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Nice. I had a p7 for a short time. It was beautifully unique but ultimately too different from my other pistols which resulted in it sitting in the safe... so I sold it for a fancy guitar. I will probably regret that one day. But not yet.

Right now, I have a couple USPs and an Expert, in addition to the Walthers and a few Rugers. I qualified as instructor with the Expert even though it’s grip is too wide for my hand. It’s silly accurate despite its crappy front sight. I’m debating about whether to put a Holosun on it... all I would have to do is put the dot on the bad guy but I would need to mill the slide in order to do it. Decisions, decisions.

See, I didn’t know that ‘a lot’ meant more than ‘sufficient’ because you stated that it didn’t seem like my guns got ‘a lot’ of range time, then I said they got ‘sufficient’ time, then I asked about your guns range time and you said they got ‘enough’ time. So, does ‘sufficient’ = ‘enough’ but ‘a lot’ > ‘sufficient’? I’m suddenly having flashbacks to my college differential equations class, lol.
 

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Well, ask yourself this: are there better, more reliable designs out there, that cost less, weigh less, are smaller, more comfortable to shoot, not picky about ammo, are chambered for larger calibers, can be had everywhere at reasonable market prices -current sitch notwithstanding- with parts and customer service abundant?
Nailed it. That's exactly the situation.
 

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Is it me or does it seem that neither selling or buying of PPKs is happening as much? I know locally we have few for sale and when they are up, little demand. Didn't seem like that last year and earlier - or is it me?
not my impression. I can’t find any around here. I can get a PPK/s but I’d want a PPK in stainless steel.
but I’ve decided to get a PPS Classic first (if I can find that...)
 

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Well not been around in awhile, really sold off my entire collection and yes i miss all the German guns. just have a 1944 PPK rig still left.And i did buy one of the latest 2019 stainless PPK models and a PPK/S in 22 lr. that i figured i might suppress. {A dream}

I think the latest 2020 Fiasco has destroyed the fun in a lot of it now.But hey as we live everyday i still Hope! RON K.
 

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Well, I'm sure it's a sacrilege on this site, but for the money, I'm very happy with my Bersa Thunder 380. It's a PPK copy anyway...and up to one third the price of a German one (Argentina, uh, almost German ;)). Mine shoots great with no trigger issues. I installed fiber optic front sights and now it's better than before. Aftermarket mags hold 8 rounds.

93669
 

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Size of a smartphone, holds 6+1 rounds of 9mm HPs, isn't picky with ammo, slide can be racked easily, doesn't have a huge tail, and you can find one easily enough:



Ditto, but holds one round more in this config, weighs even less, and was half the price:

 

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Well I have owned and still own a lot of Glocks. I bought a 9 mm PPK Q5 Match. Finest weapon I have ever owned. Simply fantastic. I really don’t know how it could be improved. You pay for the quality. I know someone will say they are too expensive. With guns I really think you get what you pay for.
 

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My LGS sells every PPK they get pretty quickly. Last week they had a used S&W PPK/S and a new Ft.Smith PPK/S, both in .380. This week only the S&W remained and it won't last long.

I expect the current production PPK and PPK/S to remain in production for at least a few more years.
 

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Well, I’ve spent a lot of money over the last two years buying 1950s Manurhin/German made PPKs, PPs, and TPH models. So if my investment strategy is like most of my others, they probably have gone down in value 🤣. But I love them and I don’t care.
Besides this is a crazy time to try to predict anything, because no one really knows what is going to happen.
 

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I purchased my first Walther last year. It is a Ft. Smith PPK/S First Edition .380 in stainless steel. I love it! I got the First Edition because I stumbled across it at a gun show. I got stainless steel because I often carry in the field around or in saltwater. I wanted a PPK because it is a hammer fired, double action - single action with a very reliable safety and de-cocking mechanism.

