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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello, I like fire arms. I look forward to looking at the threads and info.

I am here more specifically because my girlfriends father has a P-38 that he is interested to learn more about and the worth for possible future sale. Also any other cool info in addition. So here I am.
From what I can tell its a 1944 P-38 from during WW2. Not post? It has matching slide and frame serials. It has a magazine not pictured.
He got it from a friend of his cousin that had it during the Korean War. Any help would be appreciated. It is in original used condition. I see these go for $500-1000 generally. I see ones in other locations going for Thousands? What makes those special, condition, papers, accessories? I don't think there is anymore but I will find out. Thank you.
 

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Welcome to the Forums scooby.
Your research is correct. The weapon appears to have been built at the Walther factory (the AC) in 1944 (44) in October (j) early in the run (837). It has the proper acceptance stamps on the slide and frame. (You want to check that the barrel and locking block match as well.)

The bakelite grips appear to be in good condition (hard to tell in those images) and again it is hard to assess the pitting. I can't tell if that is from rust or was a poorly finished weapon that was accepted with those pits (I'd rather doubt this). It does not appear to be reblued.

I wouldn't shoot it until it has been checked by a smith who understands these weapons. Still it is a nice example of a late ZM P.38 from the Walther factory and as such could fetch between $500 and $600.

As to the rare collectable P. 38s well spend some time reading about the variations. It can take years to become educated on that and believe me it is lots of fun.

I started my interest because my father acquired one on D+3 at the start of his "Walking Tour of Europe". He hated his 45 and his sergeant was tasked with keeping him in 9mm...apparently not to hard to do. I have pictures of him with that on his belt instead of the 45. Anyway I grew up knowing the P.38 and that one remains in the family.
 
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Discussion Starter #3
Olsoul, Thank you for the response and info. I will field strip it and take some more better pictures. I think the pits are from past use. They are not currently rusty or anything. It is cool to think that this gun has been around so long and been all over the world. I will definitely not fire until inspected. Thank you
 

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High $ values are driven by scarcity and condition. Because your gun is not pristine or hard to find you won't be retiring if you sell it. IMO it's greatest value is as a family heirloom regularly taken to the shooting range.
 
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