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It's been a couple of years since I've fired my P5. I've owned it since 1995. My first handgun was a P38 bought in approximately in 1973, so I'm relatively familiar with the platform. I also own an H&K P7 and compare everything to it for carry.

Lately I've been shooting my 1911 .45's and 9mm's both for recreation and in competition (steel plate). I also own a Walther Q5 steel frame match but really haven't acclimated to striker fired guns. The 1911 is the standard I seem to compare everything to. But, I've spent more time behind a 1911 than any other handgun. It's all about familiarity.

I was going through my collection and decided to spend a range day with my P5 and my P1. I'm glad I did. I fired a box through each of them.

The P5 is a splendid pistol, however it's not perfect (I know, blasphemy). Overall I think it's a fantastic carry pistol and very rewarding to shoot. It does have a wart or two though. First, there is no manual safety so really needs to be carried with the hammer down (not cocked and locked - because there is no manual safety nor is there a grip safety). Truthfully it is probably safe to carry cocked since the firing pin is not inline with the hammer but I don't like doing it. Both the P5 and the P1 suffer from the 8 round magazine capacity. However, I personally feel that 15 rounds is too heavy for carry and I doubt I'd ever need all of them.

In a self-defense situation the above is not an issue because the double action trigger action is not at all bad. In a stress situation I'm sure I'd have no problem. However, I prefer my 1911's cocked and locked.

My main criticism of the P5 is the trigger. Even with the hammer cocked, the trigger is essentially a three stage trigger. You first take up the slack (first stage), then have to get through a secondary stage while the firing pin is being raised in line with the hammer. Then the trigger meets the sear engagement and you have a relatively clean break. So, you have three stages: first stage slack take-up, firing pin raising, then the sear break. It's like a two stage trigger with a huge creep before the break.

Altogether it's not a show stopper and easily becomes second nature if you are used to the trigger. However, coming from a crisp 1911 two stage trigger it's a bit clunky.

As triggers go the P1 has a better trigger as it doesn't have that second stage to raise the firing pin. I find it to be much more natural and easy to shoot. After firing the P5 I found the P1 trigger to be much more familiar and natural to shoot. With each gun I hit 95% or so on steel plates though. Had I not been familiar with the P5 trigger that may have not been the case. The P1 has a little more sight radius but I shot both about equally well.

Despite the above, I think the P5 is a superior carry pistol. I can live with the eight round capacity. As a steel plate competitor I feel confident that I can engage as many as five assailants with eight rounds (nine if I reloading the mag after chambering the first round).

With a round in the chamber and the hammer dropped with the decocker I feel comfortable with the safety of the pistol. In fact, I feel more secure with it than my 'cocked and locked' 1911's. As I've stated, in an emergency situation I'd have no problem with the double action first shot. So, it is a safe pistol immediately deployable.

The bottom line is that, as the last iteration of the P38 the P5 is a fine pistol. I'd carry it anytime, and will.
 

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I cut my teeth on the 80’s/90’s Sig Classic P series (220,225,226,228,etc) so the P5’s DA/SA with decocker is second nature to me. I would NEVER carry the P5 cocked for liability reasons. If you ever had an accidental discharge you’d have some creative explaining to justify it. I trust my pistol more than lawyers :) Just my 2 cents.
 

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I missed the chance to come back from the FRG with a nice p5 when they were cheap - bad on me.

I think as with the P88, these are just really COOL and accurate pistols. Their triggers CAN be decent, but nothing to write home about OTB. Handled a nice p88 for the first time recently and was pretty underwhelmed by the trigger.

No DA/SA should of course be carried in SA, unless it is a CZ 75 system with a thumb safety. From what I've seen, SIG has the best consistency of triggers in these types of pistols. Maybe its why they have been successful.
 

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From what I've seen, SIG has the best consistency of triggers in these types of pistols.
I have found them to be consistent all right. Consistently heavy and gritty. I prefer the stock triggers on my P5, P88, and P88C to my P225 or P226's.
 
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