Walther Forums banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I found an Interarms PPK Stainless today. The shop owner wouldn't let me field strip it nor was he eager to do so. With the slide locked back, could see that it was dirty from firing and hadn't been cleaned in some time.

Outwardly it looked good---finish, grips, magazine---in good shape. $450.

Not being able to look inside, I left it. A deal or not.

Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
923 Posts
It's in the ballpark. I paid $419 for an Interarms stainless PPK/S, and $399 for a blued Interams PPK, both in excellent shape and felt the prices were fair. Possibly you could do better at Gunbroker.com but by the time that you paid shipping and transer fees you probably wouldn't be in as good a shape as you are with the gun that you walked away from.

As to not being able to strip it down, I think you should be able to get a good sense of its condition with the slide wracked and a good bore light. I never go into a shop without a bore light in my pocket. I've been buying used guns for decades and have never stripped one down in the shop.

Q
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,914 Posts
I'm with Dave. Field stripping is such a simple thing that I get suspicious when a seller won't allow it. Systematic manipulation of all the controls will tell a lot about a gun's mechanical condition, but many other things are revealed in a Walther PP-series pistol that can't be seen unless the slide is removed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
529 Posts
I'm with Dave. Field stripping is such a simple thing that I get suspicious when a seller won't allow it. Systematic manipulation of all the controls will tell a lot about a gun's mechanical condition, but many other things are revealed in a Walther PP-series pistol that can't be seen unless the slide is removed.

Same here. If the seller won't let me examine the gun, it's no sale.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
7,055 Posts
I agree with Que. And there's a reason why gun store owners don't like to have customers taking apart handguns. The "oops factor". The gun owner has NO idea how competent the customer is at disassembling the gun. Imagine the slide on a PPK getting launched and hitting the glass display case, or even worse, another customer. :eek:
I MAY ask the store owner to strip it for me, but even that is iffy. Some gun shop staff are just salesman. They know all the info on what the gun is and what it shoots, but they may not know squat about how it comes apart and is put back together.
How clean the gun is may be a better indicator of how well it was taken care of by a previous owner. I would be more reluctant to buy a gun that was coated with funk on the inside, than one that the shop owner wouldn't let me take apart.

Dep



100% free webcam site! | Awesome chicks and it is absolutely free! | Watch free live sex cam - easy as 1-2-3
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,914 Posts
... there's a reason why gun store owners don't like to have customers taking apart handguns. The "oops factor". The gun owner has NO idea how competent the customer is at disassembling the gun. Imagine the slide on a PPK getting launched and hitting the glass display case or even worse, another customer...
That is quite true. Some stores have a policy that if a gun is to be field-stripped, the salesman does it. I can't quarrel with that. But if the salesman doesn't know how, then he should summon another who does. There is no excuse for not having anyone in the store who can field strip a pistol for examination.

I've had two experiences within the past month in two separate stores, both large and well-inventoried. In one I asked if I could field strip a SIG pistol I was looking at. The clerk said politely, "I'll do it. We'd rather not have the customers doing it." I understood, handed it back to him, and he took it apart for me. I saw things inside that I didn't like, and I gave it back to him and thanked him. He had some minor difficulty getting it back together. Sometimes the hardest thing in the world is to watch someone struggle with a task you know perfectly well how to do-- and refrain from saying anything. He managed it eventually and I thanked him again. I felt a little bad about it.

In the other store, I asked to field strip a surplus P.38. The clerk asked, "Do you know how to do it?" I nodded, and he said, "Go ahead, I've never tried it." Inside, the barrel was missing the plunger that actuates the locking block. It is normally staked in, but there was just a hole where it belonged. It hand-cycled okay as long as the gun was right-side up; inverted it would not unlock. I pointed this out to the clerk; he showed the manager and they tagged the gun for repair.

Moral: Field stripping before purchase can be useful. For me, it's obligatory.

M
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Yes but---the store owner would not remove the slide. Believe me, it was a bit dirty when looking down the grip and in looking in the chamber. The owner said he had no history and did not remember who owned it before him. I think I will pass. However-------

There was this LNIB Browning Hi Power MKIII. It is clean and it smiled at me. Oh shucks-----------I smiled back. Same asking price as the PPK. (Lists new for $813.)

Maybe I'll go back tomorrow.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
361 Posts
If a store won't let me, or if they wont field strip a used gun for me, I will look somewhere else. To me that's an obvious sign there is something they don't want you to see or find out. I would not ask them to field strip a brand new gun unless it is a gun that I am unfamiliar with and I am seeking instruction on how to proceed. In that case, I would ask.

I guess I am a bad customer on a couple of fronts. But the last two stops I made while looking for a PPK, I found two used interarms both abused, one more than the other. I didn't ask to field strip ... I just went ahead and popped the slide off. Neither salesman said anything. I must say I didn't realize there was an etiquette to field stripping a gun. I know now that I should ask before hand, but maybe its just where I'm from the local stores expect you to fully inspect a gun or more than likely they were being polite inspite of my rudeness. Either way, I didn't purchase either gun due to price not being in sync with condition. Thanks for the advice and changing my rude behavior ... :eek:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
361 Posts
Field stripping a gun without asking is kinda like reaching up a girl's skirt to check out the merchandise. Some like it and some will slap the shit out of you. ;)
I must say ... that's the best line I have ever read on a message board!