I also have a Colt Mustang XSP .380 and a Sig P938 9 mm. I have frequently carried both of these. They are about the same size as, or smaller than, the PPK/S, but they are both single action only which means I carry them cocked-and-locked. I know they are both designed to be carried safely with the hammer cocked, but that always made me a little nervous. The PPK/S seemed the perfect solution.

I also like the fixed barrel on the PPK/S. I often go "marsh mucking" in the local swamps where (in Florida) there is a remote possibility that a rather large creature could pull you under water and try to eat you! About the only way to deal with such a situation is to press the barrel directly against the attacker and fire. If you tried that with any semi auto without a fixed barrel, you would be very disappointed. About the only thing that could make this pistol any better would be the same size PPK/S in 9 mm. We can only dream.

Unfortunately, my PPK experience has not been flawless. I had a problem with the hammer strut (also known as the safety strut) occasionally engaging to block the hammer from falling - not a good thing for a defensive weapon. Please understand that this only occurred under very specific circumstances, and Walther did solve the problem.

I typically shoot 200+ rounds per range session, and this problem usually occurred only after the first 100 rounds. The first time I sent it to Walther for repair, they replaced the hammer strut spring, fired two magazines of ammo (about 12 rounds), and called it good. Unfortunately, that did not solve the problem. I returned it to them again with a lengthy letter explaining the it still malfunctioned 17 times in 200 rounds. They again tested with two magazines and returned it to me with a notation that they found no problem. Please understand that I am not complaining about Walther service. They were actually very helpful, but they could not recreate the problem because they did not put enough rounds through it.

I called them about the problem, and they suggested that after 100+ rounds, it might just be "shooter fatigue" causing me to loosen my grip. I rejected this suggestion out right because I often fire 200+ rounds of .357 mag. or .40 S&W with no loss of precision, and I often fire 200+ rounds of .380 in my Colt Mustang XSP (which is much smaller and lighter than the PPK/S) with no problems or loss of precision. I again fired 200+ rounds with 23 failures after the first 100 rounds. I returned it for the third time. By this time, the end of the hammer strut was beginning to deform because of the soft stainless steel. They replaced the strut and everything seems to be fine.

Again, please understand that I am not complaining about Walther's service or the Ft. Smith PPK/S. They simply could not recreate the problem, and it is probably unreasonable to expect them to fire 100+ rounds trying. I suspect that the tolerance on the hammer strut was just a little too close, and once the pistol heated up, its movement became restricted enough to cause the malfunction. It is now fixed and I love this pistol.
 

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I purchased my first Walther last year. It is a Ft. Smith PPK/S First Edition .380 in stainless steel. I love it! I got the First Edition because I stumbled across it at a gun show. I got stainless steel because I often carry in the field around or in saltwater. I wanted a PPK because it is a hammer fired, double action - single action with a very reliable safety and de-cocking mechanism.

I also have a Colt Mustang XSP .380 and a Sig P938 9 mm. I have frequently carried both of these. They are about the same size as, or smaller than, the PPK/S, but they are both single action only which means I carry them cocked-and-locked. I know they are both designed to be carried safely with the hammer cocked, but that always made me a little nervous. The PPK/S seemed the perfect solution.

I also like the fixed barrel on the PPK/S. I often go "marsh mucking" in the local swamps where (in Florida) there is a remote possibility that a rather large creature could pull you under water and try to eat you! About the only way to deal with such a situation is to press the barrel directly against the attacker and fire. If you tried that with any semi auto without a fixed barrel, you would be very disappointed. About the only thing that could make this pistol any better would be the same size PPK/S in 9 mm. We can only dream.

Unfortunately, my PPK experience has not been flawless. I had a problem with the hammer strut (also known as the safety strut) occasionally engaging to block the hammer from falling - not a good thing for a defensive weapon. Please understand that this only occurred under very specific circumstances, and Walther did solve the problem.

