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MGMike: You are very correct in what you say. Sam Cummings did own "MANY" buildings that also might very well of had the same letters on them. I posted a photo from the Interarmco catalog showing three bulidings that have "Interamco" on them, I would say that would be MUCH more rare. Since Intermco started in 1953 and only went to 1967 from my research. I did not say I have the only set of letters. I also do not know how many sets were sent directly to Walther collectors that asked for them from Interarms (on 10 Prince street) and how many were just destroyed.
 

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Bought from them an Interarms Mauser Mk X carbine (wood all the way to the muzzle) in .30-06 with double-set triggers and butter knife bolt handle back in the 70s. I still hunt with it and still love it. I was really sad to hear of their demise. They used to advertise in all the gun mags along with "Ye Olde Hunter". Were they they same company? One or both of them listed a 20 mm anti-tank rifle from Finland with the comment that you could rabbit hunt and a near miss would do. :) I think that Interarms used to brag that they could outfit an entire light infantry battalion on short notice.
 

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When I lived and worked in Alexandria in the early 60's the Interarms Co. was a complex of several buildings down on Prince St. I worked on Duke St and used to walk past the place to grab lunch on the Potomac. The largest building has Interarms painted on the side of the building (or perhaps the roof). There were small freighters that used to dock there. My military duties took me away in 1965 and I've not been back since 1970. Those were the days.
DennisG
 

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In 1972, while stationed in Maryland and remembering the unique address from ads in The American Rifleman, I visited 0 Prince Street in Alexandria. Unfortunately it was on a Sunday and nothing was open.

I spent most of my off duty time exploring the interesting places in and around Washington DC. Among my favorites was that part of Alexandria.

The cobblestone streets were an effective way to keep traffic speeds low. Seems there were a lot more of them at that time.

The Interarms building closest to the river is now occupied by Potomac Party Cruises.
 

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When I was there last --a few months ago--the two largest Interarms warehouses, at the corner of Duke and S. Union Streets were being torn down, along with the big Robinson Terminal complex, where ocean freighters once docked. This means that Alexandria will no longer be a port. It is all to be replaced by a yuppie waterfront conglomeration of restaurants, hotels, high-end retail, and condos for refugees from Manhattan. Hunter's Haven, the little 2d story gunshop on the water, was rotting and derelict; it's probably gone by now.

M
 

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The old Interarms site is just a couple of blocks downriver from the old Navy torpedo factory. If memory serves, this was the establishment that produced so many dud torpedoes during WW2.
 

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Last time I was there the Torpedo Factory was a hive of shops and restaurants. That's been a very long time ago though.
Re the cobblestone streets - my recollection is that those streets were paved with ballast brick, rather than cobblestone. I know with certainty that across the river in Georgetown many ballast brick streets remained well into the 2000s.
 
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