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Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone,

I just inherited my grandfather’s Walter PP. I want to understand the gun and have been doing some research. My father says his dad brought it home from WWll and the s/n seems to support the manufacturing date. The slide might have been replaced as it does not match the number on the frame. However the numbers are not that far off and both end in the letter “P”. There are no markings on the left side of the slide. The pistol is in great shape and I want to take great care of it. Any input is appreciated.

Thank you
95929
95930
95931
 

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Welcome aboard. One of the Walther experts on WWII and Pre-war pistols will be along shortly. ;)
 

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I'm no expert, but looking at the serial number, late (no logo) slide and lack of inspection marks, I'm wondering if this was a cigarette gun, ie one made on demand for the occupying soldiers after the Walther plant was captured by GIs in March of 1945. Have it inspected to ensure it is safe to fire as those assembled for the capturing soldiers were not all proofed.
 

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Looks like a late war pistol, apparently not proofed. I think the advice to have it inspected is sage advice, but I don't know who is qualified to inspect such a pistol. Possibly Earl? I'd either shoot it taking a chance or put it in my sock drawer.

Typically, cigarette guns are Mauser rifles. I've never heard of a cigarette pistol. After the capture of the Walther factory by GIs, guns on the assembly line were in various stages of completion (I've heard) and were put together in pieces by our GIs. Hence mixed up and sometimes non serial number matches.

Another possibility is it was repaired in the field by the Germans. Either way, a good trophy of that terrible war.
 

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It is a .32 caliber Walther PP likely produced at the end of the war at the Zella-Mehlis plant. These pistols were produced in the shorter PPK and the longer barrel PP model. Calibers were .22, .32 ACP and .380 ACP ( 9mm Kurz). There was no time left for final polishing and fine blueing. No one will ever know the story of it any better than your grandfather. With non matching serial numbers it could have been a parts (gun put together soon after the capture by US GI's with some pistols being assembled by factory workers from parts for a pack of cigarettes, etc. Hence cigarette guns. Who knows. Apparently the pistol was never proofed to make sure the chamber/barrel could safely contain burn pressure of a fired cartridge.. If so it would be stamped with an eagle/N. Check the end of the muzzle of the barrel, right side to see if it is perhaps stamped there. As you can imagine, if this pistol/parts was still at the plant when the Americans walked in.....there would be a lot of confusion. The pistol was originally designed for the .32 cartridge and not the .380. I'd never sell it. If you Google photos of Spreewerks P38 pistols you will see some late pistols with the same type of rough machined finish. 1917
 

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That looks similar to a late war .32 PP I had. Loved the "blankness" of it.

No Walther banner on the left side of the slide. Mine only had ac on the right side of the slide, same spot. No eagle/n anywhere, and serial number on the frame not unlike the OP in that the three last numbers were lightly marked in contrast to the first three.

Noticeably, like the OP, it had the same deep scratch on the left side of the frame at the top of the tang caused by the unfinished slide. It could have been resolved by sanding, grinding off that part of the slide but I liked it the way it was. I had it reblued (more like deep black) and it looked gorgeous.

It fired just fine, nice accuracy. I think I gifted it to someone.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thank you all for your input. There was no stamp at end of the barrel. However, Nice pistol with a great story. My grandfather was an officer in the war who smoked so I have no doubt a true cigarette gun. After sharing these post with my father he assured me my uncle had a gun smith check this out and it is fire ready. I looking forward to sharing its history with others.
 

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At least the frame was grinded and (re-)blued. A gun made of parts found at the factory. Several missmatched, not proofed PP are known.
 

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Very nice !!!
On my phone the 'ac' looks double struck. Is this the case? Just curious.....
Enjoy firing it ! (just nothing too hot )

Inherited my pp 35 yrs ago...(pop turned his collection over to me 15 yrs before he passed. He always told me the local burgermeister turned the firearms he collected over to him as he rolled thru an Austrian town, Tyrol region, early '45
 
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