I typically shoot 200+ rounds per range session, and this problem usually occurred only after the first 100 rounds. The first time I sent it to Walther for repair, they replaced the hammer strut spring, fired two magazines of ammo (about 12 rounds), and called it good. Unfortunately, that did not solve the problem. I returned it to them again with a lengthy letter explaining the it still malfunctioned 17 times in 200 rounds. They again tested with two magazines and returned it to me with a notation that they found no problem. Please understand that I am not complaining about Walther service. They were actually very helpful, but they could not recreate the problem because they did not put enough rounds through it.

I called them about the problem, and they suggested that after 100+ rounds, it might just be "shooter fatigue" causing me to loosen my grip. I rejected this suggestion out right because I often fire 200+ rounds of .357 mag. or .40 S&W with no loss of precision, and I often fire 200+ rounds of .380 in my Colt Mustang XSP (which is much smaller and lighter than the PPK/S) with no problems or loss of precision. I again fired 200+ rounds with 23 failures after the first 100 rounds. I returned it for the third time. By this time, the end of the hammer strut was beginning to deform because of the soft stainless steel. They replaced the strut and everything seems to be fine.

Again, please understand that I am not complaining about Walther's service or the Ft. Smith PPK/S. They simply could not recreate the problem, and it is probably unreasonable to expect them to fire 100+ rounds trying. I suspect that the tolerance on the hammer strut was just a little too close, and once the pistol heated up, its movement became restricted enough to cause the malfunction. It is now fixed and I love this pistol.
Good point about the fixed barrel. Those FL swamp creatures are unpredictable.

I too want a 9mm Ppk or ppks. Maybe Walther will make our dreams come true one day. I doubt it, but as said to the lil hobbits, hope remains.
 

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There is a tendency to attribute mystical properties to machined guns, or about anything made BC (before computers) but to me, this is strictly mythical. I say mythical because there is frequently no practical difference, if standards are high on the persons running the computers. This is the 21st century, the computer age, and you can buy (for example) a totally machined 1911 for $2500, or you can buy a mass-produced cast 1911 with the same features and add-ons for $600 (basic model for $450). Both are totally reliable.
My experience has been far different. Castings are inferior in every way and MIM cast parts are the bottom of the barrel in reliability. Castings are hard all the way through while double heat treated forgings are hard on the outside and soft on the inside to survive tremendous shock and or impact. I worked with castings for many years and generally they have to be made thicker and harder to even remotely be equal to a thinner and therefore lighter heat treated forging. Not to mention the hideous looking air holes in castings often called porosity.

In ancient times they had castings galore but they never made swords out of them because they shattered when subjected to sudden impact and this had not changed in 10,000 years even with the hocas pocas of modern advertisements. As a young man I once asked an older man selling Luger pistols about the difference between the recreation guns made in the 70's to the older Military made guns and his reply was, never drop one made of a casting because you will find out very quickly that the cheap cast frame will shatter when it hits a concrete floor. Later in life I saw engine bell housings indeed shatter when they only lightly bumped a concrete floor when they fell just a few inches off of a wooden skid as opposed to seeing forged crank shafts dropped from a height of 4 ft and actually bounce on a concreate floor with only minor scuffing. That is the difference between a junk casting and a quality forging.

The porosity (polite word for hideous air holes) is usually very evident in most guns that have been made of castings. Yes there have been a few like the Browning High Powers that had very good polishing jobs in an attempt to hide the porosity at least on the outside of the gun.

Castings because of their porosity when made in carbon steel will rust while you are standing their just looking at them. I am not being factious in any way as I have actually witnessed this on a humid day while working with castings in the factories I once worked in. We often had to immediately spray them with WD40 when removing cosmoline from them and after wiping down the wd40 replace that with either a rust resistant oil or grease. I might add in the early 1900's before stainless steel was used in rifles the South American contract German made Mauser rifles were given a special heat treatment to slow down rusting in the the humid countries of South America. Yes they often eventually rusted below the stock line because the wood held in moisture against the metal receiver but on the outside this German Heat treatment really did resist serious rusting and often for years

To say I hate the sight of castings would be a vast understatement. If I were King I would blow all of them up with an atomic bomb and then laugh from now to eternity. The casting is nothing more than a cheap rip off to the consumer. Using forgings would not raise the price beyond affordability rather it would just cut down on the obscene profits companies make when they use the cheap brittle casting instead of a quality forging.

