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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all,

I've had a PPS M2 for quite awhile. Its a good little pistol and I've not had much issues from it. Lately though, the trigger has really started to annoy me. It is extremely gritty and "jumpy", fancy terms here. I've put 800 rounds through it thinking it would clear up like many others do. Anyway, I disassembled the firing pin assembly to see if maybe there was build-up, but it looked pretty clean. I did notice the spring looked bunched up... almost like it was too long. Could this longer spring be rubbing the walls on the firing channel causing the perceived grit? Can anyone post a picture of they're assembly? I started disassembling the frame but could not figure out how to remove sear assembly and trigger bar to see if there was build up there. Is there videos on this? Does anyone have experience with this terrible trigger and what could be the cause? Thanks!
 

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There have been a number of threads regarding the trigger. Some go into great detail with photos. The spring and striker come out the the rear of the striker channel. There are two models of this pistol and how you remove the spring differs. I doubt your spring is any different from any others. I don't have one of these pistols but the magic in my opinion regarding a smooth trigger is all in the edges of the cylinder as it gets rotated by the trigger bar. If I had one all of the bearing edges would be polished with the edges radiused slightly. 1917
 

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There have been a number of threads regarding the trigger. Some go into great detail with photos. The spring and striker come out the the rear of the striker channel. There are two models of this pistol and how you remove the spring differs. I doubt your spring is any different from any others. I don't have one of these pistols but the magic in my opinion regarding a smooth trigger is all in the edges of the cylinder as it gets rotated by the trigger bar. If I had one all of the bearing edges would be polished with the edges radiused slightly. 1917
It's a PPS M2.....not a CCP.
 

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Hey all,

I've had a PPS M2 for quite awhile. Its a good little pistol and I've not had much issues from it. Lately though, the trigger has really started to annoy me. It is extremely gritty and "jumpy", fancy terms here. I've put 800 rounds through it thinking it would clear up like many others do. Anyway, I disassembled the firing pin assembly to see if maybe there was build-up, but it looked pretty clean. I did notice the spring looked bunched up... almost like it was too long. Could this longer spring be rubbing the walls on the firing channel causing the perceived grit? Can anyone post a picture of they're assembly? I started disassembling the frame but could not figure out how to remove sear assembly and trigger bar to see if there was build up there. Is there videos on this? Does anyone have experience with this terrible trigger and what could be the cause? Thanks!
When uncocked the PPS striker spring is relatively straight with a slight curl along its length. The grit you feel is caused by multiple areas throughout the trigger and sear block assemblies. For example, the crucifix has one "ear" on the left side that protrudes through a slot and makes contact with a cover plate throughout the back to front movement when pulling the trigger. The TRS can also rub the guide channel. The trigger bar rubs the small bar guide that is to the rear just forward of the point where the bar curves approx. 90 degrees. There are other locations wihere similar contact/rubbing takes place. Although I made several adjustments to the aforementioned points and performed some polishing I wasn't satisfied so I took it to my gunsmith. He turned the trigger to a smooth-as-butter motion!

There are several threads on this subject and I believe a few PPS owners were able to sooth the pull to a point they too claimed "butter smooth". Most have taken it to a gunsmith.

Would like to see a photo of your striker assembly to compare.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
When uncocked the PPS striker spring is relatively straight with a slight curl along its length. The grit you feel is caused by multiple areas throughout the trigger and sear block assemblies. For example, the crucifix has one "ear" on the left side that protrudes through a slot and makes contact with a cover plate throughout the back to front movement when pulling the trigger. The TRS can also rub the guide channel. The trigger bar rubs the small bar guide that is to the rear just forward of the point where the bar curves approx. 90 degrees. There are other locations wihere similar contact/rubbing takes place. Although I made several adjustments to the aforementioned points and performed some polishing I wasn't satisfied so I took it to my gunsmith. He turned the trigger to a smooth-as-butter motion!

There are several threads on this subject and I believe a few PPS owners were able to sooth the pull to a point they too claimed "butter smooth". Most have taken it to a gunsmith.

Would like to see a photo of your striker assembly to compare.
Thanks for the input. I'll post a picture later tonight showing the assembly. The spring looks too long to me and there feels like a llooot of resistance when manually pulling the spring back. Either way, I'll look more in depth tonight and see what else I can find. I'm no gunsmith but I would like to learn how to fix issues like this on my own. Do you have any advice on polishing? What sandpaper or stone you use do you use hand or tool like Dremel. Thanks
 

