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I thought I would start a thread about something OTHER than the recall. :D

I love the P5, so please don't send a bunch of hateful comments based upon the title. The title was designed to get your attention.

The P5 is an elegant weapon, well-made and machined. It was ahead of its time when Walther developed it and entered it in the mid-1970s German Police Trials.

The P5, the SIG P6 (variation of the P225) and the HK P7 became authorized police pistols. And, while the P6 may have been used in more German states, it was not by much, and the P5 certainly got more notoriety, being used in not one, but two, James Bond movies released the same year. Roger Moore used the P5 in Octo*****, and Sean Connery used the P5 in Never Say Never Again, a remake of Thunderball.

That said, it occurred to me that the PPS with its 8 round magazine fills the same niche as the P5 did 35 years ago.

The PPS M2 holds 9 rounds (8+1), it is MUCH thinner, and thereby more concealable than the P5, and it takes up about the same real estate as the P5.

Had Q issued the PPS M2 with its 8 round magazine to James Bond then (or now), I just cannot see how the spy could have had much to complain about.

Most people think of the PPS M2 as a competitor to the Glock 43, but I think it ALSO fills the single stack duty size 9mm market - in other words - it will do nicely as the modern-day version of the P5, and will compete against the SIG P225, the HK P7, and the other 8-round duty weapons out there (Except the SIG 210).

What do you think?
 

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You forgot the sig p239. Very close to size and same round capacity.
Do you have a p239? I had one, and find the PPS to be significantly smaller and lighter. Maybe I had one of the really old fat ones? It was closer in size to my Gen 4 Glock 19 than to my PPS M2.
 

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I thought I would start a thread about something OTHER than the recall. :D

I love the P5, so please don't send a bunch of hateful comments based upon the title. The title was designed to get your attention.

The P5 is an elegant weapon, well-made and machined. It was ahead of its time when Walther developed it and entered it in the mid-1970s German Police Trials.

The P5, the SIG P6 (variation of the P225) and the HK P7 became authorized police pistols. And, while the P6 may have been used in more German states, it was not by much, and the P5 certainly got more notoriety, being used in not one, but two, James Bond movies released the same year. Roger Moore used the P5 in Octo*****, and Sean Connery used the P5 in Never Say Never Again, a remake of Thunderball.

That said, it occurred to me that the PPS with its 8 round magazine fills the same niche as the P5 did 35 years ago.

The PPS M2 holds 9 rounds (8+1), it is MUCH thinner, and thereby more concealable than the P5, and it takes up about the same real estate as the P5.

Had Q issued the PPS M2 with its 8 round magazine to James Bond then (or now), I just cannot see how the spy could have had much to complain about.

Most people think of the PPS M2 as a competitor to the Glock 43, but I think it ALSO fills the single stack duty size 9mm market - in other words - it will do nicely as the modern-day version of the P5, and will compete against the SIG P225, the HK P7, and the other 8-round duty weapons out there (Except the SIG 210).

What do you think?
No, I think you are looking at two different things.

The P-5/P-6/P-7 were designed to be compact service pistols of bigger caliber and safer than the PPs most of the German police were armed with but not particularly concealable, although they could be. I'd equate this with something more akin to a single-stack Glock19, rather than a PPK-equivalent. I don't feel the P-5 was ever James Bond-worthy. Walther used those two films as marketing opportunities, and the producers allowed the nonsense, because free, new pistols, and possibly some cash. Of the 3 P-series pistols, the P-7 was smallest, and had a fixed barrel, so suppressing would be much easier.

007 needs something concealable, a.k.a. the PPK/Beretta. In my opinion, the PPS is the modern equivalent to the PPK, but in a bigger caliber and bigger package (dimensions). I feel the PPS is a smaller package than the P-5, but I don't have a P-5 to compare it with... 7+1 rounds of 9mm in the PPS is definitely worth paying the price of slightly bigger dimensions than the PPK (6+1 of 380 or 7+1? of 32). Overall, though, yes, the PPS is definitely a concealable, compact package worthy of 007.

Now, if one considers that Bond himself liked the Beretta, and we use that to open up other brands of pistols, the Sig P365 must be high on the list, as would be the Glock 43.
 

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I have both. Love my P5, carry my PPS M2.


To answer your question--Um, no, not even close. They feel different, they shoot different, they are different.
 

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I was impressed the first time I handled a P5. Been grabbing all the nice/reasonably priced P5s I've come across (up to 7 now). The P5 is widely regarded as the finest production handgun Walther has ever produced (dropping block design, clearances/tolerances, fit and finish...). The PPS is nice, just not AS nice.
 

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You forgot the sig p239. Very close to size and same round capacity.
Do you have a p239? I had one, and find the PPS to be significantly smaller and lighter. Maybe I had one of the really old fat ones? It was closer in size to my Gen 4 Glock 19 than to my PPS M2.
Yes i own one and a pps m2. The pps is lighter due to it being a polymer frame. The length of the 239 is slightly longer. Width is about a 1/4 inch thicker. They are both great handguns.
 

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Going on a bit of a tangent here, but I wish I knew older firearms better. That way I would know whether to chase and buy an older firearm or not.

-- Mark
 

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An odd comparison, these guns share next to nothing in common other than single-stack 9 mm and a Walther roll mark. For concealed carry, the choice is obvious. For retro-cool hammer-fired bliss, the choice is obvious. Plus, the P5 has the perk of flipping brass toward the guy on your left, thus causing much confusion during range trips. Win-win :)
 
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