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$590? No thanks...I can get nice vintage version for that and

not be a guinea pig for Umarex - YMMV ;)
Your choice is your choice but you think 590 is too much to pay for a brand new stainless steel gun? The slide is made in Germany by the way.

Did you expect Walther to sell these things for the price of an LCP?

Just curious what you think a fair price would be?
 

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The PPK has had the reputation of being beautiful and built like a Swiss watch but also of being picky feeders, having a really tough DA first shot and of being prone to biting the hands that shoot it.

IF and I emphasize IF the new gun is improved in those areas, why the hostility?

If the gun brings a new generation of shooters into the PP fold, how is that a bad thing?

Some of that new generation will eventually go on to buy or at least appreciate the vintage pieces you favor.

I'm trying to keep and open mind on this. I don't expect the new gun to have the bluing, fit and finish or soul of the old ones but if they function well and are well made they bring something good to a market saturated with plastic, stamped metal pistols.
 

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$590?


That's halfway to a Classic NIB 99% P5!


Save your money up and buy the P5, a soft shooting Walther designed dropping lock block function, from a time when Walther (WITHOUT Umarex) was at the top of their "metal gun" game.


Yes, I'm still a P5 addict, and working thru my addiction.
Hey DUA. The single stack nines from that era are certainly nice. I had three P7s at one time. Two M8s and one of the P7Ks I thi k it was called in 380. Great guns.

It was not one of my better moves selling them when I did.
 

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$590?


That's halfway to a Classic NIB 99% P5!


Save your money up and buy the P5, a soft shooting Walther designed dropping lock block function, from a time when Walther (WITHOUT Umarex) was at the top of their "metal gun" game.


Yes, I'm still a P5 addict, and working thru my addiction.

How would you compare the P5 to the Sig P6 and HK P7?
There's no doubt that was a great era for single stack 9mm service pistols.
 

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No it wasn't. I've got some similar, boneheaded moves in my past. :)


A P7K? Wow, just wow. Didn't know they existed.
Moon
The correct name was the P7K3. If with a straight blow ack that used a buffer to cushion the final slide movement.

It was designed to be convertible between 380, 32acp and 22LR. I think of it as P7 meets HK4.

While P7 9mms would feed rocks I found the K3 to.be a little temperamental. Blasphemy I know but it's just another data point to support the straight blowbacks are not quite as reliable theory.

Even then, the calibre conversion kits were as rare as hens teeth.
 

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Jimmo, googled it up, and found some of the same reservations you noted. It sounds like a response to European restrictions on gun buying or limits.
More blasphemy; my P7 actually ran pretty well on .380s. Not that I recommend it.
Moon
Thanks Moon. There's a story there somewhere. I would have never even thought to feed my P7s .380 :) They were pretty expensive guns even then.
 

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Jimmo, googled it up, and found some of the same reservations you noted. It sounds like a response to European restrictions on gun buying or limits.
More blasphemy; my P7 actually ran pretty well on .380s. Not that I recommend it.
Moon
FWIW, at one time I had a P5C, S&W 3914NL (styled like the Ladysmith model), and a Beretta 9FS Compact Type M (single stack). The Beretta was only slightly thinner in the grip than the 92FS Compact Type L (13 round), due to the wood grip configuration. The S&W was the thinnest of the three, and had a very sweet trigger, shorter and smoother than the Walther or Beretta, and was slightly more accurate than either the Walther or Beretta. All were top quality in fit and finish, and utterly reliable. It really gets down to what you like personally. The P7 was just a little too "off" for me, mostly due to being muzzle light, or too much weight, proportionally, in the hand. The P7, however, might be the most intrinsically accurate (true fixed barrel). A friend carried a P7M13 for years on his police department, but thousands of rounds had him replacing the striker retaining plate several times, with a sometimes "difficult" HK customer service. That CAN be a factor to consider with the choice of guns.
I agree with you on the Smith 39** series guns. Excellent and underrated guns. I have a few in different configurations. The best of them is an early PC3953.

Alas, you cannot really get parts or service for those guns either any more.
 

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Not long ago you could buy two 39xx series S&W's for the price of one German PPK or P5. Come to think of it, you probably still can! Who needs spare parts when you can just toss one and pick up another?
Ha! That certainly would work!

I have a good size collection of Smith 845s, 952s and other more odd ball PC guns like a 4" 3953, a 5" 5903, ...
I used to shoot the snot out of some of them. They've gotten too valuable and too hard to fix if something breaks though.

I kind of believe the guns I shoot a lot should be easy to get parts for and fix. Any gun you put lots of rounds through will eventually need help. Therefore the old PC guns have been retired to a quiet existence in the back of the safe.
 

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Jimmo, presume the 952 is a 9mm 52, which seems like a long journey to get back where you started. :)
I've gone thru' about 3 39s, and several had sear trouble, which led to doubling. They were used, and perhaps the victims of bubbasmithing. Found a 439 NIB, and that will be a keeper.
None of my older stuff really sees too many rounds. The .380s-in-the P7 experiment was shortly after I got it, and it wasn't worth a ton of money. The thot' was that the gas system would be self-balancing, and it did work; headspaced on the extractor.
I'm always surprised at how small/heavy the P7 is.
The new Glock 48 is a poly single stack 9 that feels good in the hand.
Moon
Yes. The 952 was meant as a more modern take on the 52. Chambered in 9mm with 9 round magazines it was more versatile than the old 52. It was available with 5 or 6 inch barrels. If you like accurate 9mms, the gun is a treat.

The guns, as far as I know, were built by one guy at a time. Numbers produced were never high. The triggers could be tuned to the sub 2lb range though I think most delivered to the US market were more in the 4lb range.

The 39 itself I've never owned. It's hard to say if the sear issues are the result of overzealous gunsmithing or high round counts. I've seen both cases with Smiths and suspect the design to be susceptible though not likely to be seen with a factory or non-competition gun.

Congrats on the 439. A piece of Americana. In my opinion, all the Smith 39 descendants feel good in the hand.
 
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