Walther Forums banner

1 - 20 of 47 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
145 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
"I can resist anything but temptation"
...so true, I felt again, I promised myself it'd never happen again
So, the question now is "What is this?"
I mean, it looks a Walther HP but a few characteristic are unusual: first of all the markings on the left side of the frame (only the Walther banner and the marking "Mod. HP"), then the lack of WaA and serial number on the right side of the slide.
I thought it could be a Mauser wartime frame matched with a commercial slide made in 1942 or 1943. Then again I thought it could be an Austrian HP... :confused:
I'll be grateful to anyone that will help to find out what I grabbed.
Maybe I am only clutching at straws.
:(

https://ibb.co/8YmdX0c


foto su web

https://ibb.co/zRNsYr3


foto su web

https://ibb.co/HpyfkJY


foto su web

https://ibb.co/9gnDVgN


foto su web
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,914 Posts
Just a guess, but I'm guessing some European gunsmith cobbled up a 7.65mm barrel and an HP slide and popped them onto a military Walther frame to make a mystery gun. You'd have to take it apart and study the proof marks and individual characteristics of the parts to learn more about it. Judging from the front sight, it's a professional job.

M
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
145 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks a lot Mike! I had the same thought about the "collage" but I never was undecided... a Porsche 911 still remains a Porsche 911 even if you paint it pink and yellow ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
145 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,999 Posts
Is this 7.65 meaning 32acp, or 7.65 meaning 30 Luger/7.65PARA?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
145 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Is this 7.65 meaning 32acp, or 7.65 meaning 30 Luger/7.65PARA?
7,65mm Parabellum (or .30 Luger), it was one of the few serious calibers allowed in Italy in the Seventies before the arrival of the 9x18mm Police, 9x23mm Steyr, 9x21mm IMI and so on.
I agree with Mike, I fear the .32 ACP could not have enough energy to cycle correctly
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
145 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
7,65mm Parabellum (or .30 Luger), it was one of the few serious calibers allowed in Italy in the Seventies before the arrival of the 9x18mm Police, 9x23mm Steyr, 9x21mm IMI and so on.
I agree with Mike, I fear the .32 ACP could not have enough energy to cycle correctly
not true... the .22LR version works flawlessly with the correct spring :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,999 Posts
Being a homebuilt, the builder could have set it up for 32acp.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
145 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,999 Posts
Nice, I would add that to my collection if I came across it.


I have two P5 "twin barrels" (9mmPara & 7.65mmPara/30 Luger).
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,914 Posts
not true... the .22LR version works flawlessly with the correct spring :)
With a much-lightened slide, and a much different magazine.

Even then, functioning was not considered acceptable if more than 5 rounds were loaded in the magazine.

M
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,999 Posts
With a much-lightened slide, and a much different magazine.

Even then, functioning was not considered acceptable if more than 5 rounds were loaded in the magazine.

M

I TOTALLY forgot about the issues of putting 7.65acp in 7.65Para/9mm mags.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
145 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
With a much-lightened slide, and a much different magazine.

Even then, functioning was not considered acceptable if more than 5 rounds were loaded in the magazine.

M

...I don't know if it depends on the fact that I always try to keep my pistols clean, maybe I am lucky with the ammo, probably the good conditions of the magazines, but I always loaded 10 rounds in each mag of my P38 5,6mm and it always worked flawlessly.

Maybe I was lucky and I seized a good pistol, but I learned that malfunctioning and misfeed may often depends on the magazines more than on the pistols (mainly for worn springs or bent metal at the top of the magazine). This is why I tend to purchase a huge number of magazines for each pistol I own (at least 5 for pistol), to have the choice to test the correct working of each one of them and to leave the spring of the unloaded ones may rest when not in use.

P.S. The target was obtained in rapid fire (two hands) at 25 meters with ordinary FIOCCHI ammo (Maxac 22)
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,914 Posts
The Walther of Old --i.e., through the 1980s--had somewhat different ideas about what constituted acceptable reliability than some in the industry today. Consistency being the hallmark of quality, occasional excellent examples were not good enough; the average gun, picked at random off the shelf, had to meet the standard.

Years ago I shared a lot of time with Walther/Ulm's international sales manager, who watched the performance of their products very closely. It was he who stressed to me that with 5 rounds in the magazine of the .22 cal. P.38 it worked fine; with more than 5 one was asking for trouble. I never verified that for myself, but I respected his knowledge.

M
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
145 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I respected his knowledge

I do respect it too, so I am happy that I have been lucky with my Walther pistols, I use them once in a lifetime (so I admit that my experience is not so considerable) but when I do they always work flawlessly :D

That's why I love my Walthers, I know that I can always rely on them!

:cool:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
145 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Just a guess, but I'm guessing some European gunsmith cobbled up a 7.65mm barrel and an HP slide and popped them onto a military Walther frame to make a mystery gun. You'd have to take it apart and study the proof marks and individual characteristics of the parts to learn more about it. Judging from the front sight, it's a professional job.

M
Hi Mike, a friend from Deutschland just told me that it could be an original pistol and not a patchwork as I supposed it could be.... in his opinion "only a few hundreds of this version were made" directly from Walther using "simplified HP slides" on ordinary frames.
I couldn't find any trace but I agree with you that it is a very good work to be the work of a craftsman.
I confess that I am very confused :confused:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
145 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
....did I find an unicorn? :confused:
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
The HP was produced in 7.63 from 1935 - '37 and in 7,65 & 9mm from 1935 - '45. Also the serial No. is always on the LHS (front of trigger guard on frame). The slide on RHS has the full Walther banner and factory markings along with the calibre and model designation, i.e. HP. Other details to date the firearm are the firing pin, square or round, concealed extractor, dove tailed front sight to name but a few. Hope this helps.
 
1 - 20 of 47 Posts
Top