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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I'm an idiot. :mad:

I was at my LGS looking at guns last week and they had a 7.65mm Walther PP Made in W. Germany in good, very holster worn, yet fully operable condition for $499. I had it in my hands and I passed on it! 3 days later I went back to buy it and it was gone. :(

I really want one now and I've looked everywhere. Gunbroker, Earl's, Cabela's online gun library, and armslist. Cheapest ones I found were on Cabela's for ~$650. Most expensive I've seen was about $1300.

I originally wanted a blued PPK but I cannot find one anywhere. Any PPK without a beaver tail is preferred, but a S&W or a brand new Fort Smith would be considered. (hurry up, Arkansas!) Then I saw this PP and now I am open to either a PP or PPK. I'm leaning towards a PP because I think they are more unique, and being an enormous Bond enthusiast, it'd be awesome to have (technically) Bond's first gun.

I guess the point of this post is to rant about my loss and to ask you guys how to find a nice, reasonably priced PP or PPK. Also, please tell me $500 is a horrible price for a PP to make me feel better. ;)
 

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Well,if it makes you feel better,I'll.
About a mo.ago,I got a INTREARMS stainless one,and I paid $700 for it.It's kind of looking like new,2 magazine,nothing else....

Luckily I think money is fiat,so to me it makes no difference.
Life is good.
You have to make yourself happy,because most likely nobody else will.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I'd pay $700. I just wish I could find one at a LGS because I'm not a huge fan of blowing that much money on a sight unseen used gun.
 

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I passed on it! 3 days later I went back to buy it and it was gone. :(
We've all been there. Don't worry though, there are still plenty of PP and PPK's just waiting for you. Interarms and S&W never made the PP, just the PPK and PPK/S. If you want a Zella-Mehlis, Ulm, or Manurhin pistol try Simpson's. I've bought a lot of guns from them over the years and have never been disappointed. Just be patient and you'll find one that's perfect.

https://www.simpsonltd.com/collections/walther-hand-guns
 

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In 7.65/.32, you can find nice Manurhin or Walther PP in the $500 range, no problem. I bought a really nice Manurhin PP in 7.65 for $450 a few months ago. PPK/S in 7.65 are a bit harder, and PPK will cost even more. You will pay around 15-20% less for Manurhin, which are fine pistols.

I agree with Redcat, Simpson’s is a no brainer if you worry about buying through an auction site. Their first listing here has a nice Manurhin in 7.65 for right at $500.

https://www.simpsonltd.com/search?q=PP
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I'm only 3 hours from them! Maybe I'll take a look into it. There are a few tempting ones on there.

The new question I have is- is there anything I should know about shooting a nearly 80 year old Walther? Does modern ammo work ok in them? If I got one like the 1940 I saw on Simpson would it be better to just keep it as a safe queen or shoot it like I use my other guns.
 
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My oldest is a .32 Manurhin from the early 1950’s, and I do not hesitate to shoot it early and often. In my .22 PPs, I routinely shoot HV, but I shy away from more extreme loads like stingers. In the case of .32 ammo, the pistols were designed for European loads, which tend to be hotter than American ammo. So, people often advocate shooting something like Prvi Partizan, S&B, or Fiocchi. (I usually buy those brands anyway because they tend to be a bit less expensive.) For my .380 PP-series pistols, they are so snappy that I don’t enjoy a hot load. If I want to shoot .380 for long, then I use my PP Super, which has more mass and a larger grip, so it is less tiring and more peasant (ditto for shooting 9x18 Ultra, which is midway between .380 and 9mm).

