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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone have some tips I can try, or drills to practice to stop flinching when pulling the trigger?

I bought a P99 AS, but I'm posting this here, because I know for me this problem is not related to the trigger on this specific gun. I bought this weapon with the intent to carry (for me it strikes a balance of a smaller size that's concealable, but not too small for my hands). I also bought it knowing that the first shot has a long (!) trigger pull. I like the AS trigger and decocking feature on the gun, but I also know that I'm gonna have trouble not flinching on that first pull.

I know this trigger has a stop point about half-travel on the first pull, but the rest of the pull is still a little long, compared to the reset point on the subsequent shots. But again, I'm looking for a general drill to address flinching regardless of trigger pull length.

A couple weeks ago I shot a SIG and noticed I flinched several with that gun too.

I'm perfectly smooth when dry firing, and the sights remain right on target.

I was also planning to shoot several magazines with the pistol decocked for each shot, forcing the long trigger pull, working on this specifically and not focusing so much on the shot placement.

Any other tips, drills (loaded or unloaded) or practice techniques I could try? Is there something more than just lots of rounds. I'm already planning that...

I have not shot the gun yet, as I just picked it up two days ago. I recently shot a SIG 9MM and noticed I'm flinching, so I want to avoid this on my new gun right from the beginning.

Some more info, for what it's worth. I am not new to shooting, having grown up in a gun-owning family. We shot everything from 22's for plinking to large caliber rifles for deer and elk hunting, and a number of pistols in various calibers. We shot a considerable amount as it's my dad's go-to outdoor activity. I haven't shot in years however, and am just getting back into it.

Thanks in advance...

Tony
 

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Dry fire helps a lot as long as you remember to focus on the same motions with live fire. A good test to tell if your practice is working is to mix in some snap caps when you do live fire. Not knowing if its live or dry fire takes some of the stress out and allows you to see what's really happening when you're expecting a live one.

Have a friend load your mags or load them and mix them up so you don't know when the dummy round is coming. Its also good practice for malfunctions (in the very rare event the p99 does malfunction)
 
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