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I recently acquired a PPK in a 22LR which I dated to be around 1932. The heel on both of the mags are a green color. In my research I can't find anything to tell me if these are original or after market. Has anyone seen these green colored mags??? Thanks, John
 

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You better get that stuff off your wife's table cloth before you find out what causes black and blue and green. :eek::) Never seen any like them. Love those .22 cal PPK's. 1917
 

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Very nice find! I believe the green finger extensions are found on the early Reichsbank training guns. The training guns would have been in .22cal.
 

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Thanks for setting me on the right track. After reading this article and watching his short video, it seems to confirm your theory that this was indeed a bank gun. Thanks

https://www.legacy-collectibles.com/blog/post/reichsbank-walther-ppk-rfv-pistols-from-ww2

Was never a theory. If not on this forum, the green finger extension PPK magazines have been discussed on other forums over the past many years and definitely associated with Reichsbank training .22 PPKs. The association is by serial numbers found on the magazine and the PPK both on the frame and the slide. The frame and slide numbering has been identified by Reichsbank manual as the marking of Reichsbank weapons. The green finger extensions were never mentioned in the Reichsbank manual in the mention of .22 training guns.
 

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Green Finger Extension Reichsbank .22 Magazines

Unfortunately, the image that you posted on this thread was not as good to view as the one you posted later inquiring about the ejection problem. But since this thread addressed the color of the finger extension, I thought I would add my research and thoughts to this thread.

As I explained on other forums on which you posted you wonderful Reichsbank .22 lfb Walther PPK, according to the Reichsbank manual .22 PPKs were not issued to all Reichsbank facilities for training. While both 7,65mm and .22 lfb Walthers were used for training, only the .22 lfb guns were specifically designated as Übungswaffen (training weapons). So I think those facilities issued the guns would know their training equipment.

But the manual noted these pistols required a specific type of .22 ammunition specifically made for self-loading firearms. The boxes of this .22 ammunition featured a green label around the side of the box as shown in the accompanying image. It is no accident that the finger extensions of these .22 Reichsbank PPKs are the same color. And according to a well known Walther researcher, these green finger extensions have only been found on Reichsbank .22 PPKs and PPs.
 

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I did a comparison study of the loads then and now using info from Bock’s book. Can’t remember on what forum I posted the info. But the main change from their standard long rifle loads was a stronger nickel finish case, lube and a heavier load compared to their standard .22s. The standard rounds had softer copper cases and lighter loads and were not lubed. The special cartridges were also available in .22 short for such pistols as the Olympic Schnellfeuer The problem with the .22 lr cartridges also affected conversion kits like the Erma S.E.L. f. P08 (the toggle conversion system for the Luger). Manuals for this kit like the Fischer police weapons manual stated the special cartridges must be used or the toggle would have to be manually cycled and smokestacks might occur.
 
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Sounds like they were making a round with a little more blowback energy for reliable cycling. I suppose at one time there was not the wide variety of .22 ammo we now enjoy. 1917
 

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Sounds like they were making a round with a little more blowback energy for reliable cycling. I suppose at one time there was not the wide variety of .22 ammo we now enjoy. 1917

And a casing that would function in a semi-auto extractor. Plus lubrication.
 

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Perhaps this explains the confusion about how many rounds will run in the .22 magazine.
Moon
 

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I would assume that if these were training pistols for otherwise very reliable .32 pistols. Walther then wanted a .22 round that provided very reliably function in these pistols. Reliable feeding/extraction/ejection (nose shape and lube), stronger case that perhaps did not expand much, heavier round for a bit more recoil/blowback for reliable cycling...basically a round that functioned very well in the pistol while training. Perhaps the rounds had a bit more powder, different powder, special primer. A higher quality training round perhaps. I don't go back that far....close to it...but a couple of years shy of '32. 1917
 

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We had another thread here, discussing how many rounds would run reliably in the PP .22 magazine. Without getting into that discussion based on Walther literature, it's apparent enough that the magazine body will hold ten rounds. Whether it will reliably cycle with a ten round load is another question.
I was speculating that the 'green box' ammo might have allowed the guns to run reliably from a full magazine, something that isn't always true with other .22 ammo.
Moon
 

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I would assume that if these were training pistols for otherwise very reliable .32 pistols. Walther then wanted a .22 round that provided very reliably function in these pistols. Reliable feeding/extraction/ejection (nose shape and lube), stronger case that perhaps did not expand much, heavier round for a bit more recoil/blowback for reliable cycling...basically a round that functioned very well in the pistol while training. Perhaps the rounds had a bit more powder, different powder, special primer. A higher quality training round perhaps. I don't go back that far....close to it...but a couple of years shy of '32. 1917
We had another thread here, discussing how many rounds would run reliably in the PP .22 magazine. Without getting into that discussion based on Walther literature, it's apparent enough that the magazine body will hold ten rounds. Whether it will reliably cycle with a ten round load is another question.
I was speculating that the 'green box' ammo might have allowed the guns to run reliably from a full magazine, something that isn't always true with other .22 ammo.
Moon
As I wrote above, the cartridges were designed by the industry to function more reliably in ALL self loading weapons, not only pistols. Walther was producing a fine semi-auto .22 lf sporting rifle from the 1920s. Other companies were producing .22 pistols. Finding full boxes of this special ammo in the US proved to be a great challenge. I was only able to find them in Europe and my friend of course had to empty it to send it to me. I wanted the box for my .22 Walther Olympia Schnellfeuer shooter cases I have. Here are two photos of the special RWS .22 kurz ammo that was left in Europe with my friend. So I have boxes for both the special .22 lfb and .22 kurz.

As you can see, the nickle case is evident but the bullet shape would seem the same. Lube is not evident after 80 years. Walther in their advertisements recommended this style of ammo in all their semi-auto firearms. So it seems logical that the Reichsbank ordered green finger extensions to insure that all employees training with the .22 PPs or PPKs would use the proper ammo.
 

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Wow! That's some premium 80 year old ammo. I have a couple of boxes of 60+year U.S. .22 lr that shows similar quality production. Today's factories are producing good factory ammo by the millions, or billions, but not as pretty as some of the older stock. Some of the new ammo is as reliable as in the past, but could you imagine the cost if they made custom ammo, like above, for particular firearms.

Duncan
 

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Poloberst, thanks.
Is it just the picture, or is that round dimensionally different than an ordinary .22lr?
Held a MiniMag next to it...:confused: The CCI looks both slimmer and longer.
Moon
 
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