .22LR...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
In Germany we would say 'Doppeltgemoppelt', means we found different proof marks mixed up and uncompleted. Really unnormal!
'Güteprüfdienst' would marked double(!) on the frame (and sharp and clean). And no Ulm proof!
It is what it is: A pimped civilian .22LR...
Not to beat a dead horse, but would that make this ‘Doppeltgemoppelt’ as well? This pistol is nearly the same as mine minus the “P” and import mark. Only one federal proof and commercial proofs. Could be that this serial number range may be incorrect, looks like the early L66A1 may have retained commercial proofs.

 
1 - 20 of 31 Posts
Top