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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got a 2004 AS P99, sometimes I like to leave one in the chamber when in the house. But I get scared of the decocker, after racking the slide.

Is there a possibility that the decocker might fail and shoot the round? I know I sound paranoid but that's why even when I conceal carry I carry with the chamber empty.

Any ideas?
 

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No, not paranoid at all. Anything can go wrong, in this case suppose the firing pin block is broken or maybe never installed at the factory. Theoretically decocking without the firing pin block could fire the round. I don't know if I am correct, but never take a chance. When I decock in the house I always point in the direction that the only possible harm could be a hole in my roof and nothing else!!!.
 

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The first time I used the decocker I was scared as hell worried it would fire I have a p99c qa since it will not fire when it is decocked I do not carry it in that state once I get back home I do decock it but carefully it still worries me a bit you could always eject all the rounds and decock it empty if you are worried at all.
 

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Walther has been making guns with decockers since what, the PP in 1929?

It's safe. As safe as carrying a gun. As safe as YOU make it.
Faulty equipment? Sure. But that's why you never point the gun at something you are not willing to destroy.

The striker's not going to hit the primer unless the trigger bar is moved rearward.

So, as long as your booger hook doesn't press the boom switch, you're good to go.

I know that I will run the risk of starting a war by saying this, but...

Condition 3 carry, or Israeli Carry, or whatever you want to call it, is dangerous - to you. I know, that's what the US Army taught for years with 1911s. But hell, we also used to carry revolvers on an empy chamber too. BTW, as far as I know, the current accepted method for the military and the M9 is chamber loaded and decocked.

I think you are really cutting your chances of survivablity by carrying your handgun in condition 3.

So much can happen to you. Just think about this scenario:
You're in Condition Yellow (aware of your surroundings)
But, you miss something (or more likely, ignore one of your gut feelings - I say that because I've done it before).
So all of a sudden, your at bad breath distance with a bad guy.
Now, you've got to fend off a dude with your weak hand while...
drawing your pistol from concealment - which may take two hands if you're running IWB with a covering garment.
And now, you have to take that free hand off your opponent and rack the slide?

Another one. Ever heard of the Tueler drill?
Basically, Tueler figured out:
That a man (with a knife - club - or cream pie) can close on someone in approximately the same amount of time that it takes for someone to draw and fire a weapon. The magic distance is 7 yards.

I've seen it with my own eyes at a threat management class.

One instructor closed on the chief insturctor (a police officer) from 21 feet away. The chief instructor had just cleared leather with his Glock 19 when the "bad guy" "stabbed" him in the neck.

Please, do yourself a favor and get comfortable with that pistol. Decock it in a safe direction (it should ALWAYS be pointed in a safe direction anyway). Holster it and live a good long time.
 

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[b said:
Quote[/b] (autospike @ May 08 2005,9:56)]BTW, as far as I know, the current accepted method for the military and the M9 is chamber loaded and decocked.

Please, do yourself a favor and get comfortable with that pistol.  Decock it in a safe direction (it should ALWAYS be pointed in a safe direction anyway).  Holster it and live a good long time.
Autospike is correct...at least in the Navy, we are now having Sailors carry in Condition I. That's led to a fair number of negligent discharges...but always because someone had a finger on the trigger when it didn't belong there (and it's on the Beretta M9...not a Walther).

I'm always a little nervous about decocking, too -- but I just make sure I do it in a safe direction. You could build yourself a simple clearing barrel -- a five gallon bucket filled with gravel and sand...with an opening at the top where you can place the muzzle when you unload or decock. As soon as I finish the move into our new house, I plan on building one to keep next to my gun safe. That way I can decock with confidence. (BTW, the plans come from the Marine Corps range manual -- so I'm not just "winging" it!)

Jim
 

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Carrying a handgun will not protect you from all conceivable threats. Everyone must make their own judgments on what -their- compromises are. Not feeling comfortable because you feel your handgun is not safe (round in chamber) can make you a more likely target or over-react to certain situations. I don't carry but I would probably carry an AS in DA mode. If you carry with an empty chamber you need to practice racking the slide with one hand to counter the situation you mention. Or you estimate that you won't be caught by bad guys in alleys because that's not where you go.

I saw a comparable test to the Tueler drill. The demontration on shows how quick someone can move and how long it can take to shoot a threat. It doesn't mean that someone will all of a sudden, with no warning, start sprinting at you from 21 feet. Most likely you will detect the threat way before then, causing you to draw before he starts to run.

I totally agree with your last sentence. Decock with the gun in a safe direction (not always up) as it should always be pointed that way anyway. Practice decocking the gun at the range so you become confident that it will work properly.

Anyway, I guess my points are that there's no absolute preparedness when you carry. It depends on proficiency, technique, equipment and other factors. They are not the same for everyonce.

And no matter what you carry and how you carry it, practice it the way you carry it
 

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I have to agree with the words said. Mind your 4 laws of Gun Safety, and you should have nothing to worry about. I've carried my QA for years now with out a mishap. Why? Because I follow the rules of gun safety.
 

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[b said:
Quote[/b] (Nocturnal @ May 08 2005,10:46)]Carrying a handgun will not protect you from all conceivable threats.
Yeah, very well said.

Whatever you do, don't let the handgun (knife, pepperspray, etc.) become a talisman.

You know... Something that *just having* makes you invincible.

My mention of the Tueler was to just point out how quickly this stuff can happen.

I think I have read that most defensive shootings take place within 10 feet and are over in 3 seconds. That ain't long.
 

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I thought condition 1 is round chambered and hammer cocked in single action. I am not sure the navy would carry fire arms in that condition. Perhaps you meant condition 2, round chambered, hammer down in double action mode.
 

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[b said:
Quote[/b] (banddr2 @ May 08 2005,11:18)]I thought condition 1 is round chambered and hammer cocked in single action.  I am not sure the navy would carry fire arms in that condition.     Perhaps you meant condition 2, round chambered, hammer down in double action mode.  
I think that's condition "0": chambered, cocked, unlocked

Condition "1": chambered, cocked, locked

Condition "2": chambered, uncocked, locked; or on a DA/SA pistol: chambered, DA-mode, no safety

Here's a link which discusses the conditions related to the 1911: 1911 Conditions of Readiness
 

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Condition 3 is AFAIK:

Loaded mag, nothing in chamber.

So, to get the gun going, you gotta rack the slide.

Every once in a while, I here it referred to as Israeli style.
US Military also advocated the same for a number of years.

My dad (USAF Korean war vet) still carries his 1911 that way as opposed to cocked and locked.
 
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