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Discussion Starter #1
Finally got around to installing and checking out Glock striker springs in my MR9 Eagle and P99c AS. I had replaced my gen 4 G19 and G17 striker springs with some lighter ones about a year back. Since I had the original Glock springs lying around, I decided to install the G19 spring in the P99c AS and the G17 spring in the MR9. It didn't matter which went where as both springs are the same, and the strikers between the MR9 and P99c AS are identical. I took both pistols to the range today to check them out and - WOW - what a difference. The lighter Glock springs really improved the DA of the "AS" trigger system in both pistols. The SA felt pretty much the same - as it was already fantastic. Anyway, in DA the pull through to the break is smooth, clean, and doesn't stack. You can just pull through straight to the break - and it actually surprised me the first few times I shot both pistols. I'm not sure if the lighter springs would have issues with cheaper ammo primers, but it functioned 100% of the time using 115gr Federal FMJ (bought at Walmart).
Just wanted to pass this along in case you've been thinking about doing the same.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks

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You bet. I did notice this on that link:

"Firing Pin Spring - fits all models (end with the most coils goes toward the spring cups)."

Both of my pistols ran fine, but I'm not sure if I placed the springs correctly when installing. Guess I'll have to take a look to be sure.
 

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I remember previous discussions on this forum where people who installed Glock striker springs in their P99/PPQ pistols, had issues with light primer strikes.

Walther installed a striker spring of a certain weight in the PPQ. The striker spring on a SAO pistol like the PPQ has very little impact on the trigger pull, but Walther chose that weight. I'd assume that this would probably be a good baseline as far as what the optimal spring rate would be for reliability, being that Walther would have no reason other than reliability to put that weight of striker spring in the PPQ.

I'd advise against this on a defensive pistol. How many people have tested these springs in the cold? How about when the pistol was dirty? How about when the pistol was dry? How about when the spring has had a few thousand rounds through it? How about in wet conditions? How about with all the different types of ammunition with all the different types of primers in all of the above conditions?

Walther has done these tests. The design has proven to be reliable, with the stock springs. Be careful when trying to redesign firearms on your own, and I'm saying this leaving off possible safety issues being that it has been proven that the striker can and will fall on cocked 99-series pistols with a hard enough impact on the back of the pistol. Lighter striker springs mean that it would take a lighter impact, and I'm sure someone will come along shortly on this thread and mention how much better their trigger pull is with a lighter firing pin block spring as well.
 

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I have a full size P99 that is now just sitting in my safe since buying a compact.
I don't mind trying it out and running the snot out of it at the range to see if it's a viable replacement. If not just put the old spring back.

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
I remember previous discussions on this forum where people who installed Glock striker springs in their P99/PPQ pistols, had issues with light primer strikes.

Walther installed a striker spring of a certain weight in the PPQ. The striker spring on a SAO pistol like the PPQ has very little impact on the trigger pull, but Walther chose that weight. I'd assume that this would probably be a good baseline as far as what the optimal spring rate would be for reliability, being that Walther would have no reason other than reliability to put that weight of striker spring in the PPQ.

I'd advise against this on a defensive pistol. How many people have tested these springs in the cold? How about when the pistol was dirty? How about when the pistol was dry? How about when the spring has had a few thousand rounds through it? How about in wet conditions? How about with all the different types of ammunition with all the different types of primers in all of the above conditions?

Walther has done these tests. The design has proven to be reliable, with the stock springs. Be careful when trying to redesign firearms on your own, and I'm saying this leaving off possible safety issues being that it has been proven that the striker can and will fall on cocked 99-series pistols with a hard enough impact on the back of the pistol. Lighter striker springs mean that it would take a lighter impact, and I'm sure someone will come along shortly on this thread and mention how much better their trigger pull is with a lighter firing pin block spring as well.
All very good points. Both the P99c AS and MR9 are range pistols for me. My biggest concern for using the lighter Glock striker spring would be light primer strikes. As such, it's definitely something to consider before modifying your pistol.
Having said that, this modification is relatively easy to reverse.

Edit: You got me curious about the drop safe issue. I just tested both the P99c AS and MR9 with cocked strikers and pre-staged trigger (out of the AS mode) by hitting the back of the slide with my hand and dropping them a couple of times from chest height. While certainly not a comprehensive scientific test, the striker didn't release. Not saying it couldn't happen, but I think it would take a rather extreme amount of force (like smacking the back of the pistol with a hammer enough to actually damage it). So much so that I'm thinking the Glock spring and OEM striker spring would probably need nearly the same amount of force to release them.
 

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I remember previous discussions on this forum where people who installed Glock striker springs in their P99/PPQ pistols, had issues with light primer strikes.

I only remember reading about light primer strikes with glock springs in the '99QA versions. Not saying there weren't posts/threads about the AS, I probably never read them as I wasn't interested in changing the trigger feel of my P99cAS.

