Walther Forums banner

21 - 40 of 40 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
592 Posts
I just found the 1940 verbiage to be interesting given the 1911 had been in service during WWI and this was pistol maintenance guidance to our soldiers on the eve of our entry into WWII.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
329 Posts
Ok, I think we are talking about the same thing when it comes to oil and grease on the M1 and M14. Lubriplate 130A has a viscosity of 150. That is equivalent to SAE 30 motor oil. That is about the same as the oil I was issued for the M1 and M14. We did not get it in tubes labeled Lubriplate. We got it in plastic bottles that fit in the but stock well. We referred to it as oil. Apparently it was oil with calcium added to it as a thickener which technically made it a grease (just read that over 50 years after using it). So I stand corrected. We used grease that we all thought was oil. And Yes, none of us read the manual. Trainers taught s and we used their nomenclature. So I still think I oiled my rifles. Now I know that I actually dd oil my M16. I also oiled my M1911. No calcium in those lubricants. Are, I am outa here. Semper Fi
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
246 Posts
Ok, I think we are talking about the same thing when it comes to oil and grease on the M1 and M14. Lubriplate 130A has a viscosity of 150. That is equivalent to SAE 30 motor oil. That is about the same as the oil I was issued for the M1 and M14. We did not get it in tubes labeled Lubriplate. We got it in plastic bottles that fit in the but stock well. We referred to it as oil. Apparently it was oil with calcium added to it as a thickener which technically made it a grease (just read that over 50 years after using it). So I stand corrected. We used grease that we all thought was oil. And Yes, none of us read the manual. Trainers taught s and we used their nomenclature. So I still think I oiled my rifles. Now I know that I actually dd oil my M16. I also oiled my M1911. No calcium in those lubricants. Are, I am outa here. Semper Fi
No disrespect intended with my posts bull - just curious why we didn't agree and wanted to clarify.

Thank you for your service.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
329 Posts
No disrespect intended with my posts bull - just curious why we didn't agree and wanted to clarify.

Thank you for your service.
Thank you for your service.[/QUOTE]

No disrespect felt, I have say that it was my own lack of probing and easy use of a terms that I had defined in my mind in a way that was not consistent with the technicalities. That stemmed from my. training when we were schooled on weapon maintenance. Trainers used the verbs oiling not greasing and oil not grease. The material we used to lubricate was the consistency of light motor oil. I had no idea that what made it grease was the additions of calcium to thicken the oil. It was in checking as part of this discussion that I read the technicalities of grease vs. oil in terms of viscosity.

I checked that because of the M14 manual instructions posted. I never saw the manual. All our instructions were hand on, and the word grease never ws used . You might say that what we used on the M1 and M14 had the viscosity of light motor oil so I considered it oil, but all that time it was grease. I learned something new. That is good for me. Sorry if it was pain for others.

Finally, let's recall that this thread was originally input "Do you grease the sllides?" I see that as pistoatel question, and I have no knowledge of the military or manufacturers recommending anything but oiling. And I do not seek to reopen a debate.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
828 Posts
1911 cleaning with soap and water. Before 1952 military .45 ACP ammo used corrosive primer. So water soluble cleaning method was used.
Today I would use balistol diluted in water for mil surp if I shot some corrosive primer ammo.

Follow up with non diluted ballistol.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
592 Posts
My dad enlisted in the Army 14 days after getting off a refugee ship in New York harbor in 1948. He told me they dipped their M-1 rifles, likely in storage since the end of the war, in hot water to remove the cosmoline.

PS: When he found a hole in his shirt he asked the supply sergeant for a sewing kit. When the supply asked why, my dad showed him the hole. The supply sergeant snatched the shirt out on my dad's hands and threw it in a trash can. He then issued my dad a new shirt.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
592 Posts
I've just started using EWG grease again on my PPK rails and slide/frame contact points. I use a precision "Hoppe's 9 oiler" to apply a tiny drop to other moving parts on the pistol. I use a Glock bore bush with ballistol to clean the bore.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
246 Posts
I like Super Lube synthetic grease. It's light-weight and works well in cold temps as we tend to shoot year-round, sometimes in the single digits. Never had any issues related to slow cycling.

As with most grease, the key is not to use too much. I apply it sparingly with an Acid Brush that's typically used for plumbing and electrical flux. You just need a thin coating because it doesn't dissipate.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,914 Posts
SuperLube grease is excellent and can be purchased in large grease-gun cartridges far more economically than the small plastic tubes found on hardware store shelves. It is clear, won't stain, and "sticky" enough to adhere well.

I am also fond of Tetra-Grease for certain applications. It has just the right consistency for springs in blind holes.

I quit using Lubriplate and white lithium grease --such as commonly used for electrical connections and car door latches after finding that, after application to small parts in guns like sears and springs, it hardened after a year or so and crumbled off. In places where it was removed, it left bright steel discolored.

M
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
I tracked down a quart of LSA. Be sure to shake before use!!!!

Looks like Amazon has some.
https://www.amazon.com/Genuine-Army-Military-Lubricant-Protectant/dp/B07DH4F5K4

I put a few drops on any metal to metal wear spots. I use a squeeze bottle with a stainless needle tip. https://www.ebay.com/itm/1-pc-Refillable-Precision-Bottle-Oiler-1-2-oz-NO-OIL-Needle-Tip-Guns-etc/322463990940?ssPageName=STRK:MEBIDX:IT&_trksid=p2060353.m1438.l2649

Clean up with Hoppe's.

For the bore and other non-wearing surfaces I use a light coat of synthetic ATF fluid....you ever take apart an auto trans?

My 2 cents.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
618 Posts
I’ve gone to using a very lite amount of oil. I put some oil on a q-tip and wipe every surface to surface contact point. You just need to make things slippery.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
113 Posts
For almost all real conditions of use, possibly except for conservation, a "dry" lubricants is ideally suited.

In fact, if there is a desire to save money, engine synthetic all-weather oils with a neutral reaction are quite consistent.
You can lubricate as You like. Simply, after lubrication, wrap the gun in a piece of cloth and put it for a while (at night) in a warm place.
This is done so that excess oil flows out and does not stain clothes.

PS If "dry" lubrication is not available, an ersatz can be made by mixing WD40 (or similar) with powder graphite or, at worst, gas soot.
 
21 - 40 of 40 Posts
Top