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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, am new to the forum and the lucky new owner of a IA Walther PPK. It used to be my dads!!! The thing is it seems that somehow the rear sight felt off and i was wondering where can i find a stock rear sight and/or an aftermarket one. Thanks in advance.

Heres a couple of pictures



SpeedXP
 

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Hi there.
I see from your photos that your handgun is an Interarms product. I had a problem with a broken extractor on one, and had a problem getting the part (this was around last Christmas). I called Earl's Repair Service (978-851-2656 or 540-921-0184), who told me the difference between the pistols made by Interarms, and those made in Germany and by Smith & Wesson. They put me in touch with a guy in Delaware who has parts for, and can fix the Interarms handguns...I don't know where I wrote his contact information down, but he has a website and was very professional to deal with.
Hope this helps.
 

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Thanks a lot for your responses, i just wrote M & M an email to ask if they have the rear sight. Is there an aftermarket one i can use in case they don't have it in stock?


Thx
 

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Thanks a lot for your responses, i just wrote M & M an email to ask if they have the rear sight. Is there an aftermarket one i can use in case they don't have it in stock?
This shouldn't be a hard part to track down. If M&M doesn't have it, check back for additional sources.
 

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The pics didn't come up, so I'm not sure if the OP's gun is stainless or blue.
The M&M lead is a good one; they have a sparkling rep around here.
Another possibility is Numrich Arms, who specialize in gun parts.
Also, do we know if the S&Walther sight will fit the Interarms?
BTW, those sights have been known to come adrift. A now-departed example that I had (prolly the .380) had a badly fit rear sight.
Moon
 

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Speed, at the risk of telling you something you already know, you'll need a brass drift to use when tapping the sight into place without marring it. A fat brass machine screw will serve nicely if you haven't a drift.
If the sight's an excessively loose fit, you'll want to use a center punch to raise some divots in the bottom of the slide dovetail to tighten up the fit.
Moon
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Speed, at the risk of telling you something you already know, you'll need a brass drift to use when tapping the sight into place without marring it. A fat brass machine screw will serve nicely if you haven't a drift.
If the sight's an excessively loose fit, you'll want to use a center punch to raise some divots in the bottom of the slide dovetail to tighten up the fit.
Moon
Thanks for the advice! Do you think ill need to take it to a gunsmith or this is a DIY project?

Thanks in advance.
 

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Thanks for the response!! Do you think that ill have to take it to a gunsmith or this is an easy DIY project?
 

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Thanks for the response!! Do you think that ill have to take it to a gunsmith or this is an easy DIY project?
If (no small if) everything is in spec, it should be a simple 'tap it in, carefully' deal. If you are even reasonably handy, you should be able to manage it. The sight is meant to be held by friction alone, and is also meant to be driftable to zero the gun for windage.
If you get in trouble, come back and ask.
Moon
 

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If (no small if) everything is in spec, it should be a simple 'tap it in, carefully' deal.
Moon,

Agreed that it should be a simple fix, but is this sight one of those slide-in parts that should only be introduced to the sight dovetail from left to right, or vice-versa? I never had occasion to remove the rear sight on mine as it was dead on.
 

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The dark shadow of Bubba is looming....
Aw, c'mon Mike, are you going to advocate that the OP not get his/her feet wet on this simple fix?

In this case, why wait to be put into the queue for weeks, then pay a gunsmith whatever bench fee they charge ($75-100 per hour), plus the value of the part for 10-minutes of work? I have taken many guns down to the individual parts just to see and obtain knowledge of how they function, and enjoy doing so. I find it relaxing. On occasion, I've had a few bumps along the way, i.e. springs flying every which way, as maybe you have had in the past - but chalk that up to learning. If you don't take the baby steps, you don't learn to walk. It's up to the OP to know his/her boundaries on this particular fix, but as gunsmithing goes, this is chapter 1, section 1 material at most...

