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Discussion Starter #1
Ok folks...got my lead levels tested and it is 10. Not horrible but not great.

I shoot indoors mostly. 1 to 3 times a week. I don’t load. I don’t use good hygiene habits. That’s changing.
 

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Ok folks...got my lead levels tested and it is 10. Not horrible but not great.

I shoot indoors mostly. 1 to 3 times a week. I don’t load. I don’t use good hygiene habits. That’s changing.
My range is indoors. I never thought to check this out. Though I don’t shoot quite as much as you, maybe an hour once per week at the most, it might be good to do so. I just read the side effects of lead toxicity and you were right to think about this.

Thanks for raising up this topic.
 
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Discussion Starter #5
I honestly think it’s a big issue. If you do a little research, you will see that the problem exists and is very common.

No level is completely safe either. It’s gets absorbed and stored in your bone marrow.

Indoor ranges are not regulated for air circulation and you can control what people next to you shoot.

Levels below 10 are “ok”. Start getting over 20 and people will start to visit the doctor with complaints of ailments where lead is later uncovered as a root cause.

Your body will eliminate it. It’s really bad for children and worse for women.

My plan is to do the following:

- Shoot less

- Don’t shoot when the range is crowded.

- I have ordered de lead soap and wipes. Use a pair of shoes for range only use. Wipe down my bags and guns with lead wipes. Clean my hands and face.

- Change clothes when I get home.

- If that doesn’t help I will wear a respirator.

I am starting to instruct so my exposure will increase somewhat. Though I can wear a mask and much of it is classroom. I won’t be as close to the weapons either.

Will recheck in 3-4 months
 

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No level is completely safe either. It’s gets absorbed and stored in your bone marrow.
Unless the form is organic it can not be absorbed through the skin (dermally).....the molecule is far too large. However it can be inhaled or ingested....I assume that's what you were referring to? Does your range allow the use of lead bullets....mine does not?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
That is correct. Inhaled, drank or eaten. Once in the body I think it stores in the marrow.

Yes...they allow lead. But I think the issue is more with lead used in many primers.

If you shoot regularly, get it tested.
 

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There has been and continued concerns over lead related issues at indoor shooting ranges. Lawsuits, illnesses, OSHA investigations just to name a few. It's been going on for years, but never addressed as a public health issue. Not only is it a serious health hazard for the shooter, numerous employees all over the country have fallen ill as a result of every day exposure. There are some fixes and precautions that shooters and range owners can take. But the later will cost the range owner big bucks for upgrades.
 

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There is a special therapy for removing lead from the body.
Didn't Your doctor say so?..

Some products, such as beets, also work.
Perhaps not as effective as medicines, but not with such harm.

And the harm from lead, yes, is irreversible... :-(
 

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By the today's reply I got aware of this thread.
Do you have indoor ranges in the USA without an intense and mandatory tested air circulation?
 

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GMork, in my area in Illinois, it appears to be the case, as wherever I go there are air filtration and circulation systems, as well as noise and dust filters in place.
 

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Im unaware of amy federal laws. This is more likely regulated at the state level. Here in TX my indoor range has strong ventilation and lead-removing hand soap for use afterwards. Nothing more than that.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Any indoor range I have been too has filtration systems. But none of them “work” in the sense that if you pull the trigger while holding a gun, you will get dust in your face. It’s proven over and over again, that regardless of what filtration is used, indoor ranges pose more issues than outdoor. Poor filtration is obviously a bigger concern.

Regulated? Not that I am aware of other than perhaps OSHA. But that would be for employees who are exposed and not the general public. Range employees are also not required to be tested, which is unfortunate.

I really don’t think think the occasional shooter or even the regular shooter understands the risks involved.

I am actually considering masking up.
 

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Some newer designed indoor ranges use a once through air flow pattern with fresh air inlet behind the shooter and the air flows downrange.

Even though, there could still be some low flow spots at the shooting position.
 

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Wikipedia: There are an estimated 16,000 to 18,000 indoor firing ranges in operation in the United States.

(I googled: "number of indoor shooting ranges")
 

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I shoot indoors once a month t maintain proficiency. I shoot Winchester 9mm 147gr Train ammo. It uses lead free primers so at least I am not inhaling lead from my own shots vapor. I shoot only when the range is empty or nearly so, like at 10:30 AM or 2:30 PM. I would never shoot indoor if there were a outdoor range near me.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I shoot indoors once a month t maintain proficiency. I shoot Winchester 9mm 147gr Train ammo. It uses lead free primers so at least I am not inhaling lead from my own shots vapor. I shoot only when the range is empty or nearly so, like at 10:30 AM or 2:30 PM. I would never shoot indoor if there were a outdoor range near me.
You apparently don’t live where it gets to -35
 

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I've been to a few ranges with good ventilation and some with absolutely terrible ventilation.


I don't visit the ones with bad ventilation anymore. It's unpleasant - especially when someone starts dumping with some dirty, dirty range ammo in the booth next to you. God help you if they bring out the .22LR


Outdoor ranges also aren't as rough on your hearing... another benefit to consider.


In either case outdoor or indoor, I always try to wash my hands immediately after shooting or cleaning my firearms. I try to remove my clothes and shower a soon as possible after shooting as well.
 

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We are tested every 6 months. Our range has top of the line filtration. The air is pulled downrange and is replaced every 3 minutes. Even with that we occasionally have employees go over the limit. The employees that do are big time shooters. One customer even tried to sue (tossed out) over his lead levels. The biggest culprit is food and drink and not using DLead wipes or soap. NEVER eat or drink inside the range.
 
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