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Well I had something happen today at the range that was new for me...I had several FTF with my trusty P99...but continue reading...I was using Israeli military surplus 9mm manufactured in 1976. When I bought the stuff I asked if they had any problems with it and they said no. So I bought 3-packs of 25 rds each. Each little box was sealed so it had to be opened by pulling a string to rip the top off...I loaded up a mag and grabbed my full size 99 that I use for comp., charged the weapon and pulled the trigger. Nothing. I pulled the trigger several times and still nothing. Waiting about 30 secs, I extracted the rd and it had been dimpled but to no effect. So I tried another rd and it fired. But the 3 rd did not. I thought maybe it was my pistol since this is the one that I have lightened the striker spring. So I get out my Walther P5 and my carry P99c, both of which are factory stock. Well I had the same problem. I had the best luck with the compact and was able to shoot up the box of ammo but I had several that I had to pull the trigger twice or three times.  I must admit that the ammo shot a very good group. I was well pleased with it on that point. So what was up? Hard primers? I don't know? I have had no trouble with any of my 99s using my own reloads of any other factory ammo. So I took it into the range owner and we opened another sealed box and upon examination it most definitely showed that the primers where seated too far compared to other factory ammo that was in the store.

My conclusion: The Walthers are just fine. The Israeli ammo shot a very nice group. But some of the surplus stuff had the primers seated too deep and because of the sealed boxes you are not able to inspect the stuff to know whether it would be okay or not.

My experience is not scientific but it was empirical enough for me. I will not buy anymore of this ammo unless it is loose and I can inspect it first. But I have no desire to pick through individual 9mm rds just to check primer depth. Forget it, I will stick with WWB ammo. I wish I had a 9mm carbine to see how this stuff would work...do you think that this is sub-gun ammo?  Would that make any difference? I don't think that primer depth would make any difference unless an UZI carrier bolt system works differently that say a P99 or a Glock? If someone out there has a carbine and would like to try some I could ship you a box or two...or at least give you the name of the dealer here in Louisville from whom you may obtain some...inquiring minds would like to know?  
 

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I can offer some info. on the Uzi firing system.......

It doesn't have a "moving" firing pin. The firing pin is nothing more than a dimple in the center of the solid steel Bolt.
Because of this fact, the Uzi works with an "Open Bolt " system where the bolt must be locked open or to the rear in order for the weapon to be at the ready to fire. If the bolt is closed on an Uzi, you can be reasonable sure the weapon has no round in the chamber. This design was adopted to prevent accidental discharges of the weapon during parachute jumps. The weapon's bolt is closed, then a magazine is loaded........and the weapon will not fire until the bolt is cocked. Too many soldiers were being injured during "Jumps" with a closed bolt weapon system when the person would hit the ground......firing pins were being jarred into the loaded cartridge causing it to fire.

Yes Military ammo on purpose have "hard primers"......... this is more or less standard SOP. Anyone who owns an AR15 will tell you that just allowing the bolt to charge a round into the chamber will show an alarming primer dent from the firing pin being thrust forward under inertia. The hard primers on military ammo prevents this from being a problem ----- but to new owners of this weapon, it can be quite scarry to see for the first time.

I would guess that there is a chance the ammo might have been sub-gun ammo, that would explain the hard primers and possibly the deep set primer pockets. You should have noticed more of a recoil from this ammo though ........because a lot of sub-gun ammo is loaded intentionally hot. If the recoil was normal....... I don't know


JF.
 

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This ammo is definitely SMG ammo and is not recommended for pistol use.  The IDF forbids using it for pistols.  It is hot & dirty.  Do yourself and your pistols a favor and don't use it.
 
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