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I don't mean to be insensitive to those on a tight budget, but realistically speaking, we're talking about pistols that are mostly under $700 here. I feel like 10 years of support is certainly fair. If my PPQ broke and was unable to be fixed in 2030, I would just buy the current model(assuming they are still legal).
True but if you really love a gun that can't be fixed...
 
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True but if you really love a gun that can't be fixed...
Yeah I hear you. If it were custom 1911s we were talking about here that are difficult to replace, I would certainly feel differently. But I consider polymer pistols like PPQs tools to do a job. And the PDP is frankly so close to a PPQ i think most PPQ owners would be satisfied to move into the PDP
 

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Yeah I hear you. If it were custom 1911s we were talking about here that are difficult to replace, I would certainly feel differently. But I consider polymer pistols like PPQs tools to do a job. And the PDP is frankly so close to a PPQ i think most PPQ owners would be satisfied to move into the PDP
I'm in the minority but I like my PPQ so much, I have no interest in a PDP....now, anyway. :)
 

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Out of curiosity I have a question for long time (10 years +) pistol owners. How many part failures have you encountered that required a factory replacement part?
For real. The only pistols I ever HAD to replace broken or worn out parts on where well over half a century old at the time. The extractor on my East German Makarov (which later developed a crack in the slide) and the recoil springs of my 42 P.38.
 

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Out of curiosity I have a question for long time (10 years +) pistol owners. How many part failures have you encountered that required a factory replacement part?

Honestly? Quite a few.

But when I was serious about improving for USPSA and 3-Gun, I was shooting 40k rounds of 9mm a year, when I started getting into it in 2012-2013, I was running 9-12k a year. That said, I suspect that's far more use than most guns will see in a lifetime. Then again, that's why when I got serious, I moved to CZ and now Beretta, because those brands have run the 75, and 92 lines for years, so I've got no fear about replacing parts over their lifespan. This year I won't even be close, I've got enough materials to load about 20k rounds, and who knows where, where, and how much it'll cost to find replacements, so I'm definitely more selective.

For a polymer pistol? I think 10 years is a pretty reasonable number, and in my guns other than competition guns? I think maybe two qualify as a part failures in normal use, so that's a whole different story, and I think that's more indicative of what most people should experience. Once of twice in a lifetime of ownership and use.....
 

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My Q45 is my EDC... Oh well, I'd better start buying back up parts.
 
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That's a damn good question.
April 5, 2021 - Called Walther customer service, regarding PPQ discontinuation. Here's what he said:
"Mainline" is defined as: 9, 40, 45 and NAVY PPQ models with no optic cut and 4", 4.2" or 5" barrels. I did not ask about M1 vs M2, but I'm pretty sure they are both affected. I did not ask about any other model, such as the PPQ-SC, PPS, etc.

The mainline PPQ models will be slowly discontinued in 2021. You should be able to buy one through most of 2021, but they will be ramping down production as the year goes on, so some configurations may become unavailable sooner than others.
PPQ parts should continue to be available for "a good while", he could not define just how long.
Q4 & q5 are not affected, nor is the PPQ M2 .22.

Let's agree the pandemic will continue to affect availability, that was not part of the discussion.

Oh, Walther has heard of people putting the PDP slide on the PPQ grip, but does NOT recommend it.
I’m still very happy with my PPQ M2 which I purchased 2 months ago. I knew at some point it would go away because they have made it for a long time now. However I don’t think you will see the current version PDP for very long. I’m just guessing the market is moving more to a smaller more streamline size which the PDP is not!
 

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Yeah I hear you. If it were custom 1911s we were talking about here that are difficult to replace, I would certainly feel differently. But I consider polymer pistols like PPQs tools to do a job. And the PDP is frankly so close to a PPQ i think most PPQ owners would be satisfied to move into the PDP
I own both and the PDP is slightly better than the PPQ (in my humble opinion).
 

