Walther Forums banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,363 Posts
Jeeze, talk about a clockwork orange... :eek:

Thanks for the interesting link, Geo. I remember reading about those crazy things, and their deadliness sprang from the slight shot dispersal of the 3 shot burst. Really increased the hit probability.
Wonder how they sealed the breech without a casing.
Moon
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,792 Posts
If I'm not mistaken, the G11 was designed and produced pre-1975.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,914 Posts
The G11 represented very innovative firearms technology that was far ahead of its time. The ammunition was shaped like an elongated cube, with the bullet completely enclosed. A small booster charge pushed the bullet into the bore to seal it before the propellant ignited and consumed the rest including the primer. The magazine was mounted horizontally over the barrel, holding the cartridges perpendicular to the bore, bullets pointed down. The breechblock was cylindrical and non-reciprocating with respect to the barrel; it formed the chamber and rotated vertically 90 degrees to feed, then fire.

It had a long, difficult and costly gestation. Most of the technical problems --particularly the risk of "cook-off" of its caseless ammunition--were eventually overcome more or less satisfactorily, and the gun/ammunition demonstrated significant advances in full-auto hit capability. Using a lafette "balanced" (or "floating") recuperating arrangement, a three-round burst would exit the muzzle before the action bottomed out and the shooter felt any recoil.

Whether all this was cost-effective was the real issue. The steep price of converting to, and maintaining, this system as NATO standard had to be faced at a time when political and other military considerations made such expenditures seem exorbitant. Ultimately that doomed the G11.

Still, elements of its design have found more conventional application and their selective employment is seen elsewhere. Dynamit Nobel's development for the G11 program of propellant to withstand higher temperatures without cook-off is an obvious advantage in current full-auto rifles that fire from a closed bolt, and the idea of squeezing several shots into a single rearward movement of the barrel/bolt assembly has been successfully utilized in other weapons firing conventional brass-cased ammunition.

I don't think we've seen the end of the H&K G11 and its caseless ammunition. But their re-emergence will have to await some fundamental changes in the political and military climate.

M
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,756 Posts
I don't see an ejection port. Which in a way, makes sense, being that it fires a case-less round.

But I'm just curious how someone is to clear or unload this rifle? Also, what do you do with a failure to fire?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,914 Posts
In case of a misfire, rotating the action feeds an incoming round which pushes the previous one down and out the bottom. Rather like the ejection in an '08 Maxim gun, which goes to show how little is really new.

M
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,535 Posts
But I'm just curious how someone is to clear or unload this rifle? Also, what do you do with a failure to fire?
ForgottenWeapons did a half hour video on the G11 filmed at HK back in December. It's definitely worth watching.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,914 Posts
ForgottenWeapons did a half hour video on the G11 filmed at HK back in December. It's definitely worth watching.
I just watched that video, and Ian McCollum did a really marvelous job on it. Equally informative are some of the comments posted by viewers, especially on the ammunition.

M
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top