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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have just (today) noticed that the Fort Smith-manufactured PPK/S and PPK, both in 9mm kurz, are now featured on the Walther (German) website.

I have browsed the Walther website a few times in the last few days, but I hadn't noticed this before. The MSRP for each is €949 and they are marked as “New 2020”. The English language description is almost word-for-word identical to the description on the American website. These are not Ulm-manufactured pistols, as the pictures show “Fort Smith AR USA” on the right side of the slide.

It will be interesting to see how these will be received in a market where you can find post-war Manurhin and Ulmer PPKs starting from a quarter of that price, albeit mainly in 7.65mm Browning.

Balor
 

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Yes, they have only been on the website for a short time, but so far only the black versions which are described somewhat daringly as "blued". The stainless versions will certainly follow soon, as the European item numbers are already known:
- 2851962, PPK, black
- 2851989, PPK/S, black
- 2851971, PPK, stainless
- 2851997, PPK/S, stainless

Probably an apprentice has divided the original wording of the US website between the two models and shortened it considerably... almost to the point of distorting the meaning. If he had done the math, he probably wouldn't have written "over 80 years ago". It is almost 90 years now, because the original American text already has collected some dust. The web programmer did the rest for the questionable product presentation by assigning the guns to the PPQ category.

Once again, I am not particularly impressed.
 

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It will be interesting to see how these will be received in a market where you can find post-war Manurhin and Ulmer PPKs starting from a quarter of that price, albeit mainly in 7.65 para.
Cheaper, but not chambered in 7,65mm para. ;)
@Balogh: Man muss nicht alles glauben, was geschrieben wird... :)
 

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Can we swap some Ft. Smith .380 for German 7.62s, and maybe another gun to be named later?
Moon
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Cheaper, but not chambered in 7,65mm para. ;)
Sorry, my mistake. The confinement is doing odd things to my brain. Thank you for the correction.

It should, of course, have read 7.65 Browning. I have both cartridges sitting here right in front of my nose.

Balor
 

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It will be interesting to see how these will be received in a market where you can find post-war Manurhin and Ulmer PPKs starting from a quarter of that price...
What surprised me most is the comparatively low MSRP in Switzerland. Compared to the MSRP of the models then still produced by Smith & Wesson, the new models will be less expensive.

MSRP in 2013: CHF 1.200
MSRP in 2020: CHF 975 (-18.75%)

In Germany it's the opposite trend. The last MSRP was € 699 in 2013. So there is an increase in price by 35%.
 

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It will be quite interesting to eventually see how the demand for the Fort Smith copies of the PPK and PPK/S unfolds within Europe. I imagine that the under license copies will be imported in quite small quantities and will mainly only be an attractive option for one looking to fill in a spot within a Walther collection. Beyond that, it would be easy to speculate that the Fort Smith variants ultimately will be sluggish sellers in the European market.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
What surprised me most is the comparatively low MSRP in Switzerland. Compared to the MSRP of the models then still produced by Smith & Wesson, the new models will be less expensive.

MSRP in 2013: CHF 1.200
MSRP in 2020: CHF 975 (-18.75%)

In Germany it's the opposite trend. The last MSRP was € 699 in 2013. So there is an increase in price by 35%.
That is indeed unusual. Perhaps Spowag now have a direct import agreement with the manufacturer and don't have to source them indirectly through Germany.

I can't think of any other explanation.

Balor
 

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Perhaps Walther do not want to sell any PPK/(S) in Germany? They know, that most people would buy a true Walther at this price...


Btw: Swiss do not need an European proof.
 

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Perhaps Walther do not want to sell any PPK/(S) in Germany? They know, that most people would buy a true Walther at this price...


Btw: Swiss do not need an European proof.
Isn't half of the gun made in Germany? Does that make it partly a real Walther?

Maybe it's perfect for Germany's new found embrace of internationalism and diversity???
 

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@Martin: Du bringst es genau auf den Punkt. Nur wer nichts weiss, muss alles glauben. :D
This is an old problem. Part of it is perhaps translation, most of it is due to carelessness and lifting significant portions from existing pistol service manuals and plopping them in the manual for another pistol. It extends to their website advertising too. Not long ago I was reading the front page of the PPQ .22 where it was stated, "World's smoothest striker fired trigger." Lifted I expect straight from a 9mm PPQ page. The PPQ .22 has and internal hammer. I usually pass it along.

Keep us posted if you get any info on how the Ft. Smith pistol sells in Europe. I'm not expecting that it will do well. 1917
 

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It will be quite interesting to eventually see how the demand for the Fort Smith copies of the PPK and PPK/S unfolds within Europe. I imagine that the under license copies will be imported in quite small quantities and will mainly only be an attractive option for one looking to fill in a spot within a Walther collection. Beyond that, it would be easy to speculate that the Fort Smith variants ultimately will be sluggish sellers in the European market.
They are made by Walther USA and not under license.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Pfffff. Unless it says Zella St Blasii on the slide, it's not a real Walther.


:eek::D:rolleyes:
The first “real” (but cleverly disguised) Walther adding machine/calculator, made in 1924 in Zella-Mehlis - not Zella St.Blasii, nor Niederstozingen, nor Ulm......and certainly not in Fort Smith, Arkansas.

Balor

 
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