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I don't mean to be insensitive to those on a tight budget, but realistically speaking, we're talking about pistols that are mostly under $700 here. I feel like 10 years of support is certainly fair. If my PPQ broke and was unable to be fixed in 2030, I would just buy the current model(assuming they are still legal).
I bought a Kimber that is only warranted for 1 year. 10 years on a pistol.sounds great to me.
 

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Out of curiosity I have a question for long time (10 years +) pistol owners. How many part failures have you encountered that required a factory replacement part?
If you shoot them parts fail. 1911: barrel link, thumb safety, hammer and strut, and OEM springs have a 3000-5000 round lifespan. Spring companies make oem and better replacements. I always buy two spare springs when I order replacements.

Magazines all wear out eventually. Usually the mag catch hole will wear out of spec first then the springs, then the feed lips will deform, wear, bulge, or crack.

My old P38 has worn out mags and the slide has sharpened itself over the years. Small split pins typically shear off eventually or fall out as seen on early Springfield XDs.

Barrels last between 10,000 and 20,000 rounds before you get tolerance drop off. Thats two to four sets of recoil springs.

Fire control components eventually wear out with round count. 1911 will go full auto when the FCG wears or the sear spring loses tension.

Polymer frames have been known to warp and crack due to age and temps. Slides and barrels crack frequently and bulge due to over pressured rounds in 9mm which is common. They also cause mag stress and ruin mag catch holes which causes mag feed and mag drops.

Polymer striker channels tend to crack and bind the striker and should be replaced with metal alternatives if possible.

Bottom line is if you have guns you intend on relying on and using, stock up on parts. Pack them into corrosion resistant bags and seal them. Everything wears out. Some guns like 1911 have millions of aftermarket parts and oem parts. Others not so much. Decisions.
 

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Wonder how it affects the legendary life time warranty:

Our warranty provides unwavering support for your new firearm and continues for the life cycle of the product as long as the company manufactures and supports it.
Key words there being "for the life cycle of the product" It appears it has reached "end of life".
 

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Are you in need of the Q4 Tactical Classic with ugly paddle mag release ?
Ugly? It’s basically invisible, blends in with the trigger guard. Also I know people with small or hand issues like one of my marine buddies that lost most his thumb in the service, that the paddle works better for. It’s actually faster for a lot of people, it’s less likely to have accidental mag loss also
 

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Sorry, but a ten year limited lifetime warranty is a contradiction in terms.
Either there is a warranty for the entire lifetime of a weapon, which experience has shown is significantly longer than 10 years.
But if the warranty is only 10 years, it cannot be called a lifetime warranty.
So, in my opinion, Limited Lifetime Warranty is just a stupid advertising slogan that Walther should avoid in this form.
This is also proven by Walther's statements about the warranty for the soon-to-be-discontinued PPQ.
It would be more honest to only speak of a 10 year warranty and omit the term lifetime.
"Our warranty provides unwavering support for your new firearm and continues for the life cycle of the product as long as the company manufactures and supports it. "

Life of the product.
Gotta have reasonable expectations. "Lifetime Warranty" doesn't mean they must support it when my great grandkids are shooting it.
 

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"Our warranty provides unwavering support for your new firearm and continues for the life cycle of the product as long as the company manufactures and supports it. "

Life of the product.
Gotta have reasonable expectations. "Lifetime Warranty" doesn't mean they must support it when my great grandkids are shooting it.
Limited Lifetime typically means the original purchaser gets a lifetime of support for normal use from the product. This usually entails replacement for defects, repairs, and or part replacement. This wording is deceptive. What they are offering is a Ten Year Warranty. Life of the product is vague. If they want to be tricky with the wording they could call it Life Cycle Warranty. But I call shenanigans on this "Lifetime Warranty" that involves a ten year "life cycle" or whatever they call it. This will only succeed in alienating customers. I do not need a transferable lifetime legacy warranty to feel comfortable buying a pistol but Walther being up-front with the warranty specifics is critical.
 

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I already have enough PPQ's to last until the end of my lifecycle.

This is kinda like new cars.....they make a new one every year and stop making the old one.
 
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