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Thanks for the input. I'll post a picture later tonight showing the assembly. The spring looks too long to me and there feels like a llooot of resistance when manually pulling the spring back. Either way, I'll look more in depth tonight and see what else I can find. I'm no gunsmith but I would like to learn how to fix issues like this on my own. Do you have any advice on polishing? What sandpaper or stone you use do you use hand or tool like Dremel. Thanks
The Dremel can remove too much material unless you are skilled and take your time.....that means multiple disassemblies & assemblies. Better to stay with fine sandpaper and take your time. I typically use 220 for material left on parts by the molding process. I use 400 for smoothing to a "mirror" like finish. Ultimately I suggest the PPS trigger should be left to a professional gunsmith skilled in those techniques. There are 2 names I know of who have performed work on my PPS as well as a few members of this forum.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The Dremel can remove too much material unless you are skilled and take your time.....that means multiple disassemblies & assemblies. Better to stay with fine sandpaper and take your time. I typically use 220 for material left on parts by the molding process. I use 400 for smoothing to a "mirror" like finish. Ultimately I suggest the PPS trigger should be left to a professional gunsmith skilled in those techniques. There are 2 names I know of who have performed work on my PPS as well as a few members of this forum.
Here’s the assembly
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Your striker looks exactly like mine.
well that sucks ha! I spent an hour tonight figuring out how to disassemble the m2. I did it finally! Cleaned it real good and it still feels the same. I’ll look at some other threads to see what people have done to fix it. What did the gunsmith charge you for the trigger job?
 

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well that sucks ha! I spent an hour tonight figuring out how to disassemble the m2. I did it finally! Cleaned it real good and it still feels the same. I’ll look at some other threads to see what people have done to fix it. What did the gunsmith charge you for the trigger job?
Approx. $125. I found it worth that amount. If you are unable to find an experienced gunsmith who performs trigger work like we've discussed I can contact Karl (The Trigger Guy) for you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Approx. $125. I found it worth that amount. If you are unable to find an experienced gunsmith who performs trigger work like we've discussed I can contact Karl (The Trigger Guy) for you.
I appreciate it! I’ll be in touch the next week or so. Thanks for the help!
 

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Thanks so much! I’ll look more into this. I do worry about reliability with a lighter spring. Also warranty issues. My trigger pull seems similar to yours and the spring, to me, did not seem right. Worth a shot at least
Removing coils reduces spring rate which can lead to light primer strikes or battery issues.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Removing coils reduces spring rate which can lead to light primer strikes or battery issues.
Thats what I thought, but he seems to have success after a few hundred rounds from reading that thread. Some seem to have issues with the Block spring and some don’t. I wonder if his has the peening issue. From all my research I’ve found that the m2s with the barrel peening also have a heavier trigger pull... along with a gritty or jumpy trigger.... some say 7.5-8 lb pulls. Mine has barrel peening and although I don’t have a gauge, the pull feels heavier than other striker fires I’ve tried.
 

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Thats what I thought, but he seems to have success after a few hundred rounds from reading that thread. Some seem to have issues with the Block spring and some don’t. I wonder if his has the peening issue. From all my research I’ve found that the m2s with the barrel peening also have a heavier trigger pull... along with a gritty or jumpy trigger.... some say 7.5-8 lb pulls. Mine has barrel peening and although I don’t have a gauge, the pull feels heavier than other striker fires I’ve tried.
While my first hand PPS experience is limited to the M2 I do understand the similarities and differences with the M1 version. I can tell you that my M2 never had 7-8lb pull weight. Out of the box weight was 6lb and that seems to be the more common reported weight. Also remember thaht the M1 has 2 disconnectors.....the standard heavier (H) and alternate lighter (S). Additionally, the M1 disconnectors are virtually identical to the ones used on Glocks. The M2 disconnector is fixed and IMO is an abomination. It definitely adds to some of the grit and is one of the areas that needs light polishing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Forturnately, no. I posted a picture of the barrel in this thread about 4 months ago, when my PPS was at about 1800 rounds. I'm currently up to about 2500 rounds with no peening.

Have you noticed any barrel peening on your PPS?
Yes... =/ but it is not as severe as others I have seen. I have around 800 rounds through mine. It is becoming a little more noticeable, but not as bad as Gordo's post.
 

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The Dremel can remove too much material unless you are skilled and take your time.....that means multiple disassemblies & assemblies. Better to stay with fine sandpaper and take your time. I typically use 220 for material left on parts by the molding process. I use 400 for smoothing to a "mirror" like finish. Ultimately I suggest the PPS trigger should be left to a professional gunsmith skilled in those techniques. There are 2 names I know of who have performed work on my PPS as well as a few members of this forum.
Never Dremel fire control components. Unless we are talking about cotton buffing. However, if you slip and hit the sear, disconnect, or trigger surfaces with the dremel chuck, you can permanently screw up the surfaces. Conditioning trigger components should be done with very fine abrasives and uniform polishing surfaces never sand paper. Emery cloth is the roughest abrasive I would consider. If the surfaces are extremely rough, its probably better to machine the surface geometry before polishing. A thin oil should be good for most trigger surfaces but I use aeroshell grease on the larger sear surfaces and it really smooths things out. If you can see spalling or prouding on sear surfaces they need to be machined or ground by a professional who understands tolerances and geometry of the surfaces. I would RMA the gun if possible and have the manufacturer fix it. If it looks healthy you probably need to do a component cleaning, inspect individual parts, and lube. I use aeroshell on the striker when it disconnects and on the trigger sear tip. Don't need much on the PPS. Beyond that buying a trigger spring upgrade kit, or a qualified gunsmith.
 
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