From what I have learned through movies ... Mick Dundee taught me that's how you pick your women to go home with :D





Very appropriate and I have learned my lesson ... :cool:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,914 Posts
Actually, it's just an extension of gun show etiquette. One should ask permission before picking up a gun from a table. Many exhibitors have signs to that effect, but it's not a bad rule to observe universally --unless the display is of a nature suggesting that customers are expected to root around and handle anything they want to see. You can generally tell which ones those are; if in doubt, ask.

Corollaries to this rule: Don't dry-fire a gun you are examining. If in the course of examination, you cock the gun, and can't decock it by gently lowering the hammer, give it back and tell the man that it's still cocked. Let him decide what to do. Also, do not close the slide or the bolt on a semi-auto firearm by tripping the latch and letting it slam home. EASE it down-- no matter what you were taught in the Army.

Nowadays most gun shows require displayed guns to be nylon-tied. In many cases this precludes working the action unless the tie is cut off. Don't ask the exhibitor to do this unless you are genuinely interested in the gun.

M
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,784 Posts
MGMike is right!!!

It really boils down to common courtsey, be respectful of the firearms you handle, if you don't know the drill on a particular pistol - ask!!!

I part-time in a shop and am aways surprised by how many folks come in, ask to see a pistol, then once it is in hand have absolutely no idea how to deal with it. Sometimes - it can be quite interesting to watch!!!

Biggest boo-boo IS dropping the slide as Mike described or doing the Bogart "whip" to close a cylinder.

Given the average fellows who come in, it is no wonder we do not allow them to take new guns apart!!!

I don't feel it is necessary to field strip a new firearm either. Field stripping a new Glock or 1911 style pistol is not going to reveal much more than you can see with the slide locked back and the clip retracted.

Used guns are different, but frankly most of them aren't used much!!! We don't buy/consign firearms with "issues". Should a good customer require a breakdown I take it to our Smitthy for that. He has a nice bench with a rubber mat to set things on.

Stripping a pistol down on the glass counter, with lots of witnesses is an open invitation to "Murphy". The other day one of our clerks, a fan of the Kahr eagerly broke one down to show a customer the innards. Sure enough his expert demonstration turned silly when he accidently lauched the recoil spring across the sales floor. He has done the take down hundreds of times - but it only takes that one mistake to make you look a fool, customer or clerk!

And Dep,

That line about the skirt!!! :eek: :D :)
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
7,055 Posts
Well said MGMike and 153. Agree 100%. I ALWAYS practice the rule of easing the hammer down and decocking the bolt action by pulling the trigger while closing the bolt. I do it on my own guns and I definitely do it on other people's guns, including ones at gun shows or gun stores. I have been in gun stores where a guy is handed a revolver and he proceeds to rapidly squeeze the trigger WITHOUT verifying that it is empty!!!! Half the people in the store ducked for cover. The store owner said "gimme that!!!" and then heaved the guy out of the store. Scary shit.:(



100% free webcam site! | Awesome chicks and it is absolutely free! | Watch free live sex cam - easy as 1-2-3
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
923 Posts
I agree 100% with asking first and easing a slide or hammer closed. I handle firearms ina shop as I handle my own. When I'm in a shop that I'm not familiar with I always ask whether I can dry fire, and if it is a vintage/C&R gun I ask no matter what.

as to stripping down a gun, I guess I've never asked to do it on a shop (that I can recall) as I've never opened up a gun after a sale to find a nasty surprise. That's not to say that it won't happen, but I've been pretty good about getting a handle on a guns condition from a thorough look otherwise. I agree that there are some issues that can only be detected with the slide off, but I haven't run into them so far.

That said, I have bought guns from Gunbroker and Auction Arms but only with a right to inspection and return, and that certainly includes stripping the gun down. So, I suppose if it's that important to me with an Internet purchase it might be worth my while with a shop purchase. That's food for thought.

Q
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
7,055 Posts
Que: Again...I have the same experience as you. Never broke one down and never had a problem because of that. I also never bought from Gunbroker, although when I still had an FFL I did buy sight unseen from wholesalers. And I did get a couple of guns (a .44 S&W Special N-Frame and a Colt Python stainless) that had problems from the factory. Both were returned to the factory for repairs. Buying from Gunbroker is a completely different thing and I agree with you that buying with a right to inspect and return is essential.



100% free webcam site! | Awesome chicks and it is absolutely free! | Watch free live sex cam - easy as 1-2-3
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
mjp,

The MK III, 9mm, came home with me today. I will clean it this afternoon and get ready for some range time. I have a Standard on order so this one will ease my agnst until the new one comes in.

All-----

I do appreciate the discussion on manners and good practice when in a gun shop. The shop I talked about deals only in used arms. The owner asked me today if I was still interested in the PPK. I replied that by the way it looks from a brief inspection, it was not taken good care of and I was not interested unless I could be more thorough in looking it over. We completed the paperwork for the Hi Power and that was that.

Maybe later he will soften his position. If not, well, there are others.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top