If I owned a pre-war PP or PPK, I imagine that I would shoot it, but probably sparingly. True wartime military pistols have a wide range of history and (ab)use, and the late-war pistols were being cranked out at a breakneck pace. Obviously, some are in great condition. You can certainly find parts and competent gunsmiths, if needed, but why bother with those for shooting purposes when you can get abundant post-war pistols, often at a lower price point? As I stated elsewhere, Manurhin is a fine pistol, and the finish and bluing on the early pistols is sublime. My $0.02, and YMMV. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
My oldest is a .32 Manurhin from the early 1950’s, and I do not hesitate to shoot it early and often. In my .22 PPs, I routinely shoot HV, but I shy away from more extreme loads like stingers. In the case of .32 ammo, the pistols were designed for European loads, which tend to be hotter than American ammo. So, people often advocate shooting something like Prvi Partizan, S&B, or Fiocchi. (I usually buy those brands anyway because they tend to be a bit less expensive.) For my .380 PP-series pistols, they are so snappy that I don’t enjoy a hot load. If I want to shoot .380 for long, then I use my PP Super, which has more mass and a larger grip, so it is less tiring and more peasant (ditto for shooting 9x18 Ultra, which is midway between .380 and 9mm).

If I owned a pre-war PP or PPK, I imagine that I would shoot it, but probably sparingly. True wartime military pistols have a wide range of history and (ab)use, and the late-war pistols were being cranked out at a breakneck pace. Obviously, some are in great condition. You can certainly find parts and competent gunsmiths, if needed, but why bother with those for shooting purposes when you can get abundant post-war pistols, often at a lower price point? As I stated elsewhere, Manurhin is a fine pistol, and the finish and bluing on the early pistols is sublime. My $0.02, and YMMV. ;)

Thanks for the advice! Good to know that it shouldn't be an issue. Now the only thing left is to wait for a PP or PPK to cross my path. :D
 

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Run-of-the-mine ex-German police Walther PP .32s are common, and can be found (if you are not in a rush to empty your pockets) in the $400-$600 range. Tens of thousands were imported in the 1980s.

You can pay more for exquisite original condition or less for been-there-done-that, but they are not hard to find.

M
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I'm not in a huge rush. A PP 32acp would be nice. Just a matter of waiting. I'll post a picture when I do eventually get one. If the local gun shop gets the Fort Smiths anytime soon I'll probably end up buying one of those first.
 

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Do your homework, here and elsewhere. All of us have had the itch that we want to scratch right freakin' now. Try to be patient.

If you have never fired either, the .380 is snappy, tho' ammo is easier to find.
I wouldn't be in a hurry to snap up early Ft. Smith production, assuming it happens.
Welcome,
Moon
 

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My PP is from 1937 and I shoot it with either S&B or GECO current production ammo, I have no worries at all about the ammo being too hot for the pistol.
Get a nice Manurhin PP and be (very) happy. I'm still keeping my eyes open for one, can't have too many .32s you know.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Do your homework, here and elsewhere. All of us have had the itch that we want to scratch right freakin' now. Try to be patient.

If you have never fired either, the .380 is snappy, tho' ammo is easier to find.
I wouldn't be in a hurry to snap up early Ft. Smith production, assuming it happens.
Welcome,
Moon

I've fired my Dad's S&W .380 before without any complaints. Also, my Ruger 9x19 is about the size of the PPK and it's really snappy. I kinda like snappy little guns. :D

I've never fired a .32acp but I imagine its got little recoil.

As for early Ft. Smith, is it really that bad to buy an early production of a gun that's been around since 1929? What is there possibly to screw up?

Blitzpig, I will keep that in mind. Like I said, we will see what I cross paths with first. :)
 

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I've never fired a .32acp but I imagine its got little recoil.

As for early Ft. Smith, is it really that bad to buy an early production of a gun that's been around since 1929? What is there possibly to screw up?
32 PP-series pistols are ***** cats, and noticeably less snappy than the .380s.

As for how could Umarex possibly screw up this venerable design? I would say that the chances are well north of 50/50. As stated a couple of times already in just this thread, get yourself a vintage Walther or Manurhin and “be (very) happy” :) Let somebody else deal with the inevitable recall(s) that will plague the first run(s) of Ft. Smith PPK(/S) pistols. My second semi-educated $0.02 ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #17
We will see. First, they have to come to the stores!
 

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Discussion Starter #19
They might be the finest PPKs ever made. You don't know yet until they're in stores.
 
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