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At a gunshow, I took on trade a German made PPK from 1968. It had the American eagle grips with the large eagle with the resting wings. The grips say "imported for Interarms " or something like that. It is a 9mm (.380) and in excellent condition. I was asking some Walther guys at the Market Hall gunshow in Dallas last weekend, and they said the gun was in the 800.00 to
1k range. It is in excellent condition with one color matched finger extended mag and two flush mags. All mags are Walther manufature. It does not have the box. I thought this was the place to ask. My area is S&W revolvers and I am clueless on this model. Were these guys shooting staraight or were they trying to get it at a deal? Thanks in advance for your help.
Many
 

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If it is in like new condition, I would say they were in the ballpark. It would be worth more with the original box, test target and papers, that would get it to 1000 to 1200. I have seen good ones go for 650 to 700 also, missing stuff though, like box, etc.

The grips are not that rare, Interarms attempt to get around the import stamping law I think. Is Interarms only on the eagle grip, or is it also on the right front of the slide?
 

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The grips are not as common as the regular ones... they had a short lived period as Interarms sure was trying to get around the Import laws with marking the grips and not the slide or frame
 

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Interarms sure was trying to get around the Import laws with marking the grips and not the slide or frame
Bless them for that!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
If it is in like new condition, I would say they were in the ballpark. It would be worth more with the original box, test target and papers, that would get it to 1000 to 1200. I have seen good ones go for 650 to 700 also, missing stuff though, like box, etc.

The grips are not that rare, Interarms attempt to get around the import stamping law I think. Is Interarms only on the eagle grip, or is it also on the right front of the slide?

The slide is not stamped.
 

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I'd love to see a pic of those grips from Interarms with the eagle!
 

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banddr2, I dunno if those are the grips he's talking about. He said they were late 1960's Interarms grips with an eagle. Somehow, I don't think Interarms was making the Nazi-era Eagles with their emblem....
 

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I have 2 9mmK American Eagle gripped PPKs. One has brown grips and the other has black grips. As far as I know these grips were only used in early 1968. Once the the customs people saw these grips and no permanent import stamps on the pistols, Interams was told this shipment can come through but the ensuing ones MUST be stamped per GCA 1968. It's obvious they gave Interarms a pass on them because there are too many that appear on the market every year for them to have come in illegally. I don't think they have any more value than any other Walther German contracted PPK post war grips.
Recently I've seen a 1968 mfg. PP with the same Eagle on the right grip. It was a first for me. I don't know if any US imported 1968 PPKs in 7.65 have these grips but I would guess the answer was they did also.

In fact, I carefully store them and replace with non marked grips. I look specifically for these Eagle Walthers to buy because they have no markings other than the Carl Walther information and the German nitro proofing stamps on them.

HTH
 

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Thiokol, thanks! I had no idea what the grips would look like, but now that you posted them, they flashed back in memory from when I was a little kid. I've seen those somewhere before. Probably at a gun show or something. I remember my dad saying how he had a '66 PPK and that they were really going up in price. This would have been around 1977 or so.

Those grips are very rare! I think $800 is a very reasonable price for that gun!
 

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The importation of Walther pistols from Ulm commenced in 1961. Prior to the effective date of the Gun Control Act of 1968 (Dec. 16, 1968) there was no requirement for any marking on an imported pistol other than to indicate the country of origin, which was required by the Lanham Act. The marking did not have to be permanent; it only had to be such as to reasonably reach and inform the first retail purchaser; a removeable sticker would have sufficed.

M
 

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Thiokol, thanks! I had no idea what the grips would look like, but now that you posted them, they flashed back in memory from when I was a little kid. I've seen those somewhere before. Probably at a gun show or something. I remember my dad saying how he had a '66 PPK and that they were really going up in price. This would have been around 1977 or so.

Those grips are very rare! I think $800 is a very reasonable price for that gun!
I have to respectfully disagree with you. The grips ad no value whatsoever to a 1968 PPK. In fact, most PPK collectors probably don't like them. I know I don't. I review ads for PPKs about 4-5 times a week on about 4-5 websites. A 1968 PPK with the Eagle grips doesn't advertise or sell any higher than a 1967 or earlier PPK without the eagle grips. The bottom line is a very good condition PPK at $800 even without the box and accessories is a decent deal in the current market. I've never seen a set of the grips alone for sale, but if I did and the asking price was more than say, $40-$50 I'd laugh out loud. I might consider a new set of unmarked pre 68 grips as high as $90 or so......
 

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I just bought a '68 with the Eagle Grips

I found a LNIB '68 .380 PPK and purchased it, recently. Complete package: Box, target, manual, cleaning rod and tools, two mags, two sets of grips, and a shoulder holster...all matching numbers. Two interesting things to point out (and reasons I was very interested in this model). I, for one, think the eagle grips look cool, and they were only available for a short time. As others have pointed out, though, they add zero value to the pistol. Let me tell you what does, though. The early '68 PPK is a completely GERMAN pistol. This particular model had the eagle grips placed on the gun by interarms. The pistol, as is the case with mine, also came with the brown factory grips. If I remove the eagle grips and place on the classic brown ones, I have a PPK without any import markings...anywhere. The pistol doesn't even have "Made in West Germany" printed on the side. All frame markings are German. I suppose it's possible that the "American Market" giveaway would be the serial number, but that would be the only clue as to its final destination. My search for a great German-built PPK took me far and wide, and for me (and possibly no one else) there is an added value in the fact that it has zero US-market markings on the metal.
 

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I found a LNIB '68 .380 PPK and purchased it, recently. Complete package: Box, target, manual, cleaning rod and tools, two mags, two sets of grips, and a shoulder holster...all matching numbers. Two interesting things to point out (and reasons I was very interested in this model). I, for one, think the eagle grips look cool, and they were only available for a short time. As others have pointed out, though, they add zero value to the pistol. Let me tell you what does, though. The early '68 PPK is a completely GERMAN pistol. This particular model had the eagle grips placed on the gun by interarms. The pistol, as is the case with mine, also came with the brown factory grips. If I remove the eagle grips and place on the classic brown ones, I have a PPK without any import markings...anywhere. The pistol doesn't even have "Made in West Germany" printed on the side. All frame markings are German. I suppose it's possible that the "American Market" giveaway would be the serial number, but that would be the only clue as to its final destination. My search for a great German-built PPK took me far and wide, and for me (and possibly no one else) there is an added value in the fact that it has zero US-market markings on the metal.
Well, s^&, Gunshot7, that's what I like about 'em too. It appeals the the romantic or dreamer in some of us that we can imagine the pistol being bought and used somewhere on "the continent"
Just replied to your other post and pics. We are all very happy for you:)
 
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