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Having been on the Beretta forum a bit, I've found out the locking blocks on the Beretta 92 last for quite a while, depending on what generation locking block your 92 M9 pistol has. The early locking blocks last to around ~15k rounds, while the 3rd generation locking block on the 92 series can last up to 25-30k rounds.

By contrast, how do the Walther P38/P1 locking blocks compare? Is there an interval that Walther suggests replacing the block at? So far, I haven't found any info on that number.
 

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What, me worry?

I have yet to shoot any single Walther 9mm pistol 15,000 rounds, much less 25-30K.

M
 

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German steel was so much better than Italian one....

I heard through the grapevine that the first Beretta 92/98 locking blocks were made of steel of superior quality but there is no certification about it... probably just a rumour

;)
 

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The difference goes beyond the steel quality.

The P38/P5 design has more AND larger contact/wear surfaces when compared to the Beretta 92 design.


The P38 has a middle of barrel/front of slide and frame locking lug, the P5 has a front of barrel/front of slide and frame locking lug. The 92 has no locking lug in the mid or forward position.
 

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My two 9mm P5 shooters have had over 1500 rds put thru them this year, in the hands of almost a dozen shooters. All of it has been 124gr/1200fps (~400 ft/lbs energy), or hotter.


The Lang frame (middle, target grips) has the 6# recoil springs, so it's shot sparingly (don't want to crack the frame on a number matching Lang).
The carry gun frame (top, G4U grips) has 8# recoil springs, so it serves double duty, gets shot as it sits in the pic, AND has the Lang barrel/slide swapped on for even more shooting. The Deutschebank P5 (bottom, black grips) has the 6# recoil springs, and only comes to the range when 7.65Para (30 Luger) is getting shot.


The carry gun was slightly used when purchased (my 1st shooter), and it has over 1400 rds this year. With WC Universal Oil, I've not seen much additional wear at all.
 

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Is there an interval that Walther suggests replacing the block at? So far, I haven't found any info on that number.
The reason you haven't seen any spec from Walther is because there isn't any.

Locking blocks were selectively fitted from various sizes at the Walther factory (or in a Bundeswehr arsenal) to achieve correct block-to-barrel fit, correct block-to-slide fit, and correct headspace, by people who presumably knew what they were doing. I would be awfully reluctant to arbitrarily replace the locking block with another that I got in the mail and hope that I get it right. It might do more harm than good and introduce a problem I didn't have before.

Fortunately a locking block (or a slide for that matter) that is going to fail usually cracks first. If you pay attention when cleaning the gun (a pastime many here seem obsessed with), you'll see it long before it breaks.

Until then, whether the block is forged or cast, I suggest leaving it alone. The locking block is intended to last the service life of the P.38, not a part designed to be periodically replaced. When and if the gun becomes unserviceable, more than likely it will be because something else happened first.

M
 
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