In conclusion I make the honest statement through bitter experience that castings are total junk and a total rip off and forgings are quality and something that you can be proud to own and will probably last you a lifetime if given even a minimal amount of reasonable care.

I might add I have refused to ever buy any Browning High Power made of a casting and have only bought the older high quality forged guns. The newer cheap cast High Powers were indeed made with thicker frames because they used a cheap casting on the frame which made the circumference greater and destroyed the grip ergonomics
 

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I purchased my first Walther last year. It is a Ft. Smith PPK/S First Edition .380 in stainless steel. I love it! I got the First Edition because I stumbled across it at a gun show. I got stainless steel because I often carry in the field around or in saltwater. I wanted a PPK because it is a hammer fired, double action - single action with a very reliable safety and de-cocking mechanism.

I also have a Colt Mustang XSP .380 and a Sig P938 9 mm. I have frequently carried both of these. They are about the same size as, or smaller than, the PPK/S, but they are both single action only which means I carry them cocked-and-locked. I know they are both designed to be carried safely with the hammer cocked, but that always made me a little nervous. The PPK/S seemed the perfect solution.

I also like the fixed barrel on the PPK/S. I often go "marsh mucking" in the local swamps where (in Florida) there is a remote possibility that a rather large creature could pull you under water and try to eat you! About the only way to deal with such a situation is to press the barrel directly against the attacker and fire. If you tried that with any semi auto without a fixed barrel, you would be very disappointed. About the only thing that could make this pistol any better would be the same size PPK/S in 9 mm. We can only dream.

Unfortunately, my PPK experience has not been flawless. I had a problem with the hammer strut (also known as the safety strut) occasionally engaging to block the hammer from falling - not a good thing for a defensive weapon. Please understand that this only occurred under very specific circumstances, and Walther did solve the problem.

I typically shoot 200+ rounds per range session, and this problem usually occurred only after the first 100 rounds. The first time I sent it to Walther for repair, they replaced the hammer strut spring, fired two magazines of ammo (about 12 rounds), and called it good. Unfortunately, that did not solve the problem. I returned it to them again with a lengthy letter explaining the it still malfunctioned 17 times in 200 rounds. They again tested with two magazines and returned it to me with a notation that they found no problem. Please understand that I am not complaining about Walther service. They were actually very helpful, but they could not recreate the problem because they did not put enough rounds through it.

I called them about the problem, and they suggested that after 100+ rounds, it might just be "shooter fatigue" causing me to loosen my grip. I rejected this suggestion out right because I often fire 200+ rounds of .357 mag. or .40 S&W with no loss of precision, and I often fire 200+ rounds of .380 in my Colt Mustang XSP (which is much smaller and lighter than the PPK/S) with no problems or loss of precision. I again fired 200+ rounds with 23 failures after the first 100 rounds. I returned it for the third time. By this time, the end of the hammer strut was beginning to deform because of the soft stainless steel. They replaced the strut and everything seems to be fine.

Again, please understand that I am not complaining about Walther's service or the Ft. Smith PPK/S. They simply could not recreate the problem, and it is probably unreasonable to expect them to fire 100+ rounds trying. I suspect that the tolerance on the hammer strut was just a little too close, and once the pistol heated up, its movement became restricted enough to cause the malfunction. It is now fixed and I love this pistol.
Now you know why I have only bought French and German made guns. I too often shoot 200 rounds through them and I never had any problems with these quality made guns and they never have failed to feed even flying ash tray hollow points. Never a problem of any kind but this is what is the result of a quality made gun. I have owned the European made guns since I bought my first one back in 1976. I have never owned an American made PPk or PPks and I never will own one.
 

