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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
A gentlemen posted in another Walther forum that he was contacted by an online retailer (Sportsman Outdoor Superstore) that the stainless PPK/S, that he had pre-ordered, was now available.
Their website shows “Out of Stock” (filling pre-order first naturally) for this gun and a price of approx. $590
Just an FYI.
 

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Hi, MAC and others have stated that the 2019 PPK/s has a much better DA trigger pull than previous Walthers?

I wonder if it would be better than a 1969 PP?

The only PPK/PPK/s I have right now is the PPK/s .22 and no way am I able to pull the trigger in DA mode.

Is the Itneramrs trigger just as bad?
 

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$590? No thanks...I can get a nice vintage version for that and not be a guinea pig for Umarex - YMMV ;)
 

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$590? No thanks...I can get nice vintage version for that and

not be a guinea pig for Umarex - YMMV ;)
Your choice is your choice but you think 590 is too much to pay for a brand new stainless steel gun? The slide is made in Germany by the way.

Did you expect Walther to sell these things for the price of an LCP?

Just curious what you think a fair price would be?
 

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At most any price point, I think that these pistols being “brand new” is one of the least attractive aspects :)

The $590 price may well be a steal for what it is, not a polymer striker-fired pistol. My point obviously reflects my bias toward pre-Umarex hardware (including the Ranger/IA guns, but not S&W, with this bias).
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
$590 seems okay to me.
I get it’s pricey, and I could get a “better” .380 for the money, but then it’s not a PPK/S.
FWIW I got the .22 version and love the look and feel of the thing.
Looking forward to them really being out there and seeing people’s impressions.
So far they seem positive from the “inside crowd” but I’ll be interested in what Joe Public thinks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
People with no memory of the real thing are the target market. They are buying the name and the look.

M
You are certainly correct on both counts.
And I’ll take one please. Only question left is stainless or black for me.
 

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The PPK has had the reputation of being beautiful and built like a Swiss watch but also of being picky feeders, having a really tough DA first shot and of being prone to biting the hands that shoot it.

IF and I emphasize IF the new gun is improved in those areas, why the hostility?

If the gun brings a new generation of shooters into the PP fold, how is that a bad thing?

Some of that new generation will eventually go on to buy or at least appreciate the vintage pieces you favor.

I'm trying to keep and open mind on this. I don't expect the new gun to have the bluing, fit and finish or soul of the old ones but if they function well and are well made they bring something good to a market saturated with plastic, stamped metal pistols.
 

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$590?


That's halfway to a Classic NIB 99% P5!


Save your money up and buy the P5, a soft shooting Walther designed dropping lock block function, from a time when Walther (WITHOUT Umarex) was at the top of their "metal gun" game.


Yes, I'm still a P5 addict, and working thru my addiction.
 

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$590?


That's halfway to a Classic NIB 99% P5!


Save your money up and buy the P5, a soft shooting Walther designed dropping lock block function, from a time when Walther (WITHOUT Umarex) was at the top of their "metal gun" game.


Yes, I'm still a P5 addict, and working thru my addiction.
Hey DUA. The single stack nines from that era are certainly nice. I had three P7s at one time. Two M8s and one of the P7Ks I thi k it was called in 380. Great guns.

It was not one of my better moves selling them when I did.
 

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Hello, my name is DUA, and I am an addict ;)

After the P5Lang acquisition, the addiction is MUCH stronger then my will.


I've purchased a few H&K P7s, and a POF AR-10 P308 SPR, but handling a P5 still brings the biggest grin to my face.When it's the Lang, the grin lasts for a while.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Disregard. Google was my friend.
 

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The PPK has had the reputation of being beautiful and built like a Swiss watch but also of being picky feeders, having a really tough DA first shot and of being prone to biting the hands that shoot it.

IF and I emphasize IF the new gun is improved in those areas, why the hostility?

If the gun brings a new generation of shooters into the PP fold, how is that a bad thing?

Some of that new generation will eventually go on to buy or at least appreciate the vintage pieces you favor.

I'm trying to keep and open mind on this. I don't expect the new gun to have the bluing, fit and finish or soul of the old ones but if they function well and are well made they bring something good to a market saturated with plastic, stamped metal pistols.
I have no idea what makes folks so needlessly unfriendly, hostile, and unabashedly elitist when it comes to the reproduction of firearms. Unfortunately, its very common behavior in spite of how unflattering it obviously is, so it's best just to ignore it, go on liking what YOU like, and not allowing the biased opinions of others dissuade you from doing so.

