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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
My new PPQ is my 1st Walther gun, and having fallen totally in love with it, I have a new respect for the company and want to speak of it properly.

So my question is, how do you personally pronounce the name when you're at the gun store or the range? Do you pronounce it VALTER , or do you use the anglicized W and TH?

...and does anyone know how they pronounce it in Fort Smith?
 

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Pronounce Walther

Well, my legal immigrant grandfather pronounced his name with the "V". However his sons always said Walther and I have too for 75+ years.
 

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In German, W's are pronounced as V's.

"Was ist loss?" (Vus ist loas?) "What is happening or What is going on?

W's are V's, V's are F's etc etc etc. :D
 

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In a recent video available on YouTube, we can hear Peter Dallhammer (Product Manager of Carl Walther GmbH, Germany) pronouncing the name of Walther in both American and German styles:

 

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There you go - I saw the video and was impressed by his language skills. Using the American pronunciation was no accident I'm sure.
 

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There you go - I saw the video and was impressed by his language skills. Using the American pronunciation was no accident I'm sure.
He had to because he could see all the perplexed RCA dog cocked heads swimming in confusion when he pronounced it correctly.

I see patients with unusual and foreign names every day. When they tell me how they pronounce their name, that is how I pronounce it. I don’t tell them how they should pronounce their name just because they are here. When I am familiar with the language and already know how to pronounce their name, they are appreciative that I’ve done so. It’s rude to repeatedly say their name incorrectly when they have already said how it is pronounced.

But just like the guy did in the video, I usually have to mispronounce Walther just because most people can only read and pronounce it phonetically in American English.

That said, the correct pronunciation is, “Valta” with emphasis on the “al” and a half-a$$ed “r” on the end.

I didn’t stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night, but I have seen every episode of Hogan’s Heroes a million times. That makes me a certified internet expert in bad German accents.


And don’t call me Shirley.
 

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+1 However you want!

But...

Auf Deutsch: generally Vahl-ter (although depending dialect it could be a little different...more like a hard "TH" sound)
In "American": wahl-thur

The real funny folks are the ones that say, Mayercedess-bentz or Bay-Em-Vay here in the US. Or..."Volkz-vahggen"...lol
 

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Also eigentlich spricht man Walther mit einem weichen "V" aus.....;-)

Walther is spoken with a soft "V" in the beginning. The regular "V" is maostly spoken like a "F" in german.
So you have to speak soft (I feel set back to school, where the irish teacher, wo gave us english class, made us repeat and repeat and repeat the "th" because most germans pronounce the "th" like a "f"...

So, take the "v" from vaseline" and pronounce the "a" short and it should come out halfway german.........if not don`t worry and do what I do......I just say I´m a foreigner, I am allowed to talk crapy......;-)
 

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So, take the "v" from vaseline" and pronounce the "a" short and it should come out halfway german.
I agree on the "v" but I'm not so convinced about the short "a". The English word "vaseline" sounds like "wässelin" for a German speaker I'd say. Okay, I know it's a little bit cheeky of me to call myself a native German speaker.

In the international phonetic notation, Walther is written as [ˈvaltɐ]. So to write and pronounce it as "Vahl-ter" in more colloquial English seems to me the way to go. There's no need to fear that an English speaker would pronounce it as "Fahl-ter" as German speakers do for their native German words ("deutsche Erbwörter").
 

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A furiner? Is you legal, er just one of them double naught spies?
hey, I´m an imigrant in Germany.........

I is more legal then most of ther Germans and more German then most Germans are......I speak german dialect (Hessisch)...da kann ich so richtig losbabbele un kei Sau versteht mich....;-)
 

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...da kann ich so richtig losbabbele un kei Sau versteht mich....;-)
I understand you...a little. But I don’t recognize some of it...of course, I’m probably wrong about the half I think I do understand too.
 

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I'm a Merican. I say "Wall ther". That seems to be the most used American/English pronunciation. I'll stick with that.

I realize they may not be the most correct pronunciation in German. Then again I live in the USA.

Imagine the US if you tried to pronounce every name or word with the accents and intonation from the language the name came from.

Armenian name in Armenian?
Serbian in Serbian?
Uzbekistani in Ubek?
Polish names in Polish?
Chinese names in Mandarin?

Good luck with that. Completely unworkable in a country as diverse as the US.

I do speak a foreign language and enjoy it. I grew up with it. It's my heritage. Its completely unrealistic though to expect anyone to know the nuances of all the world's languages and dialects.

Ok. Rant off. Maybe I'll go back to decaf.
 

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So are you saying that if you meet that Armenian whose name you don’t know how to pronounce and you ask them, or they tell you, how to pronounce it, that you’re just going to make up another pronunciation and tell them they’re in ‘Murcia now so that’s not how you’re going to say it?

I get it if you have difficulty with the pronunciation due to an entirely different language, but you don’t even try to respect their name?

It’s not just names from other languages, there are a LOT of English words I don’t yet know how to pronounce. And they come from all different languages and dialects..our whole language is built off of others, that’s nothing new. When I come across a new word, I learn how to say it properly because that’s how you say it.

I don’t know, I guess it doesn’t matter to me how we pronounce Walther since it’s not an individual who I personally have met or know. But I will at least try to pronounce a person’s name correctly just like I would like them to do with me.
 
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