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I think more and more people are buying the very small made 9mm guns these days especially those made of plastic. Sometimes the very small 9mm guns are lighter in weight even though somewhat larger than the Walther PP series of guns and the plastic guns do not rust in the frame either. When comparing the plastic .380 guns rather than the 9mm plastic guns they are of course even way lighter than the all steel PP Walther guns.

The price is also a factor as people buy what is the cheapest in price, not what is often the best and plastic is cheap and steel is not.

More modern designed guns usually have straighter in line feeding of the cartridges rather than the steeper feed ramp of the older Walther pp guns that were originally only designed to feed fmj rounds not hollow points. Yes its true the quality made European Walther's usually are very reliable with expanding ammo but not so much with the American made guns.

Double action Ignition with the my European made guns is flawless but has been a problem with the bottom of the barrel Smith made guns.

I have a plethora of classic European all steel .32 and .380 auto's none of which I carry anymore. Why should I when I can cut loose with the way more powerful and very small 9mm guns that are almost as concealable and light in weight if not more light in weight than the classic .32 and .380 guns.
 

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New here. Just bought a stainless Fort Smith PPK. I've been collecting various pistols and revolvers for 30+ years, and I must say the quality and craftsmanship of the new PPK is excellent. I was so impressed I bought a second one for my son. I've had several Walters in the past, including an excellent 1943 P38 with matching everything including original black leather holster that I sold about 25 years ago for $400 (facepalm).

Back to the original posters question about the PPK market. Judging by this auction that just closed on Gunbroker, the market is booming. This S&W PPK, stainless, .32ACP, used, no box, just sold for $1,000. Why in the world anyone would pay this is beyond me, I would have thought more like $500, especially with the new Fort Smith PPKs going for $800. The seller apparently agreed since he set the no-reserve auction starting price at $400. The only thing I can think of is that it is in .32 and Walther is currently only making .380s? If so, then they need to start making .32s !

Walther PPK Smith & Wesson 32 ACP - Semi Auto Pistols at GunBroker.com : 875385999

Love these little classics. Yes, the plastic guns are better in every way except for the lack of any history or beauty. That you can occasionally fire a few rounds through them if the mood strikes is just a bonus.
 

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Whatever your opinion of cast/MIM parts, they are here to stay. Used properly, of the correct alloy, no reason to fear them. Oddly, the cast frame HiPower came to be when the forged frame couldn't handle conversion to .40 S&W.
Prefer the older, forged internal parts on S&Ws (and they are nicer to work on...but more often need smoothing).
As regards durability, I'm not convinced older guns were designed for the huge round counts that modern arms endure. Glocks aren't especially loveable except for how they run. And run they do.
As regards the future of the PPK, a lot depends on the buyers' perspective. Knowledgeable shooters who want an effective tool will likely pick, say, a SIG P365, over a PPK. Someone charmed by an older design may pursue the Ft. Smith pistols.
Gun owners tend to be a conservative lot, so a continuing market for the PPK series isn't impossible.
Let us show kindness to the legions of new shooters who have joined our ranks recently.
Moon
 
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Pistols in 9 mm Police/Ultra are pretty much at the blowback design limits. Walther experimented with 9 Para in a PP back in the 1930s. A less punishing recoil design is obviously preferred unless one magazine is all that you want to shoot or you enjoy self punishment. The PP-series was designed around .32 for a reason, although they are sublime in .22.
 

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Amen. There is a downside to the simplicity of the blowback design, and that is the beating your hand endures as the slide comes to a screeching halt. The designers even included a little flex in the triggerguard where its boss stops the slide travel, but the problem remains.
The much lighter, but locked breech G42 is a honey in .380.
If you want a blowback 9mm, have a look at a HiPoint...said no one, ever. ;)
Moon
 
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