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All,
I need some help with identifying the marks on a PPK I just inherited and understanding with they mean. Pics are included. Starting with the slide, I know the gun was manufactured in 1966 in Ulm, West Germany by the "66" and the symbol that looks like one side of a deer's antler. The manufacture in 1966 is supported by another resource I found in the forums that provided the relationship between the serial number and year of manufacture. The symbol to the right of the deer antler also appears on the receiver at the end of the serial number and on the other side of the gun. Elsewhere in these forums I found something that says it means "definitive nitro proof for all guns". What does that mean? Also, on another sight, I saw some differentiation on the safety and how far it rotates. This one appears to rotate 90 degrees counterclockwise. It seems to be rather standard on Walther handguns and I wonder if there are some that are different.

I appreciate any information. Thank You!

Air gun Trigger Wood Gun barrel Gun accessory
Air gun Trigger Wood Gun barrel Revolver
 

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First picture is OK and leads to a 60's PPK, second pic is too small to see SN and markings.
90° safety is pre war, your gun is post war. May be '66.
 

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The “eagle over N” stamp is consistent on all German firearms, up until a few years ago (now the stamp is a "CIP over N" stamp). The eagle is a federal insignia in Germany and in this case is indicative of the firearm’s acceptance according to government standards. The N stands for nitrocellulose and means that the firearm has been approved for safe use with nitrocellulose-based gunpowder. In order to obtain this certification, the firearm must successfully fire two rounds of ammunition that have been loaded 30% hotter than the accepted maximum caliber specification.

The antler symbol means that your PPK was sent to the Ulm, Germany proof house for acceptance. At the time there were 7 proof houses, each with their own symbol.

The safety lever on your pistol is a 60 degree throw. The 60 degree throw was seen on PPK's around 1935. Before that they had 90 degree throws. Various reasons as to why Walther changed over to the 60 degree throw, mainly easier to manipulate.

Your second picture doesn't come in very well, but you are correct in the 66 means your PPK was manufactured in 1966.
 

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All,
I need some help with identifying the marks on a PPK I just inherited and understanding with they mean. Pics are included. Starting with the slide, I know the gun was manufactured in 1966 in Ulm, West Germany by the "66" and the symbol that looks like one side of a deer's antler. The manufacture in 1966 is supported by another resource I found in the forums that provided the relationship between the serial number and year of manufacture. The symbol to the right of the deer antler also appears on the receiver at the end of the serial number and on the other side of the gun. Elsewhere in these forums I found something that says it means "definitive nitro proof for all guns". What does that mean? Also, on another sight, I saw some differentiation on the safety and how far it rotates. This one appears to rotate 90 degrees counterclockwise. It seems to be rather standard on Walther handguns and I wonder if there are some that are different.

I appreciate any information. Thank You!

View attachment 108408 View attachment 108409
Welcome from Northern Indiana enjoy the conversation.
 
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