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I treasured my post war, Ulm/Do PPK in 7.65; a beautiful example, having been made in 1966. However, active use of the gun eventually caused enough wear on the action to wear the hammer and sear contact to cause the hammer to fall to the DA position during firing. I had to ship it to a qualified pistolsmith at considerable expense to get it right. It always hit about 4-8" high at 25 yards, but was superbly accurate. I could not drift the rear sight,, though,as it was so tight in the dovetail that I backed off in fear of marring the gun by accident due to heavy hammer hits gone wrong. Before that, I had a 1964 PPK in .380, that bit me several times when I didn't pay attention to thumb knuckle location. Magazines got expensive for both, and I feared that the action might start slipping again, so I let my last, the 7.65, go. Keeping a gun made better than 50 years ago running on original parts is a scary and possibly expensive proposition. As much as those guns were iconic and beautiful, I had to let them go. I loved the looks, quality, and accuracy, and the 7.65 got the nod for reliability over the .380, which balked now and then. As I noted in another thread, the new one need a driftable rear sight, and should be properly sighted in to begin with. Will the fit and finish ever be as good as the old ones? I do not know. In the meantime, there are a lot of new designs offered in 9mm that are as small, smaller, lighter, and more powerful than the PPK.....even some .45's are more compact. I am now packing a P5C Walther as a CCW on occasion, and although larger than the PPK, it is certainly a gun to step up to from the PPK for any serious defense.
 

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FWIW, at one time I had a P5C, S&W 3914NL (styled like the Ladysmith model), and a Beretta 9FS Compact Type M (single stack). The Beretta was only slightly thinner in the grip than the 92FS Compact Type L (13 round), due to the wood grip configuration. The S&W was the thinnest of the three, and had a very sweet trigger, shorter and smoother than the Walther or Beretta, and was slightly more accurate than either the Walther or Beretta. All were top quality in fit and finish, and utterly reliable. It really gets down to what you like personally. The P7 was just a little too "off" for me, mostly due to being muzzle light, or too much weight, proportionally, in the hand. The P7, however, might be the most intrinsically accurate (true fixed barrel). A friend carried a P7M13 for years on his police department, but thousands of rounds had him replacing the striker retaining plate several times, with a sometimes "difficult" HK customer service. That CAN be a factor to consider with the choice of guns.
 

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Not long ago you could buy two 39xx series S&W's for the price of one German PPK or P5. Come to think of it, you probably still can! Who needs spare parts when you can just toss one and pick up another?
 
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