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Discussion Starter #1
have no children or grandchildren in our home....we usually visit our grandchildren, as parents work, and don't have time much to come down here to the coast. Son thinks I need gun safe....I have 7 pistols...all unloaded except defense gun by bed, I can put all guns on top shelf of our closet which I have to stand on stool to reach when they are here (twice a yr.) Also, we can lock our bedroom - so why a gun safe?


If you think I do need safe....any ideas of what and where to get? thanks
 

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Get a gun safe....If you are broken into you'll be pleased. Most common thieves will not take the time to try to crack a gun safe.

If the grandkids do come to visit I guarantee that they will know where they are stored within 10 minutes and a closet isn't a place you want those weapons stored anyway...
 
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Many moons ago when I was looking for a safe, I started chatting with another customer and he gave me this sage advice. Decide what size safe you need for your guns, then buy a safe one or two sizes bigger.


He was right. It wasn't long before my guns were sharing space with my camera, jewelery, coins, income tax returns, and other important papers.

Also pay attention to the fire rating on the safes you are looking at. Especially if you are going to store important papers in the safe.

Some home owner's insurances offer a discount if your valuables are in a safe.

And remember, you might be a red neck if your gun safe is bigger than your refrigerator. ;)

Pudge


The post editor is acting up and adding extra lines between sentences. Wierd.
 

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Buy a safe. I bought a smallish Liberty safe (probably bigger than you want) and store rifles and handguns, ammo, equipment plus a asbestos pocket to protect jewelry and documents so we don’t need a bank vault any longer. As far as why, those kids will find your guns quicker than you can imagine and burglars also know where to look.

As far as what kind, so far I’m experimenting on various types. My main safe above is in the closet, 5’ tall aboutst, and bolted to the floor. My bedside is still to be determined. So far I’m not having much luck with biometric and when all said and done will probably stick with a key pad for quick entry.
 

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Fireams should be locked up in order to take reasonable precautions against unauthorized access. That said, the only material difference between a gun locker/cabinet and a gun safe tends to be … perception.

Realistically, someone with a 4" or 7" angle grinder and a cut-off wheel ($20-30 dollars, total) who gets into your home … can then get into either a gun safe or a gun locker/cabinet in about 15 mins … in a manner that is quiet enough that your neighbors will have no idea it is happening.


Here's a video on the subject:


The other thing gun safes sell you on is: fire resistance. However, if the fire is hot enough or the safe remains in it long enough … the safe will flex/fail, deforming it around the door and letting heat, water, etc. into the safe. The result could look like:



I personally have gun and ammo lockers … and I insure my firearms such that if they are lost in a fire, they will be replaced.
 

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There used to be a show on TV a few years ago that was literally all about these guys breaking into houses, to show the extent of what thieves do inside the home. Bedroom closets and dresser drawers were literally one of the very first places that they would hit.
It seems natural, because small kids do the exact same thing when they are bored and start searching around an unfamiliar house.
So if nothing else, I really do recommend finding a better place to store your firearms, and ammunition.

As has already been mentioned, a fire resistant safe is never a bad thing to have in the house. Not necessarily just for firearms. As stated, keeping important documents locked away, where you know where they are, when you need them, is a big help. Not only that, some of those types of documents include a lot of personal information on them. Some thieves look for that kind of stuff as well. They break into your house, tear the place up, steal your valuables, AND THEN commit identity theft on you to top it all off!
On that note, always SHRED anything that can be used like that, that you're not going to keep. Those types of thieves will also steal your trash bags out of your trash cans, so they can look for that kinds of stuff later. Which, heaven forbid if you ever get broken into, and your trash is gone, start calling your banks and credit card companies. Which a person should do anyway after a break in, but yeah.
Now this may seem odd, but don't ever leave a safe in the garage. One case, the thieves literally wrapped a chain on it and drug it off for several blocks before loading it into the van.

As for recommendations... there's so many, and I'm really out of the loop on that subject. My first thought tho, is to talk to one of your insurance company reps. They might be able to give you a lead on somebody good to talk to about that kind of thing. County sheriff might also be a good source for a lead. They have to hire safe crackers to open up anything like that, that gets confiscated by the county.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Insuring your firearms

Fireams should be locked up in order to take reasonable precautions against unauthorized access. That said, the only material difference between a gun locker/cabinet and a gun safe tends to be … perception.

Realistically, someone with a 4" or 7" angle grinder and a cut-off wheel ($20-30 dollars, total) who gets into your home … can then get into either a gun safe or a gun locker/cabinet in about 15 mins … in a manner that is quiet enough that your neighbors will have no idea it is happening.


Here's a video on the subject:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l-9vWa-C44I


The other thing gun safes sell you on is: fire resistance. However, if the fire is hot enough or the safe remains in it long enough … the safe will flex/fail, deforming it around the door and letting heat, water, etc. into the safe. The result could look like:



I personally have gun and ammo lockers … and I insure my firearms such that if they are lost in a fire, they will be replaced.

How do you insure your firearms...perhaps a rider on your homeowners policy? thanks
 
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