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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just received standard replacement (20-lb.) and stiffer (24-lb.) recoil springs from Wolff for my S&W .380 blue PPK.
I only got the chance to run 75 rounds of Rem UMC thru it with the 20-lb. Wolff installed. There were no failures to ignite or cycle, but the trigger went back to DA on the last round in each mag. I will have to put the factory Walther spring back in and test it, but that was the first time I have had anything like that happen with the gun. :confused:
 

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I have a factory spring still installed on my PPK/s from S&W and occassionally have the same thing happen to me shooting. 3 times to be exact, but it is the last round out of a mag and I have to shoot the last shot DA. I called S&W and they told me to return the gun, but I have yet to do so. I posted another thread asking about this about a week ago and got some good replies. Maybe do a search on my name and see if you can make any headway on the possible problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm hoping its an idiosyncracy of the Wolff spring, since it happened on every mag on the same round. So I will have to reinstall the factory spring to test that. If the same thing happens, then it was coincidence and I have the same problem you do.
 

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For what its worth, I haven't had any similar problem with my Wolff 20# spring. It is a fair amount stiffer than the S&W factory one. It has to make you wonder when it only happens on the last round in the mag. Have you tried removing the mag prior to firing the last round? It always makes me nervous when folks have the hammer go forward on its own, for any reason. I had that happen to me when I first started ringing my PPK out, and the hammer dropped on its own - about three seconds after a fresh round had been chambered! Only the hammer block prevented an AD.

Keep us posted as to what you discover.
 

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I will offer my expierence with this "problem".

I found that after a few years, the hammers on every PP series gun I've owned started riding down with the slide, causing the pistol to reset into "Double Action" Mode.

To cure this I switched out practically every part in the pistol that I could remove and exchange. After a lot of trial and error, I found the causes (on my pistols) to be the recoil spring and the hammer spring. It appears to me that those springs weakened or took a set- in any case they were not functioning 100%, and the extra "whack" to the gun knocked the hammer off the sear - the result was the hammer riding down with the slide.

I first had this happen with a .380 PPKS (Walther made) then a .32 PPK (also Walther) and a pre War .22 Model PP. I cured the .380 with a replacement recoil spring from Walther, the .32 with standard weight replacement recoil and hammer springs from Wolff, and used the same treatment for the PP .22

Since the spring replacements, it has been along time ... in the case of the PPK more than 15 years. All the pistols still function perfectly. IMHO there is something irratic in the way these spring are made, prehaps the heat treatment, and some just go bad .... but there is no predicting it. Worse, I could not precieve any "felt" difference between the new springs and the old ones.

Just make sure you color code the different springs with paint or something so as not to mix them up. This spring issue is the only flaw I have ever found in the PP design. What is even stranger is that I know of other Walthers from before WW2 that are still running perfectly with their original springs???

Go figure!

PS: This could also be induced by "limp wristing" the pistol, especially if you are having this problem with a near empty (and lighter) pistol. Make sure when testing that you have a good hold on your Walther.
 

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I will offer my expierence with this "problem".

I found that after a few years, the hammers on every PP series gun I've owned started riding down with the slide, causing the pistol to reset into "Double Action" Mode.

To cure this I switched out practically every part in the pistol that I could remove and exchange. After a lot of trial and error, I found the causes (on my pistols) to be the recoil spring and the hammer spring. It appears to me that those springs weakened or took a set- in any case they were not functioning 100%, and the extra "whack" to the gun knocked the hammer off the sear - the result was the hammer riding down with the slide.

I first had this happen with a .380 PPKS (Walther made) then a .32 PPK (also Walther) and a pre War .22 Model PP. I cured the .380 with a replacement recoil spring from Walther, the .32 with standard weight replacement recoil and hammer springs from Wolff, and used the same treatment for the PP .22

Since the spring replacements, it has been along time ... in the case of the PPK more than 15 years. All the pistols still function perfectly. IMHO there is something irratic in the way these spring are made, prehaps the heat treatment, and some just go bad .... but there is no predicting it. Worse, I could not precieve any "felt" difference between the new springs and the old ones.

Just make sure you color code the different springs with paint or something so as not to mix them up. This spring issue is the only flaw I have ever found in the PP design. What is even stranger is that I know of other Walthers from before WW2 that are still running perfectly with their original springs???

Go figure!

PS: This could also be induced by "limp wristing" the pistol, especially if you are having this problem with a near empty (and lighter) pistol. Make sure when testing that you have a good hold on your Walther.
153: I don't disbelieve your facts, but I have a gut feeling that your conclusion of cause and effect is mistaken. For this condition to afflict three different guns of yours is practically a unique experience and contrary to my observations of Walther PP-series pistols; it suggests to me that some other element was responsible. Without examining your guns, I won't venture a guess as to what it might be, but my experience tells me that hammer follow-down or jar-off can be caused by many things, but a marginally weak recoil spring is not one of them.

Anyway, I'm glad yours now work.

M
 

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Mike,

I would be willing to entertain the notion that I am wrong, except that replacing the springs was the only thing that cured the problem.

The only parts in these Walthers I did not remove and replace was the riveted sear, the hammer strut and magazine release. At the time I fought this battle I was working in a fully equipped gunshop, with a test area. So I am confident in the conclusions I reached regards my pistols. Note too that I was NOT playing with the sear to get a smooth/lighter pull - all parts were stock!

Again, since changing out the springs I have not had the problem return.

Edit to add this PS: After re-reading your post I would add I don't think the recoil spring was "marginally" weak, I think it was a combination of a significently weak recoil spring AND a weakened hammer spring in the case of the PPK and .22 PP. In the .380 PPKS all I replaced was the recoil spring, as I recall (this was in the late 1970's) it was "compressed" when compared to the replacement OEM spring.
 

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I think the term "marginally" was appropriate considering that you wrote that you "could not perceive any 'felt' difference" between the new and old springs. If you could not, I doubt that there was enough difference to generate the malfunction you've described. It's more plausible that a weak hammer spring (rather than the recoil spring) might adversely affect the sear engagement but unless there is something more fundamentally wrong with the lockwork to begin with, it seems improbable. As far as length goes, any spring will take a "set" after a little use and will always be shorter than a new one.

I'd be more inclined to suspect some interference from the grips, or a sticking hammer block, or a missing, broken or lame hammer block spring. But unless you disassemble only one item at a time, it's often impossible to tell afterward which "fix" was the one that truly worked.

In any event, it's academic now: your guns have worked for some years.

M
 
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