Walther Forums banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
592 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I've been searching in vain (google and google DE) looking for information on WWII German Army pistol qualification requirements and frequency. Haven't found a thing. I'm starting to believe there was no required "table of fire." Anyone seen any info on this?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,819 Posts
The Wehrmacht Schuetzenschnur (silver cord of marksmanship) was awarded for excellent marksmanship with rifles, lMG, heavy MG, PAK, 20mm FLAK, artillery and fighting vehicles; and was worn by enlisted and non-comms, but not officers. And I don't know about any such award or required qualifications for pistols.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
592 Posts
Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Yes, the Schützenschnur was awarded for "excellent" marksmanship, but I'm trying to determine how "excellent" was defined. There must have been a defined requirement, given no administrative matter was left undefined or unregulated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
284 Posts
I’m starting to think there wasn’t one. Most people issued a pistol would be officers. I believe the only enlisted who got them were MG crew, and probably only 1 or 2 of them. Since Officers could not wear the marksmanship lanyard, my thought is there was no official course of fire, and officers would not want to be embarrassed by being exposed as poor shots...

I know the Wehrmacht required qualification on most of their “standard” infantry weapons to get the Schutzenschnar, which included Rifle, MG, and possibly SMG.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,894 Posts
I believe every member of a tank crew was also issued a pistol (i.e. not just the tank commander).
 
  • Like
Reactions: halfmoonclip

·
Registered
Joined
·
592 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I often wandered about the number of pistol rounds fired, in training, by WWII German soldiers. My unsupported assertion is that it was a very low round count by today's standard.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,474 Posts
I’m starting to think there wasn’t one. Most people issued a pistol would be officers. I believe the only enlisted who got them were MG crew, and probably only 1 or 2 of them. Since Officers could not wear the marksmanship lanyard, my thought is there was no official course of fire, and officers would not want to be embarrassed by being exposed as poor shots...

I know the Wehrmacht required qualification on most of their “standard” infantry weapons to get the Schutzenschnar, which included Rifle, MG, and possibly SMG.
Commissioned officers did not get a pistol issued. They had to purchase their own. In general, the pistols with Waffenamt Abnahme was issued to enlisted men.

The pistol qualifications have been very simple in those early days and was only for a few shots at a larger target than the civilian ISSC target. Distance was 25 meters and all shots on the target qualified the shooter, from what I recall from the conversations.

Soldiers in Panzergrenadier- and Jaegerbatallionen had to qualify with all arms they used, usually K98k, light MG, pistol and Panzerfaust. The Schuetzenschnur was usually given in different classes and the idea goes back to the brave Dutch men during the Eighty Years' War.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_Armed_Forces_Badge_of_Marksmanship
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,474 Posts
Yes, the Schützenschnur was awarded for "excellent" marksmanship, but I'm trying to determine how "excellent" was defined. There must have been a defined requirement, given no administrative matter was left undefined or unregulated.
I served in the 1970s in a PzGrenBtl and had talked about the shooting drills with my father then. Nothing much had changed in the combat units but that the RPG had been much improved.

We had to shoot pistol at 25 m. First a qualifier, five rounds precision and then five rounds at five man-sized targets. Pistol was impossible to fail! We also shot pistol and rifle with gas masks.
Rifle was several different courses of fire out to 250 and was much more demanding than pistol. Machine gun was two courses of fire at 25 meters on reduced size target, 15 rounds each with three targets engaged. One of them was under a time limit, the other without time limit.
Panzerfaust was pretty easy,too, something like hitting a large paper target at 150 in the target area of a pictured tank.

Pistol shooting has traditionally been neglected in the German military, since it had proven to have no important role in combat.

In the Bundeswehr, the Schuetzenschnur comes in gold, silver and bronze and all disciplines have to be finished in gold to get the golden Schuetzenschnur.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top