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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I recently acquired a 1989 Interarms PPK in great condition. I've done some searching but can't quite find an answer to my question. I noticed while gripping the pistol with the pinky extension magazine inserted, that if I grip hard and press the magazine back in the magazine well (there is a slight amount of front to back play with the magazine inserted), it will cause the magazine to drop and a stovepipe to occur. If I don't grip the extension tightly, I have no problems.

I had a bit of a hard time describing this issue, so I hope it makes sense. I of course have no problems with the flush fit magazine. I see no unusual wear and both magazines lock tight when inserted. Again, I only have problems while shooting and gripping the pinky extension too tight.

Is this common? Thanks for any feedback.
 

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Probably there is only marginal engagement of the magazine catch, and you are able to exert enough leverage on the pinky rest to either take up all the play between the mag body and the mag well, or distort the mag body sufficiently to disengage it. It's not at all unusual to find considerable dimensional variation among magazine bodies, or even some that are out of square in cross-section --which may account for your situation if only one mag exhibits the problem.

Try an experiment --switch the pinky rest to the other mag and see what happens...

M

P.S. When all else fails, break this forum's long-standing tradition: read an FAQ. https://www.waltherforums.com/forum...ropsies-troubleshooting-magazine-fallout.html
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you for the reply. I can't really tell how much engagement is enough, so I've attached a couple of photos. It doesn't seem like very much engagement, but at the same it looks like much more engagement would interfere with the follower or cartridges in the magazine.
 

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I don't have a PPK. But I do have some pictures of the amount of magazine catch engagement....very much like your pictures. My pictures were of a PPQ.....or maybe it was a P99....can't remember.....I'll try to find em'.

But, looking at your pictures, I'd say that amount of engagement looks good to me. Now, are you able to apply pressure in various manners...forward, backward, twist...etc. and get the magazine to disengage? If not, I'd think you're OK.

Follow Mike's advice.....including reading the FAQ's.....lots of good information in there.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I don't have a PPK. But I do have some pictures of the amount of magazine catch engagement....very much like your pictures. My pictures were of a PPQ.....or maybe it was a P99....can't remember.....I'll try to find em'.

But, looking at your pictures, I'd say that amount of engagement looks good to me. Now, are you able to apply pressure in various manners...forward, backward, twist...etc. and get the magazine to disengage? If not, I'd think you're OK.

Follow Mike's advice.....including reading the FAQ's.....lots of good information in there.
I can push, pull, twist, etc. the magazine when its inserted and not get it to come out. It will only come out is when firing with the pinky extension having pressure applied back on it so that the back of the magazine is up against the back of the magazine well.
 

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Near as I can tell from your photos, the mag catch does not seem worn. If its "shelf" is square, it's probably okay. The concave curve in its outer edge is to provide clearance for the cartridges rising past it.

If the catch is good, the problem is more difficult to diagnose. But if you are patient, you'll find the problem by the process of elimination.

First thing: Examine the pie-shaped engagement hole in the bodies of your two magazines. Make sure the upper edge is straight, square and not rounded or deformed.

Then determine is whether you can dislodge an empty magazine by applying pressure to the pinky rest, using the same grip you would use while actually shooting. Make sure the mag catch spring is correctly installed, with the wide end coil in the catch.

If you cannot, under any circumstances and with any grip, replicate this malfunction with the magazine empty, then I suspect that the catch is protruding into the mag interior. If so, a bullet nose, or maybe the follower, may be kissing the catch when it's directly opposite, and the impetus of recoil has a cue-ball effect, knocking it out of engagement. Try to determine if the drop-out occurs at a regular point in the number of rounds fired (for example, with only two (?) rounds left in the mag). If so, figure out what is opposite the catch when it happens, bearing in mind that the cartridge column is moving when the slide cycles. If you're using handloads, see if it persists with factory ammo having a different OAL.

I would NOT go willy-nilly altering the mag catch to "see if it helps" unless it's obviously in contact with bullet noses (look for copper smear on the catch); these "experiments" often wind up ruining the catch, and then you'll need a new one -- which is expensive.

Your problem might emanate from a slight mislocation of the hole in the frame for the mag catch; then it's a problem for a gunsmith who understands the geometry.

Or it may be that your magazine bodies are distorted. Some of the early magazines were not hardened as well as the later ones. Try a new Mec-Gar magazine with a pinky rest before any alteration to the gun.

M
 
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