As for the PPQ, I wasn't aware that changing the striker spring would have much if any affect on the trigger pull... ;)

Now, the trigger return spring...maybe...
 

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I only remember reading about light primer strikes with glock springs in the '99QA versions. Not saying there weren't posts/threads about the AS, I probably never read them as I wasn't interested in changing the trigger feel of my P99cAS.
I've read of a few reports of this here on this forum just within the past year from people who wanted to lower the weight of the DA trigger pull. I don't want to take too much time searching for the threads, but here's one that I found pretty quickly:

https://www.waltherforums.com/forum/p99/110914-few-comments-about-my-new-p99-4.html

1stnamebassist didn't have issues with his pistol until a lighter Glock striker spring was installed, and there have been plenty of reports of this before. People have been testing with Glock striker springs in these pistols on this forum for over a decade already, and many people have had issues going with too light of a spring in the past.

I've also noticed that most people who claim to have tested the pistols with the new springs don't do so properly, in my opinion.

Keep in mind that most people don't know that on a DA/SA pistol, the DA trigger pull does not cock the striker as far to the rear as a SA trigger pull when releasing the hammer/striker, which results in a lighter strike on the DA trigger pull, regardless of what weight spring is used. So, how many DA trigger pulls have people tested on these pistols that supposedly have "X" amount of "flawless" rounds through them since the spring change? This information is useless unless we know how many of those rounds were fired with the DA trigger pull. I often see people at the range with DA/SA pistols who never use the DA trigger pull, and only use the SA trigger, which impacts the primer with more force.

As for the PPQ, I wasn't aware that changing the striker spring would have much if any affect on the trigger pull...
Which was exactly my point.

It has little to no effect on the trigger pull, but Walther put that weight spring in there.

Why?

The only logical reason I can think of would be that it is the optimal weight striker spring in regards to reliability. Are you sure you want to go lower? I'd suggest that you don't, which is why I made my last post earlier, but if you suggest that others do, I'd very much appreciate it if you stated exactly how many DA trigger pulls you've made on live ammunition after the swap, and in what conditions you tested the pistol, and with what ammunition was in the chamber when you tested this new spring. If someone doesn't provide that information, I'd suggest you take their reports of "flawless" function with a grain of salt, and I'd suggest using caution when buying used pistols from anyone who is or who has ever read this forum and thought they could redesign these pistols for the better with absolutely no side effects.


Edit: You got me curious about the drop safe issue. I just tested both the P99c AS and MR9 with cocked strikers and pre-staged trigger (out of the AS mode) by hitting the back of the slide with my hand and dropping them a couple of times from chest height. While certainly not a comprehensive scientific test, the striker didn't release. Not saying it couldn't happen, but I think it would take a rather extreme amount of force (like smacking the back of the pistol with a hammer enough to actually damage it). So much so that I'm thinking the Glock spring and OEM striker spring would probably need nearly the same amount of force to release them.
https://pistol-forum.com/showthread.php?26913-Return-of-Mallet-Mallet-vs-PPQ

18" is a foot and a half. A lighter striker spring would allow the striker to drop with an even less forceful impact. Combine that with others on this forum advising that people go with lighter firing pin block springs, and I hope you can see why I make these posts. I'm curious what testing these other forum members did to determine that their lighter firing pin block spring was safe enough. I'll wait for those reports as well.


I trust the manufacturer more than I do random members on internet forums. I'd suggest you do the same, and I'd include myself in that category of individuals. At least the manufacturer is liable if they are the cause of putting out an unsafe product. Is anyone here who is cavalierly advising spring changes on pistols while doing little to no testing, going to go to court for you?
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
"Is anyone here who is cavalierly advising spring changes on pistols while doing little to no testing, going to go to court for you?"

Not sure what you mean by that statement? As I mentioned, both the P99c AS and the MR9 are range guns for me - as I use other pistols for different self defense options. In addition, I subscribe to the big boy theory - if you own it and make modifications to it, you do so at your own risk.
All's I was doing in my original post was reporting my positive results.
 

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Not sure what you mean by that statement? As I mentioned, both the P99c AS and the MR9 are range guns for me - as I use other pistols for different self defense options. In addition, I subscribe to the big boy theory - if you own it and make modifications to it, you do so at your own risk.
I was just pointing out what you just stated. Nobody who is putting out this information on how to modify pistols, using springs or whatever else, is going to go out on a limb or be held liable for anyone of you out there making these changes to your pistols. They will not be going to court for you.

All's I was doing in my original post was reporting my positive results.
I understand.

But I'll tell you that as offensive as people who make these "modification" recommendations openly on public forums find my posts, I can guarantee you that I find theirs a lot more offensive.

I'm not asking that people stop being allowed to make these recommendations openly while suffering no consequences if things go wrong. Just as long as they don't ask that I stop being allowed to reply to them.
 
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