Obviously, if one feels unqualified and uncomfortable doing this work, then one ought not try it.

That's
when Bubba shows up.
 

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Aw, c'mon Mike, are you going to advocate that the OP not get his/her feet wet on this simple fix?

In this case, why wait to be put into the queue for weeks, then pay a gunsmith whatever bench fee they charge ($75-100 per hour), plus the value of the part for 10-minutes of work? I have taken many guns down to the individual parts just to see and obtain knowledge of how they function, and enjoy doing so. I find it relaxing. On occasion, I've had a few bumps along the way, i.e. springs flying every which way, as maybe you have had in the past - but chalk that up to learning. If you don't take the baby steps, you don't learn to walk. It's up to the OP to know his/her boundaries on this particular fix, but as gunsmithing goes, this is chapter 1, section 1 material at most...

Obviously, if one feels unqualified and uncomfortable doing this work, then one ought not try it.

That's
when Bubba shows up.
On the contrary, I do advocate it. When one doesn't know how to do a technical job correctly, an intelligent person takes it to someone who does. It's often cheaper than correcting the mistakes and repairing the damage.

You don't know anything about the OP. You know nothing of his level of understanding, or his tools, his experience, or his skill. Instead of urging him on, why don't you first ask if he has a bench vise, and knows how to clamp a stripped slide into it without crushing or scratching it? Or maybe even if he knows how to strip the slide? Does the sight go in right to left, or left to right? What do you do if it is too loose? Or too tight?

I've seen too many guns scarred or wrecked by guys who thought Chapter 1, Section 1 was far too elementary for them. They spent 20 minutes on some forum, learned all they thought they needed and were ready for a high-wire act.

Roy F. Dunlap, one of the greatest gunsmiths who ever wrote a book (Gunsmithing, Stackpole, 1963) devoted his first 4 chapters (the first 64 pages) to the following topics: 1) The Workshop, 2) Basic tools, 3) Extra and Special Tools, 4) Reference Books and Sources of Supply. One gets to fitting sights in dovetail slots on page 406.

If you want to learn how to do gunsmithing correctly, get a book. If you don't want to read, pay a gunsmith to let you watch.

M
 

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The OP will have to decide his own limitations, but I've gotta vote with AMA on this one; putting in the sight should be pretty straightforward; I'll toss in the caveat that if it isn't a chip shot, then it's time to stop and ask a bunch of questions.
My particular part of the woods is very much gun country, but there is a serious dearth of gunsmiths, so many of us have had to 'learn as we go'. With some pride, I've got to say I've never 'bubbaed' anything, but I'll lay that off to taking it slow and not getting all medieval on a contrary part.

Back to the OP; the Walther schematic diagrams show the sight off to right, which indicates to me that 'right is right' for both installation and removal.
A padded-jaw vise would be helpful, but a woodblock on a workbench should do it. Allow for the safety lever, and have a relieved area under the slide where the lever protrudes. With the safety on the lower, left, side of the slide, you'll then want to install the sight from the right.
At the risk of stating the obvious, the painted stripe below the sight notch should be toward the rear.
When your part shows up, let us know if it can be at be at least partially slipped into the notch. We'll offer some guidance from there.
All that said, if the OP is the least bit tentative about the work, then take Mike's advice and get thee to a gunsmith. It's false economy to do it yourself if you damage the gun.
Moon
 

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In my case, I had a loose rear sight and took it to Mike at M&M. I had tried using both blue and red loctite, without success. As I didn't have a vise or the tools required, the choice was easy. He fixed my sight in no time,and it gave me an opportunity to learn something about my pistol. Also picked up an extra magazine as well. Very satisfied with his services.
 

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In my case, I had a loose rear sight and took it to Mike at M&M. I had tried using both blue and red loctite, without success. As I didn't have a vise or the tools required, the choice was easy. He fixed my sight in no time,and it gave me an opportunity to learn something about my pistol.
Can you share with the forum what he did to fix it?
 
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