When I first signed up on this forum I did so seeking information from fans in regards to this new production (Yes, it has been in the works that long!) as well as the most recently produced models by Smith & Wesson and was basically told in so many words to stay away.
However, being unsatisfied by the answers (or lack thereof) regarding the exact issues that made S&W models to be avoided after it had been recalled with all relevant issues being corrected, I ultimately decided to get a S&W model for myself in 2016 when one showed up LNiB at my LGS, which I'm glad that I did because it turned out great. Had I listened, then I probably either wouldn't own a PPK at all right now, or if I did then it would probably be a vintage model which I would feel obligated to keep in pristine condition rather than carry or shoot often, which I never actually wanted to begin with.
In addition, I probably wouldn't be interested in the new production anymore either since the same folks who told me not to get a Smith & Wesson model have also been insisting that this new production would be just as bad if not worse than the S&W models ever since, make of that what you will.

It's still relatively early in the production of the new PPK(/S) and so far most of the folks who have actually reviewed them were sent examples by Walther for T&E which may not necessarily reflect the overall quality of the finished product.
Thankfully, it's an old design which Walther has had plenty of time to tinker with in order to insure reliability, so in all likelihood the new PPK(/S) is most likely going to be just fine, and even on the off chance that they aren't, they're backed by a lifetime warranty.

Either way, time will tell for certain whether or not the new production lives up to the reputation of classic models, just make sure that your source of information is unbiased, free of elitism, and lacks any personal stake or means to benefit from the potential commercial failure of them before you go placing too much stock in what they say. ;)
 

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I treasured my post war, Ulm/Do PPK in 7.65; a beautiful example, having been made in 1966. However, active use of the gun eventually caused enough wear on the action to wear the hammer and sear contact to cause the hammer to fall to the DA position during firing. I had to ship it to a qualified pistolsmith at considerable expense to get it right. It always hit about 4-8" high at 25 yards, but was superbly accurate. I could not drift the rear sight,, though,as it was so tight in the dovetail that I backed off in fear of marring the gun by accident due to heavy hammer hits gone wrong. Before that, I had a 1964 PPK in .380, that bit me several times when I didn't pay attention to thumb knuckle location. Magazines got expensive for both, and I feared that the action might start slipping again, so I let my last, the 7.65, go. Keeping a gun made better than 50 years ago running on original parts is a scary and possibly expensive proposition. As much as those guns were iconic and beautiful, I had to let them go. I loved the looks, quality, and accuracy, and the 7.65 got the nod for reliability over the .380, which balked now and then. As I noted in another thread, the new one need a driftable rear sight, and should be properly sighted in to begin with. Will the fit and finish ever be as good as the old ones? I do not know. In the meantime, there are a lot of new designs offered in 9mm that are as small, smaller, lighter, and more powerful than the PPK.....even some .45's are more compact. I am now packing a P5C Walther as a CCW on occasion, and although larger than the PPK, it is certainly a gun to step up to from the PPK for any serious defense.
 

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The only PPK/PPK/s I have right now is the PPK/s .22 and no way am I able to pull the trigger in DA mode.

Is the Itneramrs trigger just as bad?
All of my PP and PPK's have a very heavy DA trigger. The Interarms PPK .380 is the worst though.
 

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$590?


That's halfway to a Classic NIB 99% P5!


Save your money up and buy the P5, a soft shooting Walther designed dropping lock block function, from a time when Walther (WITHOUT Umarex) was at the top of their "metal gun" game.


Yes, I'm still a P5 addict, and working thru my addiction.

How would you compare the P5 to the Sig P6 and HK P7?
There's no doubt that was a great era for single stack 9mm service pistols.
 

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Point taken, Austin. If you're hellbent and determined to carry a PPK, then a new one makes perfect sense. There are more powerful, more reliable, alternatives that are no bigger, and less unpleasant to shoot, which make some of us doubtful of the whole exercise.
But I hope you get your gun, it meets your expectations, and that it serves you well.
Moon
 
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Hey DUA. The single stack nines from that era are certainly nice. I had three P7s at one time. Two M8s and one of the P7Ks I thi k it was called in 380. Great guns.

It was not one of my better moves selling them when I did.

No it wasn't. I've got some similar, boneheaded moves in my past. :)


A P7K? Wow, just wow. Didn't know they existed.
Moon
 
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