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Would you be interested in either a PPK-L or PPK/S-L?

  • YES

    Votes: 27 73.0%
  • NO

    Votes: 10 27.0%
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)


In the USA, there are >17M people who legally carry, either with CCWs or under Constitutional Carry laws.
https://crimeresearch.org/tag/annual-report-on-number-of-concealed-handgun-permits/

The James Bond/OO7 flicks are more popular now than they've been since the 1960s and he's back to using a PPK (albeit a PPK/S). :D

I'm sure there's a LOT of guys, maybe even gals too, who would like to CCW a PPK. But it has a major weakness compared to its modern polymer framed competition (Kahr P380, Ruger LCP, etc): it's weight. But there is be solution: reintroduce the PPK-L.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walther_PP#PPK-L

S&W has been selling revolvers made of aluminum-scandium alloy for >20 years. Since it has proven itself strong enough for .357 mag and .44 mag, it should be strong enough for even .380

Walther could license S&W to build PPK-Ls for them. (They've had experience dealing with each other in the past when S&W was making PPK & PPK/S.) Or Walther could license S&W's alloy formula and make them themselves. Or, if the alloy is no longer protected by patents, Walther could just make it themselves.

Personally, I'd LOVE a Scandium alloy PPK-L in 7.65mm/.32 acp -- a light recoiling light PPK.

How do we get Walther to look into this??? (I'm assuming scandium-aluminum alloy will work as well in a semi as a revolver (e.g., no galling issues).)
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Forgot to mention: assuming the weight savings will be approx the same as the original PPK-L, it will take the 7.65/.32 version down from 21 oz (590 g) to 17 oz (480 g): almost a 20% reduction in weight
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Slightly Off Topic, but ....

The Wiki entry on the PPK-L doesn't say much.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walther_PP#PPK-L

Does anyone know what year it was introduced?

What year they stopped offering it? Why they stopped? (Frame problems? low demand in the pre-Shall Issue CCW era? '68 Gun Control Act (and not wanting to make a PPK/S-L?)

How many were made worldwide?

How many imported into the USA?
 

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I'd be interested if the damn beaver tail were done away with and the specs returned to original. But that's just me personally. I have no issues with slide bite on the original design, but the new one cuts into my hand (the irony).
 
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If the new production PPK(/S) sells extremely well, then I could see Walther introducing a redesigned "PPK M2" of sorts with a polymer frame.

If they wanted to, they could always just use the design of the CCP M2 as the basis for a PPK M2 in 9mm Luger, which I could see being a big hit considering that the CCP has already been successful in spite of being extremely ugly, ergo taking the same gun and giving it a more retro, streamlined appearance reminiscent of the classic PP Series could only sell all the better.

I would definitely be interested in a lightweight PPK.
 
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Does anyone know what year it was introduced?

What year they stopped offering it? Why they stopped? (Frame problems? low demand in the pre-Shall Issue CCW era? '68 Gun Control Act (and not wanting to make a PPK/S-L?)
The post-war lightweight models PPK (.22lr and 7.65mm) were manufactured from 1954 until 1982. Most of the Walther models are marked as PPK-L whereas the Manurhin models don't show any special designation. Serial numbers in the 50000 range were used for the lightweight models.
 

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The James Bond/OO7 flicks are more popular now than they've been since the 1960s and he's back to using a PPK (albeit a PPK/S).
Actually, in one of the newer Bond movies they talk of a PPKS, but the S does not stand for Special, but for Signature. The shown props model has the dimensions of a normal PPK.
 

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And be sure to include your suggestions on reviving the "Strategic Alliance" with S&W.

M

hahahahahahahahahaha
I just snorted a mouth full of wine all over my keyboard
 

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Discussion Starter #13
The post-war lightweight models PPK (.22lr and 7.65mm) were manufactured from 1954 until 1982. Most of the Walther models are marked as PPK-L whereas the Manurhin models don't show any special designation. Serial numbers in the 50000 range were used for the lightweight models.
Any idea why they stopped producing the -L in '82? That was just a few years before the modern "Shall Issue" movement started in FL and swept the nation. IOW, right before demand for lighter PPKs suitable for concealed carry increased.
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
Actually, in one of the newer Bond movies they talk of a PPKS, but the S does not stand for Special, but for Signature. The shown props model has the dimensions of a normal PPK.
Really? It's hard to tell from 1:52 in this video due to the angle and the fat wrap around grips:

I guess if someone has DVDs of Skyfall on, they can see how many shots Bond can shoot before needing to reload and determine from that (assuming full mags and one up the spout).

What I notice is that the outside lower edge of the side of the slide in front of the trigger is not beveled. Plus, only the "Walther" banner roll markings on that side of the slide.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Why don't you just write them a letter?

And be sure to include your suggestions on reviving the "Strategic Alliance" with S&W.

M
Might just do that. (Although I'll wait to find out if you were being sarcastic re. S&W first. ;))


Do Walther reps ever visit here or have an account on here?
 

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How is an all steel PPK too heavy to carry?

they can see how many shots Bond can shoot before needing to reload and determine from that (assuming full mags and one up the spout)
Not sure which movie but I think he fired 11 from a PPK when he was on the range after getting his ass kicked.
 

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Montoya, you are being led down the garden path.
Thus far, Walther hasn't deigned to make a steel PPK, let alone an alloy one.

If a Glock 42 is too modern, Sig makes a Waltheresque .32 as the 230; a little bigger and very gracefully/handsomely made, and with an alloy frame.
Moon
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
How is an all steel PPK too heavy to carry?
I didn't say that. I said, with emphasis added:

I'm sure there's a LOT of guys, maybe even gals too, who would like to CCW a PPK. But it has a major weakness compared to its modern polymer framed competition (Kahr P380, Ruger LCP, etc): it's weight. But there is be solution: reintroduce the PPK-L.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walther_PP#PPK-L
Not sure which movie but I think he fired 11 from a PPK when he was on the range after getting his ass kicked.
Ha! You're right. Not sure if it was 10 or 11, but so much for trying to figure it out that way.

 

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Discussion Starter #19

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So, what are these made of?
Right now pure unobtanium. Walther USA has been telling us they would be releasing these for several years. I'll believe it when a forum member gets a hold of one. But cynicism aside I would like to see them succeed.
 
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